Kino Lorber has TV Titles from Universal…

3 Stars

Kino Lorber announced a recent deal with NBCUniversal for about 200 titles (See the Kino Lorber Insider Thread on the Blu-ray and UHD board) which includes (At least) 1 TV Series and 8 TV Movies.

I’m surprised it hasn’t been brought up here. They really haven’t said anything (as usual) about what the TV Serie(s) and TV movie(s) are or might be.

Anyone know the rights status to RUN FOR YOUR LIFE or T.H.E. CAT (NBC production property but that may be tied up with the whole NTA pre-1973 NBC Films deal which means CBS may have the rights)

My thought TV Series wise might be one, or more, of the MCA/REVUE anthology series – due to the large number of known stars – before and when they were famous – and the depth of the anthology library B&W and Color. I could see “best of” compilations rather than series for a wider selection.

Hey, Neil Brock, any thoughts – you are always insightful on this sort of thing.

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  1. One TV show that is sorely lacking a DVD release as of late, that I hope K-L will tackle, is Still the Beaver, aka The New Leave It to Beaver.

    This revival of the 1957-63 CBS/ABC series Leave it to Beaver had originally started with a two-hour made-for-TV movie which aired on CBS in 1983, which was then broken up into four half-hour episodes when re-ran on Disney Channel and later (W)TBS with the proper half-hour seasons.

    ~Ben

  2. DeWilson

    Kino Lorber announced a recent deal with NBCUniversal for about 200 titles (See the Kino Lorber Insider Thread on the Blu-ray and UHD board) which includes (At least) 1 TV Series and 8 TV Movies.

    I'm surprised it hasn't been brought up here. They really haven't said anything (as usual) about what the TV Serie(s) and TV movie(s) are or might be.

    Anyone know the rights status to RUN FOR YOUR LIFE or T.H.E. CAT (NBC production property but that may be tied up with the whole NTA pre-1973 NBC Films deal which means CBS may have the rights)

    My thought TV Series wise might be one, or more, of the MCA/REVUE anthology series – due to the large number of known stars – before and when they were famous – and the depth of the anthology library B&W and Color. I could see "best of" compilations rather than series for a wider selection.

    Hey, Neil Brock, any thoughts – you are always insightful on this sort of thing.

    Kolchak: The Night Stalker (1974-1975), restored and released on Blu-Ray. I wish they could do it!

  3. As a few others have said already, it's likely a short run, one season show…to accommodate KL's cautious selection of what TV series will likely sell enough units, and being mindful of disc count and retail price point.

    I'd like to see a whole lot of Universal B+W TV newly released on DVD, or upgraded to Blu, but I'm guessing Universal's 1968-69 Darren McGavin P.I. series The Outsider, 26 one hour episodes and the 1967 TV movie pilot. A great, groundbreaking series about an ex-con private detective, abandoned as a child and reared in abusive institutions, who suffers from his anxiety attacks, depression and perhaps alcoholism…if some of this sounds familiar to the later The Rockford Files, there's a reason, as both shows were created by Roy Huggins…The Outsider is the only Darren McGavin show that has yet to see a DVD release…like the immortal Rockford files, The Outsider is a great combination of witty humor and drama.

    I've already asked KL about The Outsider

    If KL might do a longer running Universal TV series, I might hope for McCloud…only a re-edited season one with the uncut season two were released in R1 DVD…Madman released the other 6 seasons in R4 locked DVD.

  4. My list, none of which will turn up as Kino's choice based on their telling us it will be a short-lived series, would include but not be limited to:

    Bachelor Father
    Restless Gun
    (for better prints)
    The John Forsythe Show
    The Wide Country
    (for better prints)
    Sheriff Lobo
    New Leave it to Beaver
    (does Universal even own that?)

    Gary "not going to name stuff like The Munsters that has already had a solid release" O.

  5. Short-run, one-season-or-less, I'm going to guess it may be either:

    Darkroom (1981-82, horror anthology, 7 hour-long episodes)

    Cliffhangers!
    (1979, mystery/sci-fi/western/horror serialized multi-story mix, 10 hour-long episodes)

    Otherworld
    (1985, family sci-fi drama, 8 hour-long episodes)

    Suspicion
    (1957-58, crime/suspense anthology, 23 hour-long episodes) -but this last one, despite its Alfred Hitchcock pedigree, would be a real long shot.

    I'd dearly love for it to be T.H.E. Cat (1966-67, action/drama, 26 half-hour episodes), my most-wanted 'grail' series of all, but I think Denny answered his own question in the opening post, about CBS (now Paramount) owning the old pre-1973 NBC Films series (which would also include Buck Henry's Captain Nice (1966, fantasy sitcom, 15 half-hour episodes), rather than Universal.

    I hope if Kino does another deal with Paramount, they'd seriously consider excavating and remastering T.H.E. Cat from the CBS vaults, as it's a major cult gem awaiting rediscovery, on par with The Wild Wild West, The Avengers, The Invaders, The Prisoner and Kolchak (and, I'd argue, superior to fun shows like The Green Hornet, UFO, Honey West and The Time Tunnel).

  6. Gary OS

    My list, none of which will turn up as Kino's choice based on their telling us it will be a short-lived series, would include but not be limited to:

    Bachelor Father
    Restless Gun
    (for better prints)
    The John Forsythe Show
    The Wide Country
    (for better prints)
    Sheriff Lobo
    New Leave it to Beaver
    (does Universal even own that?)

    Gary "not going to name stuff like The Munsters that has already had a solid release" O.

    How do Bachelor Father (157) episodes and New Leave it to Beaver (101) qualify as "short lived"?

  7. Among Universal shows, which I don't have, I would hope for The Outsider, although having had the chance to view all of the episodes over the last few years at various archives, its not a great show. There's an excellent article on how the show was bastardized and had most of the violence edited out: https://www.tvobscurities.com/2009/10/tv-violence-in-1968-the-outsider/

    A couple of shows, which are highly unlikely that I'd love to see, are 90 Bristol Court, with all 3 segments, 52 half hours total. Also, one of the rarest westerns, The Road West, which starred two of the beauties of 60s TV, Brenda Scott and Kathryn Hays.

  8. Neil Brock

    Among Universal shows, which I don't have, I would hope for The Outsider, although having had the chance to view all of the episodes over the last few years at various archives, its not a great show. There's an excellent article on how the show was bastardized and had most of the violence edited out: https://www.tvobscurities.com/2009/10/tv-violence-in-1968-the-outsider/

    Very good overview of The Outsider. Thanks for the link.​

  9. Neil Brock

    Qintex, which went bankrupt: https://www.orlandosentinel.com/news/os-xpm-1989-11-14-8911132743-story.html

    The closest successor-in-interest to them is Sonar Entertainment, née Hallmark Entertainment, née RHI Entertainment. They're the same company that remade Gypsy with Bette Midler, Bye Bye Birdie with Jason Alexander, Call of the Wild with Rick Schroder (Qintex produced Lonesome Dove before buying the farm), and Alice in Wonderland with Whoopi Goldberg as the Cheshire Cat. Then they bought out Filmation and junked the negatives to almost everything and kept only PAL videotape copies. That and the 2008 Universal vault fire put a big question mark over it. Who actually got physical ownership of the master tapes? Universal or RHI/Hallmark/Sonar?

    If Universal could come to a clear agreement with Sony about who owns what regarding Punky Brewster, then, in theory, they should be able to reach some kind of a deal for The New Leave it to Beaver. I just don't think they've bothered to ask because they're more concerned with who's streaming The Office.

  10. If there is anything else from Universal's vaults K-L should touch…
    McCloud (unfinished on DVD here; but complete in R4)
    Owen Marshall, Counselor at Law (1971-1974)
    Baretta (1975-1978)
    The Invisible Man (1975-1976)
    Switch (1975-1978)
    Ellery Queen (1975-1976)
    The Hardy Boys/Nancy Drew Mysteries (1977-1979) (first two seasons have replaced music on some episodes)
    Delta House (1979)
    B. J. and the Bear (1979-1981)
    The Misadventures of Sheriff Lobo (1979-1981)
    When the Whistle Blows (1980)
    Domestic Life (1984)
    Fast Times (1986)
    Major Dad (1989-1993)
    The Antagonists (1991)
    Princesses (1991)

    TV movies:
    Amateur Night at the Dixie Bar and Grill (1979)
    The Seekers (miniseries, 1979)
    Masada (1981)
    The Jerk, Too (1984)
    Portrait of a White Marriage (1988)
    The Lookalike (1990)

    ~Ben

  11. MatthewA

    The closest successor-in-interest to them is Sonar Entertainment, née Hallmark Entertainment, née RHI Entertainment. They're the same company that remade Gypsy with Bette Midler, Bye Bye Birdie with Jason Alexander, Call of the Wild with Rick Schroder (Qintex produced Lonesome Dove before buying the farm), and Alice in Wonderland with Whoopi Goldberg as the Cheshire Cat. Then they bought out Filmation and junked the negatives to almost everything and kept only PAL videotape copies. That and the 2008 Universal vault fire put a big question mark over it. Who actually got physical ownership of the master tapes? Universal or RHI/Hallmark/Sonar?

