Holiday Inn: 75th Anniversary Edition Blu-ray Review

Golden age classic is timeless entertainment. 4.5 Stars

A sure cure for what ails you, Mark Sandrich’s Holiday Inn is one of the classics of Hollywood’s golden age of musicals.

Holiday Inn (1942)
Released: 04 Sep 1942
Rated: PASSED
Runtime: 100 min
Director: Mark Sandrich
Genre: Comedy, Drama, Musical
Cast: Bing Crosby, Fred Astaire, Marjorie Reynolds, Virginia Dale
Writer(s): Claude Binyon (screenplay), Elmer Rice (adaptation), Irving Berlin (idea)
Plot: At an inn which is only open on holidays, a crooner and a hoofer vie for the affections of a beautiful up-and-coming performer.
IMDB rating: 7.6
MetaScore: N/A

Disc Information
Studio: Universal
Distributed By: N/A
Video Resolution: 1080P/AVC
Aspect Ratio: 1.37:1
Audio: English 2.0 DTS-HDMA
Subtitles: English SDH, Spanish, French
Rating: Not Rated
Run Time: 1 Hr. 41 Min.
Package Includes: Blu-ray, Digital Copy
Case Type: keep case in a slipcover
Disc Type: BD50 (dual layer)
Region: All
Release Date: 10/24/2017
MSRP: $14.99

The Production: 4/5

A sure cure for what ails you, Mark Sandrich’s Holiday Inn is one of the classics of Hollywood’s golden age of musicals. Filled to the brim with beautiful songs and featuring two of the most talented and likable leading men in the business at the time, Holiday Inn was a huge hit in its day, turned out a song that became the biggest seller of all time, and continues to enjoy enviable popularity seventy-five years after its initial release. This latest Blu-ray release of the film from Universal recycles the excellent high definition transfer from a previous release and all of the previous bonus material with one new addition that for some will make this inexpensively priced release one to double dip on.

Tired of the show business grind, crooner Jim Hardy (Bing Crosby) plans to break up his trio act and take his leading lady Lila Dixon (Virginia Dale) to live a quiet life on his newly purchased farm in Connecticut. Unknown to him, however, their dancing partner Ted Hanover (Fred Astaire) has his own plans for Lila, a club act for the two of them and eventually marriage. So, Jim leaves the business but finds farm labor is much more difficult than his show business background has prepared him for, so he gets another great idea: to turn his farm into an inn open only on the holidays with special shows centered on each special occasion. For a new partner, he casts show biz newcomer Linda Mason (Marjorie Reynolds, vocals by Martha Mears) and begins to fall in love with her, but after dancing drunkenly with Linda on New Year’s Eve after Lila dumps him, Ted decides Linda will be his new dance partner and begins plotting to steal her away from Ted’s lucrative Holiday Inn.

Based on an idea by songwriter Irving Berlin who provided twelve new holiday-based tunes for the movie along with his beloved chestnut “Easter Parade,” the screenplay by Claude Binyon provides a handy romantic and professional show biz tale on which to drape the sensational Irving Berlin songs, almost all of them showing the master at the top of his composing game with lilting melodies that seem amazingly familiar from almost the moment they’re first heard, a quality that Berlin possessed in his songwriting with very few other artists. Each major holiday gets its own song: “Kissing the Old Year Out” for December 31st, “Abraham” for Lincoln’s birthday (a number which included blackface in the minstrel tradition popular at the time), “Be Careful, It’s My Heart” for Valentine’s Day, “I Can’t Tell a Lie” for Washington’s birthday (the weak link of the score), “Say It with Firecrackers” and “Song of Freedom” for the 4th of July, “I’ve Got Plenty to Be Thankful For” for Thanksgiving, and, of course, “White Christmas” which won the Best Song Oscar for 1942 and went on to sell multiple millions of copies of the song on record and in sheet music. “Happy Holidays” and “Come to Holiday Inn” along with “Lazy” and “Easter Parade” also got featured placements. Because most of the numbers take place in the great room of the Holiday Inn, the production numbers are much smaller than in other Hollywood musicals of the era though, of course, Fred Astaire gets two trick numbers “Say It with Firecrackers” and a drunken dance with Marjorie Reynolds that are a bit more expansive, and Bing, Fred, and Virginia Dale get the movie off to a cracking start with “I’ll Capture Her Heart” setting up the personal and professional rivalry that is sustained throughout the movie. Mark Sandrich, who had directed some of Astaire’s most successful RKO musicals with Ginger Rogers, certainly guides the numbers here beautifully with the choppy holiday motif smoothed out wonderfully with his graceful transitions between the various celebrations.

