HTF Podcast Episode #2: Defining Home Theater

In this episode of The Home Theater Forum Podcast hosts Brian Dobbs and Sam Posten dig into just what defines a modern home theater. They talk about the history of home theater from the 1950s onward, then narrow down the definition to a specific space designed for the critical appreciation of movies, regardless of the room’s cost, size, or technology.

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  1. Catching up on my podcast listening, delayed by holidays and end of year travel, I listened to HTF #2 today. Really enjoyed it! One of those podcasts where I'm wanting to jump in and add my two cents worth! 🙂 I've got other thoughts, I'll try to chime in more, later.

  2. Miscellaneous thoughts:

    • CEDIA's criteria is a "home cinema" is a dedicated theater room, while a "media room" is a mixed-use room with video display and other features like a wetbar or gaming space. I think that's a helpful distinction, though I don't hold to it. My view is that any any space dedicated to enjoying media (movies, TV, etc) is a "home theater". I don't think a living room is a "home theater", but like beauty, these things are defined by the eye of the beholder.
    • I disagree that THX is a reputable brand these days. THX sold off their brand reputation the past 20 years.
    • Those of us with 4:3 HDTV CRT weren't suckers 🙂 You forget that before there were widescreen CRT, there was the glorious 36" SONY WEGA. It had a true anamorphic mode to play DVD's in full widescreen glory. And was high-def, with component inputs. It was an evolutionary dead end, but that's how it goes. It's what was available around 2002.
    • Dolby Pro-Logic was a such a disappointment for surround sound enthusiasts. It promised so much, but delivered so little. The rear effects were so anemic it was always hard to tell if it was even working.
    • Movies certainly make the most of the 4k's and the dolby atmoses. But binging The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel on the 120" screen, relaxing in my recliner in the Catfisch Cinema, is utterly delightful. Modern shows like The Man in the High Castle or The Expanse absolutely merit better than TV speakers from a 40" LCD above the fireplace, 20 feet from the couch.
    • Dead on about projection being in a tough place these days. I think projection has always lagged direct view by a few years. But maybe because now I'm invested, it seems especially challenged by the UHD transition.

    That's good for now. Fun show. 🙂

  3. DaveF

    Dolby Pro-Logic was a such a disappointment for surround sound enthusiasts. It promised so much, but delivered so little. The rear effects were so anemic it was always hard to tell if it was even working.

    Totes!

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