    If Universal could come to a clear agreement with Sony about who owns what regarding Punky Brewster, then, in theory, they should be able to reach some kind of a deal for The New Leave it to Beaver. I just don't think they've bothered to ask because they're more concerned with who's streaming The Office.

    The Filmation situation, not to mention that RHI almost trashed all the domestic Hal Roach negatives (Thankfully rescued by the overseas rights holders and UCLA) is a long story in itself. Unfortunately what they did to the Filmation library has ripple effects that affect the current rights holder (Dreamworks Animation) to this day.

    Here we go again with the Universal "Vault Fire" stuff myth – all masters were stored off-site and the vault in question was a "working vault" – stuff mastered for syndication – syndication copies – no originals were lost. (as for the UMG music holdings, well that is another long story…)

    As for "Punky Brewster", there really was no issue – NBC produced the show, but at the time the FCC had rules about networks owning syndication companies (repealed years ago) and Sony (Well, then Columbia Pictures Television) picked up the syndication rights and rights to produced additional seasons for syndication which in some form NBC had an interest in right in. Two seasons worth of shows were shot for syndication. The only reason there wasn't a 5th season (or additional seasons of "The New Gidget" and "What's Happening Now!") was that Colpix TV got out of first run syndication.

  12. mark-edk

    I concur with Cliffhangers and would add Supertrain though I don't know if it's actually a Universal property or not. Remastered Blu-rays of Ellery Queen and Kolchak would also get me to open my wallet.

    "Supertrain" was produced in-house by NBC Production, so it would be an NBC/Universal property.

  13. Peter M Fitzgerald

    I'd dearly love it to be T.H.E. Cat (1966-67, action/drama, 26 half-hour episodes), my most-wanted 'grail' series of all, but I think Denny answered his own question in the opening post, about CBS (now Paramount) owning the old pre-1973 NBC Films series (which would also include Buck Henry's Captain Nice (1966, fantasy sitcom, 15 half-hour episodes), rather than Universal.

    UNIVERSAL Did produce "Mr. Terrific" … the "other" Superhero spoof of the 1960's..that could also be a possibility.

    But yet, The NTA/CBS situation may have tied up T.H.E. CAT and CAPTAIN NICE (which I recall when it was shown on one of the comedy channels, or was it WOR National, in the early 1990's it was from Republic – which was NTA)

  14. DeWilson

    The Filmation situation, not to mention that RHI almost trashed all the domestic Hal Roach negatives (Thankfully rescued by the overseas rights holders and UCLA) is a long story in itself. Unfortunately what they did to the Filmation library has ripple effects that affect the current rights holder (Dreamworks Animation) to this day.

    Here we go again with the Universal "Vault Fire" stuff myth – all masters were stored off-site and the vault in question was a "working vault" – stuff mastered for syndication – syndication copies – no originals were lost. (as for the UMG music holdings, well that is another long story…)

    As for "Punky Brewster", there really was no issue – NBC produced the show, but at the time the FCC had rules about networks owning syndication companies (repealed years ago) and Sony (Well, then Columbia Pictures Television) picked up the syndication rights and rights to produced additional seasons for syndication which in some form NBC had an interest in right in. Two seasons worth of shows were shot for syndication. The only reason there wasn't a 5th season (or additional seasons of "The New Gidget" and "What's Happening Now!") was that Colpix TV got out of first run syndication.

    All of that is true except that it was Coca-Cola that owned Columbia Pictures at the time. The same year all those syndicated shows ended*, they basically consolidated all their entertainment holdings into one big company and gradually pawned off on Sony. By the end of 1989 they were out of the entertainment business completely. Except for selling concessions to movie theaters, which is the main reason they wanted in to begin with.

    So if the New Beaver master tapes still exist, then it’s just a matter of making a deal with the other copyright holder to make sure they get their fair share.

    Qintex also almost ended up owning MGM, so it’s likely they would’ve fared no better under that situation that they ultimately did under Giancarlo Paretti.

    *And you forgot The New Monkees.

  15. MatthewA

    All of that is true except that it was Coca-Cola that owned Columbia Pictures at the time. The same year all those syndicated shows ended*, they basically consolidated all their entertainment holdings into one big company and gradually pawned off on Sony. By the end of 1989 they were out of the entertainment business completely. Except for selling concessions to movie theaters, which is the main reason they wanted in to begin with.

    So if the New Beaver master tapes still exist, then it’s just a matter of making a deal with the other copyright holder to make sure they get their fair share.

    Qintex also almost ended up owning MGM, so it’s likely they would’ve fared no better under that situation that they ultimately did under Giancarlo Paretti.

    *And you forgot The New Monkees.

    I believe Universal could still try suing whoever is the successor-in-interest to Qintex to reclaim the other part of the rights, what they don't have, of Still the Beaver.

    ~Ben

  16. Darby67

    Three more hopes:

    Season 7 of Alfred Hitchcock Presents

    All three seasons of The Alfred Hitchcock Hour

    Season 2 of Amazing Stories

    I forgot about the second season of Amazing Stories but that's another one that seems possible to me too.

  17. That Kino did Outer Limits makes me wonder about Night Gallery, but I’m not sure if Universal actually mastered the show in HD when they put out the DVDs… what’s on those discs looks pretty ancient. But that would certainly get my attention.

  18. Josh Steinberg

    That Kino did Outer Limits makes me wonder about Night Gallery, but I’m not sure if Universal actually mastered the show in HD when they put out the DVDs… what’s on those discs looks pretty ancient. But that would certainly get my attention.

    Kino also did the very rare The Ghost of Sierra de Cobre.​
  19. David Weicker

    Well, Kolchak, The Night Stalker was asked about on the other site.

    KL asked for and was denied (hinted that its with another distributor)

    So Kolchak: The Night Stalker is blocked for the time being.
    Darren McGavin-wise, Kochak has more appeal than The Outsider because Kolchak has a cult following
    and can be a good candidate for a release.​
  20. MatthewA

    All of that is true except that it was Coca-Cola that owned Columbia Pictures at the time. The same year all those syndicated shows ended*, they basically consolidated all their entertainment holdings into one big company and gradually pawned off on Sony. By the end of 1989 they were out of the entertainment business completely. Except for selling concessions to movie theaters, which is the main reason they wanted in to begin with.

    Coke products are still sold in many theaters, are they not (even long after they disbanded from CPT and sold that to Sony)?

  21. Ethan Riley

    Only Cliffhangers will do, including that long-lost final segment I've been waiting 40+ years to see.

    Amen to that, Ethan! It is too bad they only aired the 11th episode overseas. I would love to see the concluding chapters for "The Secret Empire" and "Stop Susan Williams"

  22. DeWilson

    The Filmation situation, not to mention that RHI almost trashed all the domestic Hal Roach negatives (Thankfully rescued by the overseas rights holders and UCLA) is a long story in itself. Unfortunately what they did to the Filmation library has ripple effects that affect the current rights holder (Dreamworks Animation) to this day.

    It was actually Hallmark that came close to junking the Hal Roach negatives and not RHI. Let's say that there was a lot of rejoicing in the Roach and L&H fan communities when RHI acquired (or reacquired) the rights to the Roach catalog. Generally speaking, RHI has treated the Roach library very well as evidenced by the release of that sound era L&H DVD set as well as making the films available for licensing as seen with the Charley Chase sets, etc.

  23. Purple Wig

    The Psychiatrist/San Francisco International Airport?

    I actually sent a suggestion to KL that they either do a set of Steven Spielberg directed TV shows for Universal, which would include 2 episodes of The Psychiatrist or a set of the pilot movies of those 2 as well as the other failed Mystery Movie series.

  24. Arthur Powell

    It was actually Hallmark that came close to junking the Hal Roach negatives and not RHI. Let's say that there was a lot of rejoicing in the Roach and L&H fan communities when RHI acquired (or reacquired) the rights to the Roach catalog. Generally speaking, RHI has treated the Roach library very well as evidenced by the release of that sound era L&H DVD set as well as making the films available for licensing as seen with the Charley Chase sets, etc.

    I don't know about Laurel and Hardy, but aren't all of the Hal Roach TV series, like The Veil for instance, public domain?

  25. DeWilson

    Here we go again with the Universal "Vault Fire" stuff myth – all masters were stored off-site and the vault in question was a "working vault" – stuff mastered for syndication – syndication copies – no originals were lost. (as for the UMG music holdings, well that is another long story…)

    Yes and no. The 35mm negatives and masters of FILMED shows were stored off site. Shows which were produced on 2-inch videotape were burned up and are lost. Luckily, Universal didn't produce a great many shows on tape, but things like Don Adams Screen Test, for instance, is gone. The Jack Benny Show did some shows on film and some on 2-inch tape, and all of those tapes are lost. While Universal didn't produce any regular variety series, to the best of my knowledge, they did do specials and those are destroyed as well.
    I haven't heard about some of the little failed sitcoms that they did on tape, such as Sirota's Court and Semi-Tough, but I'm assuming those are burned up too.