This was the first teaming of Bing Crosby and Fred Astaire on film, and they proved to be a very enjoyable set of rivals (reunited four years later for another Irving Berlin musical Blue Skies, they basically played the same kinds of guys that they do here). Bing’s voice is at its zenith, and all of the numbers including the iconic “White Christmas” project that mellow richness and impeccable phrasing that was his hallmark. Fred Astaire’s dancing is up to his golden standards, too, with his able partnering of both Virginia Dale and Marjorie Reynolds as well as impressive solo dancing. Gorgeous Marjorie Reynolds may have been dubbed (skillfully; voice double Martha Mears was a superb match for her vocal timbre), but she proves herself to be a most agreeable leading lady, and her dancing with Astaire in “Be Careful, It’s My Heart” is among his greatest ballroom duets. Virginia Dale gets a bit short-changed in both acting and musical performing playing a rather selfish character who capriciously jumps from fella to fella with no seeming guilt, but she’s just fine in that opening number and a later nightclub dance with Astaire. Walter Abel gets several choice moments as Ted’s agitated, easily excitable agent Danny Reed, and Louise Beavers is always a joy to see in movies as inn cook Mamie.

Video: 5/5

3D Rating: NA

The film’s original 1.37:1 theatrical aspect ratio is faithfully delivered in this 1080p transfer using the AVC codec. Being the same transfer as the 2014 Blu-ray release, those familiar with it know it’s impeccably clean and sharp with an impressive grayscale that features excellent black levels and clear, pure whites. Contrast has been consistently applied for a first-rate visual experience. The movie has been divided into 18 chapters.

Audio: 4/5

The DTS-HD Master Audio 2.0 mono sound mix offers mostly clear sound with dialogue and lyrics nicely recorded and blended professionally with the Oscar-nominated orchestrations and ambient effects suitable for a film of this period. There is some soft hiss which can be heard in quieter scenes particularly early in the movie, but with so much music, it’s not noticeable for most of the picture.

Special Features: 5/5

Holiday Inn in Color (HD): the opening screen allows the viewer to choose either the original black and white or the colorized version of the movie. More natural here than earlier colorization attempts, a more pastel palette has been used through most of the film with bold color ignored for softer hues.

Audio Commentary: film historian Ken Barnes provides key information on the making of the film and also plays recorded comments from Fred Astaire, Bing Crosby, and others connected to the movie in this track which fans of the movie, if they haven’t heard it on previous DVD and Blu-ray releases, will be sure to want to listen to.

A Couple of Song and Dance Men (44:35, SD): historian Ken Barnes and Astaire’s daughter Ava Astaire McKenzie offer complementary biographical information on the careers of the two stars showing how their careers paralleled and occasionally crossed during their long decades in show business. Among trailer clips offered in the discussion are moments from King of Jazz, Dream House, The Big Broadcast, Dancing Lady, Top Hat, We’re Not Dressing, Road to Morocco, Blue Skies, Easter Parade, and High Society.

All-Singing, All-Dancing (7:15, SD): a brief discussion of how film musicals progressed from live stage performances to the use of prerecording vocals but live recording taps.

Coloring a Classic (8:51, SD): colorizer Barry Sandrew and his staff of professionals explain the process of colorizing Holiday Inn.