  26. The restoration of The Psychiatrist (1971) for a Blu-Ray edition from Kino Lorber.
    It's a six episode series with a 1970 television movie.

    THREE REASONS
    1. actor Roy Thinnes
    2. director Steven Spielberg *
    3. composer Gil Mellé **


    Footnotes
    * “The Private World of Martin Dalton”, “Par for the Course”.
    ** “In Death’s Other Kingdom”, “The Private World of Martin Dalton”, “Such Civil War in My Love and Hate”.

    View attachment 67743

  27. Well if it can't be Kolchack The Night Stalker, then frankly I have no more real needs for Universal titles on BD. Mill Creek has released pretty much everything I want. Quantum Leap, The Rockford Files, Miami Vice, Airwolf, Knight Rider. And other countries have filled in the gaps with Buck Rogers, The Incredible Hulk, Magnum P.I.,, The A-Team, Six Million Dollar Man, and soon to be release The Bionic Woman on BD!

    I'm at a loss on to what is possibly left that I would want…especially if it is short lived.

    Maybe this? I don't know.

  28. Neil Brock

    Yes and no. The 35mm negatives and masters of FILMED shows were stored off site. Shows which were produced on 2-inch videotape were burned up and are lost. Luckily, Universal didn't produce a great many shows on tape, but things like Don Adams Screen Test, for instance, is gone. The Jack Benny Show did some shows on film and some on 2-inch tape, and all of those tapes are lost.

    UCLA has a set of "Don Adams Screen Test" as I recall.

    The one videotape Universal show I know of that's likely a goner is "Sirota's Court" with the still alive and kicking Michael Constantine. An off-air recording has the first seven minutes of one episode and Constantine's appearance on the Tonight Show plugging it's debut aired on Antenna and showed some clips.

  29. My guess is Buck Rogers in the 25th Century–cult genre TV shows seem to be the few that do well on Blu-ray (like The Outer Limits for Kino). Like OL, there are only 2 seasons and the show is available in HD (and yes, Blu-rays exist in other territories).

    Alfred Hitchcock Presents/Hour feels like it would be a major undertaking and the clearances for some of the original short story adaptations might be too cost prohibitive for a BD release, but I'd love a release. Six Million Dollar Man/Bionic Woman have HD masters (and released in Germany on BD), so they're potential candidates. Amazing Stories would also be a good candidate as a short cult series (is the reboot series still in development?), as would Night Gallery, but I don't know if either has HD masters.

  30. JoshuaB.

    Amazing Stories would also be a good candidate as a short cult series (is the reboot series still in development?), as would Night Gallery, but I don't know if either has HD masters.

    Yes! It's hitting Apple TV+ in April, I believe.

  31. As I read through this thread, I've come to realize how little most of these Universal titles are of interest to me. To be sure, over the years, I've watched and liked a few, but by and large, I've pretty much avoided most of these productions. I know that doesn't add much to the discussion.

    I *might* be interested in NIGHT GALLERY, but even there, I have all of the DVDs and rarely dig them out. Same with BUCK ROGERS.

    I never saw THE PSYCHIATRIST, but might be interested in that.

    But all of that McCLOUD, MYSTERY WHEEL stuff I usually avoided.

  32. Gary OS

    My list, none of which will turn up as Kino's choice based on their telling us it will be a short-lived series, would include but not be limited to:

    Bachelor Father
    Restless Gun
    (for better prints)
    The John Forsythe Show
    The Wide Country
    (for better prints)
    Sheriff Lobo
    New Leave it to Beaver
    (does Universal even own that?)

    Just hoping and praying that Kino, who has a great history with 50's movie fans like me, will consider Bachelor Father for us old timers if they somehow get the go ahead. Just loved that show!

  33. Neil Brock

    Yes and no. The 35mm negatives and masters of FILMED shows were stored off site. Shows which were produced on 2-inch videotape were burned up and are lost. Luckily, Universal didn't produce a great many shows on tape, but things like Don Adams Screen Test, for instance, is gone. The Jack Benny Show did some shows on film and some on 2-inch tape, and all of those tapes are lost. While Universal didn't produce any regular variety series, to the best of my knowledge, they did do specials and those are destroyed as well.
    I haven't heard about some of the little failed sitcoms that they did on tape, such as Sirota's Court and Semi-Tough, but I'm assuming those are burned up too.

    Ah ,yes – now I do recall some of the tape stuff did not have back-ups elsewhere, sadly. 🙁

    However, as for THE JACK BENNY SHOW, it's possible the estate might have kinescopes (or even tapes) of those VT episodes. (Heck, Universal Might have kines on those!) Has anyone looked into that?

  34. JohnHopper
    The restoration of The Psychiatrist (1971) for a Blu-Ray edition from Kino Lorber.
    It's a six episode series with a 1970 television movie.

    THREE REASONS
    1. actor Roy Thinnes
    2. director Steven Spielberg *
    3. composer Gil Mellé **


    Footnotes
    * “The Private World of Martin Dalton”, “Par for the Course”.
    ** “In Death’s Other Kingdom”, “The Private World of Martin Dalton”, “Such Civil War in My Love and Hate”.

    View attachment 67743

    You know, I forgot about this one – you know,and being early Spielberg might be motivation to get this one out on DVD.

  35. Arthur Powell

    It was actually Hallmark that came close to junking the Hal Roach negatives and not RHI. Let's say that there was a lot of rejoicing in the Roach and L&H fan communities when RHI acquired (or reacquired) the rights to the Roach catalog. Generally speaking, RHI has treated the Roach library very well as evidenced by the release of that sound era L&H DVD set as well as making the films available for licensing as seen with the Charley Chase sets, etc.

    Thanks for the correction.

  36. JoshuaB.

    My guess is Buck Rogers in the 25th Century–cult genre TV shows seem to be the few that do well on Blu-ray (like The Outer Limits for Kino). Like OL, there are only 2 seasons and the show is available in HD (and yes, Blu-rays exist in other territories).

    Gil Gerard was trying to bring that show back to make up for how NBC, who didn't own Universal at the time, screwed it over in season 2. Even Erin Gray was on board with it since it's unlikely her other NBC series will be back any time soon. But according to her, the studio refused to put up the money.

  37. The NBC of 1980 was in no position to turn him down. They lost a fortune on the Olympics because of the boycott, they had to pay another fortune to keep Johnny Carson on their network, they lost James Garner when The Rockford Files ended due to his health problems, all but two of their sitcoms were flopping hard, they were ready to cut Disney loose after 20 years for its failure to beat 60 Minutes (which would prove unbeatable in the years to come, a lesson Ms. Gray would learn the hard way), and to top that off, there was a writer's strike that almost ended the new season before it began!

  38. MatthewA

    All of that is true except that it was Coca-Cola that owned Columbia Pictures at the time. The same year all those syndicated shows ended*, they basically consolidated all their entertainment holdings into one big company and gradually pawned off on Sony.

    *And you forgot The New Monkees.

    The New Monkees was cancelled at midseason (unusual for a first-run weekly) and wouldn’t have continued past the 87-88 season regardless.

  39. JohnHopper
    The restoration of The Psychiatrist (1971) for a Blu-Ray edition from Kino Lorber.
    It's a six episode series with a 1970 television movie.

    THREE REASONS
    1. actor Roy Thinnes
    2. director Steven Spielberg *
    3. composer Gil Mellé **


    Footnotes
    * “The Private World of Martin Dalton”, “Par for the Course”.
    ** “In Death’s Other Kingdom”, “The Private World of Martin Dalton”, “Such Civil War in My Love and Hate”.

    View attachment 67743

    A REVIEW FROM IMDB

    Some of Steven Spielberg’s best work
    Cheyenne-Bodie10 May 2007

    There were two fine drama series on during the 1970-71 season. One was The Senator with Hal Holbrook. The other was this show.

    Roy Thinnes was excellent as psychiatrist Dr. James Whitman. The 32-year old Thinnes had already given two fine series performances: as Ben Quick in The Long, Hot Summer and as David Vincent in The Invaders.

    Executive producer Norman Felton (Dr. Kildare, The Man From U.N.C.L.E.) was doing an update of his previous superb psychiatry series The Eleventh Hour (1962-64). Roy Thinnes had given strong support on an Eleventh Hour episode about family therapy, in which Angela Lansbury and Martin Balsam played his parents, Tuesday Weld was his sister and Don Grady was his younger brother.

    Twenty-eight year old Jerrold Freedman was the ambitious producer of The Psychiatrist. Freedman asked his young friend Steven Spielberg to direct two episodes. Spielberg wasn’t too happy at the time as a Universal contract director, but Freedman offered him almost total freedom to do what he wanted. Spielberg obliged with two superb, adult television dramas.

    One Spielberg episode was about a troubled 12-year old boy whose parents may be on the verge of divorce. Jim Hutton and Kate Woodville played the remote parents. The boy tries to escape into a dream world.

    Spielberg’s other episode was about a young golfer who is dying of cancer (Clu Gulager in a virtuoso performance). Joan Darling played Gulager’s wife. The episode was titled “Par for the Course.”

    Spielberg’s direction of both episodes was extraordinary. This was the point where I learned who Spielberg was and became a big fan. At 24, Spielberg was amazingly the most interesting director working in TV. When I heard Spielberg was the director of Duel, I could hardly wait for it to air.

    Joe Alves, Jr. was the art director of The Psychiatrist. Alves went on to be art director of The Sugarland Express and production designer of Jaws and Close Encounters of the Third Kind.

    Producer Jerrold Freedman was also a boy wonder. He had brilliantly directed an episode of The Senator called “Power Play”, and he had written another episode of The Senator for which John Badham received a directing Emmy nomination. Freedman also wrote and directed the first episode of The Psychiatrist (with guest star Pete Duel) and received an Emmy nomination for the writing. There was a lot of ambitious young talent on the Universal lot at this point.

    Jerrold Freedman now writes novels under the name J. F. Freedman.

    The creators of The Psychiatrist were Richard Levinson and William Link (Columbo, Ellery Queen, That Certain Summer).

    Other talented episode directors were actor Jeff Corey (who taught acting to James Dean and Jack Nicholson, among others), Douglas Day Stewart (who wrote “An Officer and a Gentleman”) and Emmy winner Daryl Duke (The Senator, Payday, The Silent Partner, The Thorn Birds).

    The Psychiatrist was one of four shows making up “Four-in-One”. The other shows were McCloud with Dennis Weaver, San Francisco International Airport with Lloyd Bridges and Rod Serling's Night Gallery. Six hour-long episodes were produced of each series. The shows played in order: first six episodes of McCloud, then six episodes of San Francisco International Airport, then six episodes of Rod Serling's Night Gallery and finally six episodes of The Psychiatrist. In reruns, the shows alternated from week to week.

  40. As others have noted, reading the different list of shows Universal owns demonstrates to me they have very, very little I'm interested in that hasn't already been released on DVD (with Restless Gun being the lone exception because the prints were not great). I have no interest in the drama, medical, psych stuff from the 60's on up. Neither do I need an upgrade on the few sci-fi or horror titles I already own. In fact, other than Hec Ramsey (for Richard Boone) and Sheriff Lobo (for Claude Akins) I can't think of one title from '66 on up I'd purchase. Maybe I'd give the short-lived Gemini Man a try just for a nostalgia kick. But everything else from '66 on up I've either got on DVD or have no interest in.

    Now, what Kino will NOT go for that I'd love to see is any of the Revue library from the 50's and early 60's. I'd go for almost any one of the westerns, comedies, or crime/drama series from that era. Won't happen though. Of that I'm sure. Sigh…

    Gary "I'm a child of the 70's, but my tastes are primarily for 50's and early 60's material" O.

  41. For shorter run stuff I'd like to see them do "Operation Petticoat" which at one season plus ten episodes (though the 2nd season should never have happened) and the presence of John Astin and Jamie Lee Curtis could help make that more sellable.

    "Switch" was another title from the 70s I'd hoped to see but supposedly all tape transfers were lost and we'd have to see that totally redone.

    I'd certainly like to retire my R4 release of "The Law And Harry McGraw" one of the few 80s titles I have.

    But no more westerns…..please!

  42. Jack P

    But no more westerns…..please!

    Have no fear, my friend. I don't think 50's TV westerns are in Kino's wheelhouse.

    Gary "then again, I'm begging for no more 70's and 80's crime/drama type stuff" O. 😀

  43. Jack P

    But no more westerns…..please!

    Gary OS

    Gary "then again, I'm begging for no more 70's and 80's crime/law, drama, or supernatural type stuff" O. 😀

    And I'd like to see both more '50s and '60s westerns and more '70s and '80s cop shows and supernatural stuff! 😉

    Whatever Kino has plans to release, it likely won't please all of us…but I'm glad they are releasing any catalog TV content at all!

  44. Jack P

    I still need "The D.A." to finish that incomplete "Adam-12" crossover story! 😀

    Shout had interest in the series but as with many shows which were never syndicated, no usable elements were available (of course the 35mm prints exist but transfer costs are prohibitive). Luckily, the crossover episode was one of the four included in the re-edited TV movie put together from the series.

  45. Neil Brock

    Shout had interest in the series but as with many shows which were never syndicated, no usable elements were available (of course the 35mm prints exist but transfer costs are prohibitive). Luckily, the crossover episode was one of the four included in the re-edited TV movie put together from the series.

    There Was a reedited movie version?

  46. Neil Brock

    Came out in Germany years ago and that's as good as you're gonna get on that show. I want Karen as I liked that show with Debbie much better.

    Yes I know about the release in Germany. I think they should still consider releasing it here too. I did read about Karen online and it sounded like an interesting show. I wouldn't mind seeing that too.

  47. Jay*W

    McCloud done right, Banacek back in print and single-sides Quincy “season 2” would be very much appreciated.

    And if the 2nd season of Quincy, M.E. were packaged that way, then to me that would be:
    DISC 1:
    2×01: "Snake Eyes" (parts 1-2) (2/4/77)
    2×02: "…The Thigh Bone's Connected to the Knee Bone" (2/11/77)
    2×03: "Visitors in Paradise" (2/18/77)

    DISC 2:
    2×04: "The Two Sides of the Truth" (2/25/77)
    2×05: "Hit and Run at Danny's" (3/11/77)
    2×06: "Has Anybody Here Seen Quincy?" (3/18/77)

    DISC 3:
    2×07: "A Good Smack in the Mouth" (4/15/77)
    2×08: "The Hot Dog Murder" (4/22/77)
    2×09: "An Unfriendly Radiance" (4/29/77)

    DISC 4:
    2×10: "Sullied Be Thy Name" (5/6/77)
    2×11: "Valleyview" (5/13/77)
    2×12: "Let Me Light the Way" (5/27/77)

    ~Ben

  48. MatthewA

    The NBC of 1980 was in no position to turn him down. They lost a fortune on the Olympics because of the boycott, they had to pay another fortune to keep Johnny Carson on their network, they lost James Garner when The Rockford Files ended due to his health problems, all but two of their sitcoms were flopping hard, they were ready to cut Disney loose after 20 years for its failure to beat 60 Minutes (which would prove unbeatable in the years to come, a lesson Ms. Gray would learn the hard way), and to top that off, there was a writer's strike that almost ended the new season before it began!

    So maybe "screwed over" isn't the right way of putting it, but "succumbed to the effect of bad decisions made in moments of weakness" is more accurate. But even Gil Gerard was reportedly unhappy with the end result.

    Not to mention the producer, writers and cast of "Saturday Night Live" quitting. Incredibly, NBC decided to continue the show anyway!

  49. Ron Lee Green

    I would like to see The Sixth Sense, Get Christie Love, Cliffhangers!, and Harper Valley PTA

    Regarding "Sixth Sense" — those were syndicated as part of "Night Gallery" in edited form with new wraparounds by Rod Serling. Any interest in those, maybe as extras on a Night Gallery or Sixth Sense set?

  50. Neil Brock

    Yes and no. The 35mm negatives and masters of FILMED shows were stored off site. Shows which were produced on 2-inch videotape were burned up and are lost. Luckily, Universal didn't produce a great many shows on tape, but things like Don Adams Screen Test, for instance, is gone. The Jack Benny Show did some shows on film and some on 2-inch tape, and all of those tapes are lost. While Universal didn't produce any regular variety series, to the best of my knowledge, they did do specials and those are destroyed as well.
    I haven't heard about some of the little failed sitcoms that they did on tape, such as Sirota's Court and Semi-Tough, but I'm assuming those are burned up too.

    I know it's unlikely there will ever be an official accounting of exactly what was/was not lost in that fire — just thinking about the music is staggering — but is there any kind of list of Universal (or Universal-owned) series which were produced on video?

  51. ClassicTVMan1981X

    And if the 2nd season of Quincy, M.E. were packaged that way, then to me that would be:
    DISC 1:
    2×01: "Snake Eyes" (parts 1-2) (2/4/77)
    2×02: "…The Thigh Bone's Connected to the Knee Bone" (2/11/77)
    2×03: "Visitors in Paradise" (2/18/77)

    DISC 2:
    2×04: "The Two Sides of the Truth" (2/25/77)
    2×05: "Hit and Run at Danny's" (3/11/77)
    2×06: "Has Anybody Here Seen Quincy?" (3/18/77)

    DISC 3:
    2×07: "A Good Smack in the Mouth" (4/15/77)
    2×08: "The Hot Dog Murder" (4/22/77)
    2×09: "An Unfriendly Radiance" (4/29/77)

    DISC 4:
    2×10: "Sullied Be Thy Name" (5/6/77)
    2×11: "Valleyview" (5/13/77)
    2×12: "Let Me Light the Way" (5/27/77)

    ~Ben

    I know I'm beating a dead horse here but all those episodes are first season (1976-77) regardless of Universal's packaging.

  52. Wiseguy

    I know I'm beating a dead horse here but all those episodes are first season (1976-77) regardless of Universal's packaging.

    The 1976 episodes were all 90 minutes long as they originally were part of that season's edition of NBC's Mystery Movie wheel. You are right though that all of these aired that same season. Therefore, these early 1977 episodes would make up discs three to six.

    ~Ben

  53. ClassicTVMan1981X

    The 1976 episodes were all 90 minutes long as they originally were part of that season's edition of NBC's Mystery Movie wheel. You are right though that both of these sets of episodes aired that same season. Therefore, these early 1977 episodes would make up discs three to six.

    ~Ben

    "The Thigh Bone's Connected to the Knee Bone" (the second "Quincy" episode) was also 90 minutes and the 2-hour Quincy series premiere "Snake Eyes" (perhaps originally intended to be 90 minutes) were probably also intended to be broadcast on the NBC Mystery Movie series but held over when it was decided to make Quincy a separate series so it was silly for Universal to separate the episodes into two groups. The fact that actress Lynette Mettey appears in the above episodes and disappears when the hour episodes started supports that theory.

  54. Ed Lachmann

    Just hoping and praying that Kino, who has a great history with 50's movie fans like me, will consider Bachelor Father for us old timers if they somehow get the go ahead. Just loved that show!

    I do too, but somehow I doubt they would even consider that show .
    My guess is that it will be Kolchak, Buck Rogers and or Night Gallery on Bluray .

  55. LouA

    I do too, but somehow I doubt they would even consider that show .
    My guess is that it will be Kolchak, Buck Rogers and or Night Gallery on Bluray .

    I hope James Michener's Centennial (1978-1979) will also get the Blu-Ray treatment!

    The only known NTSC (Region 1) DVD release of it, in 2008, was through Universal Studios Home Entertainment and all 12 episodes lack the 1977 Universal Television logo at the end, instead going for the 1997 Universal Pictures opening logo before the opening credits. If this miniseries ever is released on Blu-Ray, the 1997 Universal logo should be removed and the original 1977 Universal TV closing logo (y'know… what you guys see on stuff like The Rockford Files or Murder, She Wrote) restored on all 12 parts.

    ~Ben

  56. Flashgear

    If KL might do a longer running Universal TV series, I might hope for McCloud…only a re-edited season one with the uncut season two were released in R1 DVD…Madman released the other 6 seasons in R4 locked DVD.

    You mean other 5 seasons? There were only 7 seasons.

  57. Mark Y

    Regarding "Sixth Sense" — those were syndicated as part of "Night Gallery" in edited form with new wraparounds by Rod Serling. Any interest in those, maybe as extras on a Night Gallery or Sixth Sense set?

    I thought those hacked-up half-hours were atrocious. Interesting to see ONE just as a lesson on how to butcher a tv show. BTW there was a Sixth Sense DVD set issued in Europe; from what I've seen of it here and there it's in English with optional subtitles so a universal player would be required.

    View attachment 67876

  58. Mark Y

    Regarding "Sixth Sense" — those were syndicated as part of "Night Gallery" in edited form with new wraparounds by Rod Serling. Any interest in those, maybe as extras on a Night Gallery or Sixth Sense set?

    Sixth Sense came out in France, as well as having run here in original one hour form on the Chiller Channel, although they did exclude a couple of episodes.

  59. DeWilson

    There Was a reedited movie version?

    Yes, called Confessions of a D.A., combining 4 episodes of the show. Universal tried to squeeze every possible dime out of their failed series. I don't feel like digging the list out, but if there was a Universal show that lasted a season or less, and was in color, they put together one or two "movies" combining episodes. Fay, The DA, Matt Lincoln, The Psychiatrist, Man and the City, Turnabout, Sara, The Outsider, Road West, Kolchak, Get Christie Love, Toma, Pistols and Petticoats, The Partners, Mr. Terrific, etc.

    Here's a great write-up on this: https://classictvhistory.wordpress.com/2012/02/25/procrustes-comes-to-syndication/

  60. I wonder what Chances there might be of getting a license to release complete season sets of the original Dragnet series (1951-1958) from Jack Webb’s estate? I know there are some that have been released but I’ve never seen season sets

  61. Neil Brock

    Yes, called Confessions of a D.A., combining 4 episodes of the show. Universal tried to squeeze every possible dime out of their failed series. I don't feel like digging the list out, but if there was a Universal show that lasted a season or less, and was in color, they put together one or two "movies" combining episodes. Fay, The DA, Matt Lincoln, The Psychiatrist, Man and the City, Turnabout, Sara, The Outsider, Road West, Kolchak, Get Christie Love, Toma, Pistols and Petticoats, The Partners, Mr. Terrific, etc.

    Here's a great write-up on this: https://classictvhistory.wordpress.com/2012/02/25/procrustes-comes-to-syndication/

    Yes, I'm well aware of Universal's practice of cutting episodes of short lived TV Shows into features. 🙂

  62. mark-edk

    I thought those hacked-up half-hours were atrocious. Interesting to see ONE just as a lesson on how to butcher a tv show. BTW there was a Sixth Sense DVD set issued in Europe; from what I've seen of it here and there it's in English with optional subtitles so a universal player would be required.

    View attachment 67876

    Here's what hurts even more – those were edited to fit a half hour slot before commercials in the 1970's – 25 minutes – then they were reedited to be shorter for modern syndication needs – 22 minutes,30 seconds – and keep in mind they had Rod's introductions added.

  63. Wiseguy

    I know I'm beating a dead horse here but all those episodes are first season (1976-77) regardless of Universal's packaging.

    So basically, the third through eighth-and-final seasons are really the second through seventh-and-final-seasons?

  64. The Kino Insider mentioned earlier this week on another forum that the Universal TV series they are releasing on blu has already had a DVD release. That quashes a good number of the guesses/hopes on this thread – at least for now.

  65. Larry.P

    The Kino Insider mentioned earlier this week on another forum that the Universal TV series they are releasing on blu has already had a DVD release.

    So the question that comes to mind is: what are the Universal series with a past DVD release?

    Ironside
    It Takes a Thief
    McCloud
    Rod Serling's Night Gallery

    Columbo
    McMillan & Wife
    Banacek
    The Six Million Dollar Man
    Kolchak: The Night Stalker
    The Invisible Man
    Baa Baa Black Sheep

    The Bionic Woman

  66. Technically, one of my predictions earlier in this thread could still possibly be valid… the short-run horror anthology series, Darkroom (1981-82), had gotten a legit, licensed DVD release in Australia, almost a decade ago, via Madman Entertainment.

    [​IMG]

  67. Larry.P

    The Kino Insider mentioned earlier this week on another forum that the Universal TV series they are releasing on blu has already had a DVD release. That quashes a good number of the guesses/hopes on this thread – at least for now.

    didnt mill creek already do that? I was able to get Knight Rider on Blu from them

  68. Well if we have to go by previous on DVD releases than it's either going to be "Night Gallery" or "Amazing Stories" (which never had a second season release in the US). "Columbo" would be great with bells and whistles.

  69. BobO’Link

    With that in mind – and going solely on "classic" TV – I'm guessing either The Munsters or Northern Exposure. The Munsters is short and likely would sell well plus I've purchased it twice on DVD (several things I've purchased multiple times on DVD have received BR releases). Northern Exposure could benefit from a new release with all the music intact.

    They've said they don't have THE MUNSTERS.

  70. If they are only permitted, at this time, to do re-releases, I'd like to see them tackle…
    McCloud (1970-1977)
    McMillan (and Wife) (1971-1977)
    James A. Michener's Centennial (miniseries, 1978-1979)
    Miami Vice (1984-1990)
    Charles in Charge (1984-1985, 1987-1990)

    ~Ben

  71. Northern Exposure already has an essentially perfect UK Blu-Ray release. Kino couldn’t top that and I don’t see why they’d try. Shows that aren’t available on Blu-Ray worldwide are much more profitable than ones that are.

  72. BobO’Link

    With that in mind – and going solely on "classic" TV – I'm guessing either The Munsters or Northern Exposure. The Munsters is short and likely would sell well plus I've purchased it twice on DVD (several things I've purchased multiple times on DVD have received BR releases). Northern Exposure could benefit from a new release with all the music intact.

    They said they don't have the Munsters .

  73. David Weicker

    Ellery Queen is also an option

    That would be nice because the DVD botched the pilot movie by playing the Mystery Movie music over the titles instead of the proper title music by Elmer Bernstein.

  74. I don't have the DVDs, but clearing the music for Northern Exposure on Blu-ray for a NA release would be costly, so that probably rules it out (unless they go with whatever the DVDs used/omitted)–the UK has different music copyright laws, so it's a not an issue for home video releases. Many TV shows have been ruled out, so I'm going to repeat my guess that it's Buck Rogers or Amazing Stories.

  75. HenryDuBrow

    Just for the hell of it, another (Universal related) pipe dream:

    Nobody’s Perfect

    Owen Marshall

    O’Hara, U.S. Treasury

    Sierra

    Griff

    Jigsaw

    Lucas Tanner

    Tenafly

    Hec Ramsey

    Baretta

    Pipe Dreams:

    Little Women (1979 TV-Series)…since Little Women seems to be all the rage yet again

    Fay

    Faraday And Company

    Toma

    McNaughton's Daughter

    Rosetti And Ryan

  76. Peter M Fitzgerald

    Technically, one of my predictions earlier in this thread could still possibly be valid… the short-run horror anthology series, Darkroom (1981-82), had gotten a legit, licensed DVD release in Australia, almost a decade ago, via Madman Entertainment.

    Nope. The insider said the show they are releasing had a previous US DVD release.

  77. Larry.P

    Nope. The insider said the show they are releasing had a previous US DVD release.

    Thanks for the clarification. Sounds like whatever the show is, I either already have it (Thriller, Johnny Staccato, Dragnet, Columbo, It Takes a Thief) or have no interest in it (most likely the latter)… unless it's a 'remastered-from-vault-elements' release of something previously released by Timeless (using old collectors' prints), like Soldiers of Fortune, M-Squad, 87th Precinct or Checkmate.

  78. JamesSmith

    Was that the tv version with William Shatner?

    James

    Shatner was in the 2-part mini-series that acted as the pilot for the 1979 series, but he did not appear in the regular 1-hour episodes when it went to series.

  79. Mark Y

    I know it's unlikely there will ever be an official accounting of exactly what was/was not lost in that fire — just thinking about the music is staggering — but is there any kind of list of Universal (or Universal-owned) series which were produced on video?

    For sitcoms, the only one I can think of is Charles in Charge. They only own the North American rights to Gimme A Break! and Kate & Allie and the syndication rights to Amen which hasn't even been tried on DVD. Those were all on tape, and with any luck the original network masters were stored nowhere near Universal City. Major Dad and Coach were produced by Universal, shot on film, and edited on tape.

    MCA TV did a videotaped syndicated TV music competition in the 1980s called Puttin' on the Hits, which will likely never be released because of the costs of music licensing.

  80. MatthewA

    For sitcoms, the only one I can think of is Charles in Charge. They only own the North American rights to Gimme A Break! and Kate & Allie and the syndication rights to Amen which hasn't even been tried on DVD. Those were all on tape, and with any luck the original network masters were stored nowhere near Universal City. Major Dad and Coach were produced by Universal, shot on film, and edited on tape.

    MCA TV did a videotaped syndicated TV music competition in the 1980s called Puttin' on the Hits, which will likely never be released because of the costs of music licensing.

    Domestic Life was another videotaped sitcom Universal did (with Steve Martin, through his company 40 Share Productions, Inc.), dating from 1984, but only 10 episodes aired.

    ~Ben

  81. ClassicTVMan1981X

    Domestic Life was another videotaped sitcom Universal did (with Steve Martin, through his company 40 Share Productions, Inc.), dating from 1984, but only 10 episodes aired.

    ~Ben

    Several others that come to mind are Family Man, Together We Stand, and Nothing Is Easy.

  82. MatthewA

    MCA TV did a videotaped syndicated TV music competition in the 1980s called Puttin' on the Hits, which will likely never be released because of the costs of music licensing.

    And IIRC, that show also had the late Chris Bearde and the late Dick Clark behind it as well (MCA being on distribution, with that "MCA TV Exclusive Distributor" logo on it).

  83. The Munsters Today (the 1987-1991 color reboot) was shot on video. I wondered if it perished in the fire? I remember watching it at the time and thinking how dreadful and inferior it was compared to the original, but I just watched an episode on youtube, and I guess it's not so bad if one had no knowledge of the original series. Certainly not any worse than Sabrina the Teenage Witch (the Melissa Joan Hart series). I think it was aimed at younger viewers who wouldn't watch the old black and white TV show.

  84. bmasters9

    So basically, the third through eighth-and-final seasons are really the second through seventh-and-final-seasons?

    Yes, there were seven seasons, 1976-83. For the Fall premiere of each season, the (real) TV Guide listed it as the series premiere (1976), 2nd season premiere (1977) through the 7th season premiere (1982).

  85. Neil Brock

    Yes, called Confessions of a D.A., combining 4 episodes of the show. Universal tried to squeeze every possible dime out of their failed series. I don't feel like digging the list out, but if there was a Universal show that lasted a season or less, and was in color, they put together one or two "movies" combining episodes. Fay, The DA, Matt Lincoln, The Psychiatrist, Man and the City, Turnabout, Sara, The Outsider, Road West, Kolchak, Get Christie Love, Toma, Pistols and Petticoats, The Partners, Mr. Terrific, etc.

    Here's a great write-up on this: https://classictvhistory.wordpress.com/2012/02/25/procrustes-comes-to-syndication/

    I remember watching the 2-hour Partners movie with Don Adams. I thought it odd that at least one 30-minute episode still had the laugh track while the others didn't.

    Universal isn't the only studio to do this. Fox has released Time Tunnel movies, at least one Cade's County movie (Glenn Ford), ITC did Space: 1999 movies, etc.

  86. DeWilson

    Here's what hurts even more – those were edited to fit a half hour slot before commercials in the 1970's – 25 minutes – then they were reedited to be shorter for modern syndication needs – 22 minutes,30 seconds – and keep in mind they had Rod's introductions added.

    I didn't watch the original version regularly but I understand that in a couple of episodes Gary Collins only made a token appearance. In these episodes the Night Gallery version edited him out completely; he doesn't even get a credit.

    By the way, Sixth Sense isn't the only hour series to be edited down to half-hour. I remember a half-hour syndicated version of Sheriff Lobo. There were probably others.

  87. Wiseguy

    Yes, there were seven seasons, 1976-83. For the Fall premiere of each season, the (real) TV Guide listed it as the series premiere (1976), 2nd season premiere (1977) through the 7th season premiere (1982).

    If that so be, then why did Universal have it where the first season was divided into two, per the labeling (with Shout! following on from that)?

  88. bmasters9

    If that so be, then why did Universal have it where the first season was divided into two, per the labeling (with Shout! following on from that)?

    It's due to the 90-minute specials not airing as frequent in syndication as what came after.

    ~Ben

  89. Ron Lee Green

    The Munsters Today (the 1987-1991 color reboot) was shot on video. I wondered if it perished in the fire? I remember watching it at the time and thinking how dreadful and inferior it was compared to the original, but I just watched an episode on youtube, and I guess it's not so bad if one had no knowledge of the original series. Certainly not any worse than Sabrina the Teenage Witch (the Melissa Joan Hart series). I think it was aimed at younger viewers who wouldn't watch the old black and white TV show.

    If any show deserves to burn up, that would be the one!

    Others I know of which were burned up are Don Adams Screen Test, all of the videotaped Jack Benny Programs. He did a mixture of filmed shows and taped show each season. There's likely kinescopes of those taped shows but the 2-inch masters are gone. Also, Universal produced a number of one-off variety specials over the years and those are gone.

  90. Ron Lee Green

    The Munsters Today (the 1987-1991 color reboot) was shot on video. I wondered if it perished in the fire? I remember watching it at the time and thinking how dreadful and inferior it was compared to the original, but I just watched an episode on youtube, and I guess it's not so bad if one had no knowledge of the original series. Certainly not any worse than Sabrina the Teenage Witch (the Melissa Joan Hart series). I think it was aimed at younger viewers who wouldn't watch the old black and white TV show.

    I'm pretty sure that the show is still around as it was offered on Hulu several years ago (ca 2012).

  91. Neil Brock

    I'm kidding but that's by far the worst show I've ever seen. Munsters Today makes My Mother The Car look like Masterpiece Theatre.

    Is MONSTERS TODAY officially gone, or did back-up copies turn up somewhere?

  92. Neil Brock

    If any show deserves to burn up, that would be the one!

    Others I know of which were burned up are Don Adams Screen Test, all of the videotaped Jack Benny Programs. He did a mixture of filmed shows and taped show each season. There's likely kinescopes of those taped shows but the 2-inch masters are gone. Also, Universal produced a number of one-off variety specials over the years and those are gone.

    I think a kine of one or two of the VT Jack Benny Programs did turn up on that official box set a few years ago.

  93. Ron Lee Green

    The Munsters Today (the 1987-1991 color reboot) was shot on video. I wondered if it perished in the fire? I remember watching it at the time and thinking how dreadful and inferior it was compared to the original, but I just watched an episode on youtube, and I guess it's not so bad if one had no knowledge of the original series. Certainly not any worse than Sabrina the Teenage Witch (the Melissa Joan Hart series). I think it was aimed at younger viewers who wouldn't watch the old black and white TV show.

    Well, when I was a kid, I watched the original on WTBS and skipped the new one. On videotape and in color, it lacked the atmosphere of the original. And also, Fred Gwynne and Al Lewis were still alive and apparently wanted no part of it. That was disappointing when you consider that Universal could get practically all the surviving Leave it to Beaver cast back together. Except their show was not reliant on special effects or heavy make-up. This show was built around them being frozen in time and then being unfrozen in the 1980s, yet they all looked different since they were all recasts! Even my 5-year-old mind thought, "that's not Grandpa Munster, that's Officer Simpson from Gimme A Break!"*

    I doubt there would have been as many first-run syndicated shows in the late 1980s had the networks not gotten so cancellation-happy in the late 1970s and had a series of industry strikes not torpedoed several potential hits.

    But I will say this for them: they actually ran a year longer than the original (was that because of a contractual obligation from the stations that aired it?) while Bryan Fuller's recent attempt to re-reboot it as Mockingbird Lane went nowhere.

    *Similarly, Fred Gwynne was the original choice for George Gaynes' role of Henry Warnimont on Punky Brewster. Soleil Moon Frye was already cast, and when the producers paired them together in a screen test, he couldn't hold it together when she said "hey, aren't you Herman Munster"? This is actually in Brandon Tartikoff's autobiography: The Last Great Ride.

  94. MatthewA

    Well, when I was a kid, I watched the original on WTBS and skipped the new one. On videotape and in color, it lacked the atmosphere of the original. And also, Fred Gwynne and Al Lewis were still alive and apparently wanted no part of it. That was disappointing when you consider that Universal could get practically all the surviving Leave it to Beaver cast back together. Except their show was not reliant on special effects or heavy make-up. This show was built around them being frozen in time and then being unfrozen in the 1980s, yet they all looked different since they were all recasts! Even my 5-year-old mind thought, "that's not Grandpa Munster, that's Officer Simpson from Gimme A Break!"*

    I doubt there would have been as many first-run syndicated shows in the late 1980s had the networks not gotten so cancellation-happy in the late 1970s and had a series of industry strikes not torpedoed several potential hits.

    But I will say this for them: they actually ran a year longer than the original (was that because of a contractual obligation from the stations that aired it?) while Bryan Fuller's recent attempt to re-reboot it as Mockingbird Lane went nowhere.

    *Similarly, Fred Gwynne was the original choice for George Gaynes' role of Henry Warnimont on Punky Brewster. Soleil Moon Frye was already cast, and when the producers paired them together in a screen test, he couldn't hold it together when she said "hey, aren't you Herman Munster"? This is actually in Brandon Tartikoff's autobiography: The Last Great Ride.

    Fred Gwynne wanting nothing to do with the new series shouldn't come as a surprise as the man almost nearly detested anything having to do with the Munsters. Al Lewis, on the other hand, embraced his association with the series, and I thought that I read somewhere that he was upset that Universal didn't approach him for the show. Since he was doing his Grandpa character for hosting duties on TBS's Saturday morning B horror movie airings, I wouldn't put it past him to do a new Munsters series, quality control issues and all.

    When the show was streaming on Hulu around eight years ago (early 2010s), I watched a few episodes and to say that it was a pale imitation of the original would be giving it a compliment. Oddly enough, due to its late 1980s styling, it actually felt more dated compared to the fairly timeless 1960s original.

  95. Jack P

    Personally, I prefer to think of Fred Gwynne as Officer Francis Muldoon!

    Wow! He’ll always be Herman Munster to me.

    Gary “the Munsters was underrated in my opinion – in my personal Top 25 Favorites of all time” O.

  96. My first exposure was Munsters, but once I saw Car 54 I was hooked. My favorite written sitcom of this era along with the Dick Van Dyke Show.

    And this image of him from the Christmas episode just puts me on the floor completely (in response to the dumbest thing Gunther Toody ever said!)

    [​IMG]

  97. Neil Brock

    I'm kidding but that's by far the worst show I've ever seen. Munsters Today makes My Mother The Car look like Masterpiece Theatre.

    Ah! I thought you quite literally wished for it to burn up (another figment of my autistic mind taking things literally).

  98. I can remember when I (unwisely) saw "Fatal Attraction" and when he shows up in one scene I could literally hear the buzz in the audience going "It's Herman Munster!"

    If you want to sample some of his lesser-known work, he did a lot of "CBS Radio Mystery Theater" shows in the late 70s and all of those are on-line.

  99. Jack P

    … and when he shows up in one scene I could literally hear the buzz in the audience going "It's Herman Munster!"

    Which, I'm sure, is the reason he reportedly detested The Munsters. Typecasting like that (especially decades ago) can torpedo a career really fast. He fared better than most who get typecast, but I'm sure he missed out on a lot of roles because of that show.

    My guess, though, is he probably had more of a love/hate relationship with it, rather than out and out resentment. Typecasting sucks, but being well-know for something that people like is good. Supposedly, he said this (in 1979): I was very lucky and it was great fun to be as much of a household product as something like Rinso. I almost wish I could do it all over again.

  100. bmasters9

    If that so be, then why did Universal have it where the first season was divided into two, per the labeling (with Shout! following on from that)?

    Possibly Universal wanted to dupe consumers into thinking they were getting more than they really were (Two seasons at the price of one!). Or just another example of Universal's bungling in their DVD releases.

    Other examples:
    Replacing the original Ellery Queen pilot theme with the NBC Mystery Movie theme. (In the original broadcast they were separate.) Also, using the syndicated version of the pilot titled "Too Many Suspects." The original was only titled "Ellery Queen." And for some reason the Universal logo, the last chance to hear the 1974-75 logo music, was silent.

    There were three 90-minute Rockford Files, the pilot, the first season "This Case is Closed" and the fifth season "The Man Who Saw the Alligators." The pilot had originally been released on VHs where a new stereo-recorded theme replaced the original and all commercial breaks were edited out to make it look like a real movie with no breaks. Some surrounding music and a freeze frame of guest star Lindsay Wagner were also edited out. From reports I've heard, this is the version that is on the DVD. Since the syndicated version was expanded into a two-parter (with obviously different edits and extraneous scenes added) this was the only chance to see the original as it originally aired. Likewise "This Case Is Closed" was also expanded into a two-parter for syndication and this was the version included on the DVD. Another blown chance to see the original. "The Man Who Saw the Alligators" started as an hour episode, was expanded to 90 minutes before the original broadcast then edited back to an hour for syndication. It is unknown whether the syndication version is the same as the originally-intended hour episode and after the treatment of the other two episodes I never bothered to discover what version(s) is included on the fifth-season DVD.

    Besides not releasing the final four years of Alfred Hitchcock's series in the USA, the series is very inconsistent. Some episodes feature the American version of Hitchcock's remarks, while some apparently feature the British ones (my favorite in the episode "Nightmare in 4D" when the announcer only allowed Hitchcock to say one word ("a word from our producer") before switching to a commercial is not on the DVD but can be seen on the MeTV broadcast.)
    Some episodes allow Hitchcock to mention the commercials while other have his comments edited since there are no commercials on home video. A couple of episodes have the Bristol-Myers sponsorship displayed on the opening credits.
    One episode ("Your Witness") has a "phony" closing theme like what used to be heard on Nick-at-Nite reruns.
    Even in the original syndication, some episodes of the 5th-6th season had an alternate theme that accompanied an announcer's mention of the sponsor (with the sponsor name crudely cut out). Of course, this theme is not included at all on the DVD.
    One episode ("Sybilla") has the new closing theme inexplicably changing to the old closing theme right in the middle!
    Some episodes have the middle bumper included (the AH caricature) while most edit it out. A couple of episodes, including the premiere, have the complete music of the bumper but the video remains black.
    After Revue switched to a separate logo at the end, many episodes feature the logo while many others have it cut off.
    One episode (the fifth season's "Specialty of the House") includes the new Revue logo even before it was originally broadcast in the sixth season. The Revue logo was already seen during the closing credits.
    Many episodes feature a closing theme that doesn't end but just fades out. Although it may have been originally broadcast that way, it sounds phony.
    In the series' only three part episode "I Killed the Count" in parts 2 and 3 Hitchcock returns after the commercial break to explain what happened in the previous episode. Apparently, parts of both the British and American recaps are included with the first one cut off in the middle and another version following with him saying the same thing slightly different.

  101. ClassicTVMan1981X

    It's due to the 90-minute specials not airing as frequent in syndication as what came after.

    ~Ben

    Back in the 1980s I saw Quincy in syndication on a local station and all five ninety-minute episodes were edited down to an hour. I don't see any reason why they wouldn't have been shown as often as the others. On networks such as CBS (The CBS Late Movie) and MeTV (in 2015) the original 90-minute version was shown.

  102. Arthur Powell

    Fred Gwynne wanting nothing to do with the new series shouldn't come as a surprise as the man almost nearly detested anything having to do with the Munsters. Al Lewis, on the other hand, embraced his association with the series, and I thought that I read somewhere that he was upset that Universal didn't approach him for the show. Since he was doing his Grandpa character for hosting duties on TBS's Saturday morning B horror movie airings, I wouldn't put it past him to do a new Munsters series, quality control issues and all. .

    As for Al Lewis – I heard two stories related to "The Munsters Today" – one is they actually wanted him to AUDITION for the role – can you believe that – and the other is they didn't want to use him due to his advanced age and insurance issues.

  103. Wiseguy

    On networks such as CBS (The CBS Late Movie) and MeTV (in 2015) the original 90-minute version was shown.

    I remember that CBS Late Movie (and its 1980s successor, CBS Late Night); both, IIRC, were potpourri showcases of practically anything on, including stuff from the other networks (for instance, Hart to Hart, albeit a show that was on rival network ABC, was seen on CBS Late Night from time to time).

    Also, CBS Late Night reran the final go of O-R Jack Lord Five-O (1979-80), under the rerun-exclusive title McGarrett.

    Here's the opening thereto:

    And the title card:

    View attachment 68594

  104. ClassicTVMan1981X

    I wonder if they might release the short-lived 1979 series, Delta House, based upon the movie Animal House?

    ~Ben

    The criteria/hint they’ve stated is that it’s a Blu-ray release of a short run series that Universal had previously issued themselves on DVD in the United States.

    I’m not familiar with Delta House so I’m not sure if it’s been on DVD in the U.S.

  105. Josh Steinberg

    The criteria/hint they’ve stated is that it’s a Blu-ray release of a short run series that Universal had previously issued themselves on DVD in the United States.

    I’m not familiar with Delta House so I’m not sure if it’s been on DVD in the U.S.

    Along with Co-Ed Fever (MGM Television/CBS) and Brothers and Sisters (Paramount Television/NBC), it was a series centered on a frat-house party, but unfortunately such a setting could not get past the censors at the Standards and Practices, so all three were off the air after a short time. But I still hope they will be on DVD nonetheless!

    ~Ben

  106. DeWilson

    As for Al Lewis – I heard two stories related to "The Munsters Today" – one is they actually wanted him to AUDITION for the role – can you believe that – and the other is they didn't want to use him due to his advanced age and insurance issues.

    Al Lewis was only two years older than Howard Morton (who, ironically, predeceased him), so I don't buy that explanation. Most likely they wanted an all-new cast regardless of whether any originals wanted in even though Lewis, Gwynne, and Yvonne DeCarlo all did a reunion movie together in 1981.

  107. I've got to say that if the KL offering, upgraded to Blu, is either of Kolchak or Night Gallery, I'm not interested. I'm quite happy with my original Universal DVDs for both series, since they are the one-sided reissues. I'm almost certain that it is Kolchak, with Night Gallery following on at some point. I've also got to say that I'm disappointed, but would be happy for those fans that would want them on Blu. I continue to hold out some hope that KL might give us a vintage American TV series, something new to disc…as to quote the KL insider, "maybe more"…

  108. I hope whatever it is sells enough to make it possible for them to continue to dip their toes into those waters. They’ve been doing a great job on the movie side of putting stuff out that hasn’t seen the light of day in ages and that’s been a treat.

  109. Flashgear

    I've got to say that if the KL offering, upgraded to Blu, is either of Kolchak or Night Gallery, I'm not interested. I'm quite happy with my original Universal DVDs for both series, since they are the one-sided reissues. I'm almost certain that it is Kolchak, with Night Gallery following on at some point. I've also got to say that I'm disappointed, but would be happy for those fans that would want them on Blu. I continue to hold out some hope that KL might give us a vintage American TV series, something new to disc…as to quote the KL insider, "maybe more"…


    • I wish it was true. Kolchak is on my BD wishlist.
    • One HTF member asserts that Kolchak was already selected by another company.

    •​
  110. Flashgear

    I've got to say that if the KL offering, upgraded to Blu, is either of Kolchak or Night Gallery, I'm not interested. I'm quite happy with my original Universal DVDs for both series, since they are the one-sided reissues. I'm almost certain that it is Kolchak, with Night Gallery following on at some point. I've also got to say that I'm disappointed, but would be happy for those fans that would want them on Blu. I continue to hold out some hope that KL might give us a vintage American TV series, something new to disc…as to quote the KL insider, "maybe more"…

    If Kolchak is ever offered on blu, I hope the first few episodes opening credits are corrected to show The Night Stalker as the title, before Kolchak was added to it. The UK DVD release is correct, the US release is just the same opening credits tacked onto every episode. The first episode (The Ripper) opening credits has a slightly different version of the music also.

  111. I think Kino-Lorber should re-do Quincy, M.E.'s first season box, so the contents are arranged like this…

    All episodes on discs one and two are 90 minutes long, and originally aired as part of NBC's Mystery Movie series.

    Disc 1
    1. "Go Fight City Hall… to the Death" (10/3/76)
    2. "Who's Who in Neverland?" (10/10/76)

    Disc 2
    3. "A Star is Dead" (11/28/76)
    4. "Hot Ice, Cold Hearts" (1/2/77)

    All episodes on discs three to six are 1 hour long, except where noted.

    Disc 3
    5. "Snake Eyes" (official season 1 premiere) (2 hrs.) (2/4/77)
    6. "…The Thigh Bone's Connected to the Knee Bone…" (90 mins.) (2/11/77)

    Disc 4
    7. "Visitors in Paradise" (2/18/77)
    8. "The Two Sides of the Truth" (2/25/77)
    9. "Hit and Run at Danny's" (3/11/77)
    10. "Has Anybody Here Seen Quincy?" (3/18/77)

    Disc 5
    11. "A Good Smack in the Mouth" (4/15/77)
    12. "The Hot Dog Murder" (4/22/77)
    13. "An Unfriendly Radiance" (4/29/77)

    Disc 6
    14. "Sullied Be Thy Name" (5/6/77)
    15. "Valleyview" (5/13/77)
    16. "Let Me Light the Way" (5/27/77)

    ~Ben

  112. I think Kino-Lorber should re-do Quincy, M.E.'s first season box, so the contents are arranged like this…

    All episodes on discs one and two are 90 minutes long, and originally aired as part of NBC's Mystery Movie series.

    Disc 1
    1. "Go Fight City Hall… to the Death" (10/3/76)
    2. "Who's Who in Neverland?" (10/10/76)

    Disc 2
    3. "A Star is Dead" (11/28/76)
    4. "Hot Ice, Cold Hearts" (1/2/77)

    All episodes on discs three to six are 1 hour long, except where noted.

    Disc 3
    5. "Snake Eyes" (official season 1 premiere) (2 hrs.) (2/4/77)
    6. "…The Thigh Bone's Connected to the Knee Bone…" (90 mins.) (2/11/77)

    Disc 4
    7. "Visitors in Paradise" (2/18/77)
    8. "The Two Sides of the Truth" (2/25/77)
    9. "Hit and Run at Danny's" (3/11/77)
    10. "Has Anybody Here Seen Quincy?" (3/18/77)

    Disc 5
    11. "A Good Smack in the Mouth" (4/15/77)
    12. "The Hot Dog Murder" (4/22/77)
    13. "An Unfriendly Radiance" (4/29/77)

    Disc 6
    14. "Sullied Be Thy Name" (5/6/77)
    15. "Valleyview" (5/13/77)
    16. "Let Me Light the Way" (5/27/77)

    ~Ben

  113. Josh Steinberg

    I hope whatever it is sells enough to make it possible for them to continue to dip their toes into those waters. They’ve been doing a great job on the movie side of putting stuff out that hasn’t seen the light of day in ages and that’s been a treat.

    Agreed. Kino has done a nice job on the few TV series they've released so far: Coronet Blue on DVD and The Outer Limits and The Master on Blu. Looking forward to their next TV offering…

    Flashgear

    I've got to say that if the KL offering, upgraded to Blu, is either of Kolchak or Night Gallery, I'm not interested. I'm quite happy with my original Universal DVDs for both series, since they are the one-sided reissues. I'm almost certain that it is Kolchak, with Night Gallery following on at some point. I've also got to say that I'm disappointed, but would be happy for those fans that would want them on Blu. I continue to hold out some hope that KL might give us a vintage American TV series, something new to disc…as to quote the KL insider, "maybe more"…

    I'm with you on Night Gallery, Randall…but if Kino ever do release Kolchak: The Night Stalker on Blu-Ray, I'll be all over that like a pack of hounds on a T-bone.

  114. ClassicTVMan1981X

    …Disc 3
    5. "Snake Eyes" (official season 1 premiere) (2 hrs.) (2/4/77)
    6. "…The Thigh Bone's Connected to the Knee Bone…" (90 mins.) (2/11/77)…

    I often wondered if "Snake Eyes" was shot for a 90 minute slot (75 minutes) and then had 20 odd minutes of footage added (95 minutes) to fill a two-hour slot. It was unusual by this time for the "Mystery Movies" to be odd lengths.

    It's clear the first 6 QUINCY, ME episodes were shot for the "Mystery Movie" format.

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