Theatrical Trailer (2:16, SD)

Irving Berlin’s Holiday Inn: The Broadway Musical (2:02:13, HD; DTS-HD MA 5.1): the 2015 Broadway adaptation of the film produced for BroadwayHD.com starring Bryce Pinkham, Corbin Bleu, Lora Lee Gayer, and Megan Sikora in the four leading roles. The film score has been supplemented by additional Irving Berlin standards from other sources including “Steppin’ Out With My Baby,” “The Little Things in Life,” “Blue Skies,” “Time Marches On,” “Heat Wave,” “It’s a Lovely Day Today,” “Shakin’ the Blues Away,” “Let’s Take an Old-Fashioned Walk,” and “Cheek to Cheek.” A very conventional and entertaining old-style Broadway musical. This is contained on a separate Blu-ray disc in the package.

Digital Copy: code sheet enclosed in the case.

Overall: 4.5/5

Holiday Inn is as good as it ever was with first-rate music and impressive performances from Bing Crosby and Fred Astaire. A genuine classic from Hollywood’s golden age has been brought to high definition with superb picture quality and good lossless sound. The major addition to this release, of course, is the recent Broadway musical version of the show offered on a separate Blu-ray disc in the set. Highly recommended!

Published by

Matt Hough

author,editor

43 Comments

  1. Thank you for the excellent review Matt.
    This is a real bargain for the package offered; I am particularly excited to have a copy of the recent Broadway musical included.

  2. Bernard McNair

    Thank you for the excellent review Matt.
    This is a real bargain for the package offered; I am particularly excited to have a copy of the recent Broadway musical included.

    It's worth the double dip, in my opinion.

  3. battlebeast

    Is this a paramount picture released and owned by Universial?

    I wonder if Universal has any plans to release GOING MY WAY…

    Universal owns, for the most part, all of the pre-1948 Paramount catalog. Yes, it's a Paramount picture just like Universal's Marx Brothers box were all Paramount pictures originally.

  4. For those who want to sample before you buy, PBS will be broadcasting the Broadway musical version of Holiday Inn on the Friday after Thanksgiving, November 24 at 9:00 PM Eastern 8:00pm Central . Check your local listings as not all PBS stations broadcast shows at the same day and time.

  5. There was a computer colorized version on DVD some years ago.
    I would like to know what people think about the coloriz\tion, or if should also be realesed on blu ray.

  6. Matt Hough

    Universal owns, for the most part, all of the pre-1948 Paramount catalog. Yes, it's a Paramount picture just like Universal's Marx Brothers box were all Paramount pictures originally.

    I thought so. Hopefully Universal can release GOING MY WAY one day.

  7. You could call this a triple dip for me. I got this for the Broadway show disk alone as I already have the previous blu. I also still have the DVD where it was paired with Going My Way, which is the reason I didn't dispose of the DVD.

  8. Wish I could read the review. But, unfortunately, just like the HTF homepage, the review won't load for me. It's been an ongoing issue with this site for me. Probably nobody else, but for the life of me I can't figure out what is causing it. No ad blockers on my computer of any kind.

    Mark

  9. Mark Booth

    Wish I could read the review. But, unfortunately, just like the HTF homepage, the review won't load for me. It's been an ongoing issue with this site for me. Probably nobody else, but for the life of me I can't figure out what is causing it. No ad blockers on my computer of any kind.

    Mark

    This isn't the most artful fix but I think it'll let you read the review:

    The Production: 4/5

    A sure cure for what ails you, Mark Sandrich’s Holiday Inn is one of the classics of Hollywood’s golden age of musicals. Filled to the brim with beautiful songs and featuring two of the most talented and likable leading men in the business at the time, Holiday Inn was a huge hit in its day, turned out a song that became the biggest seller of all time, and continues to enjoy enviable popularity seventy-five years after its initial release. This latest Blu-ray release of the film from Universal recycles the excellent high definition transfer from a previous release and all of the previous bonus material with one new addition that for some will make this inexpensively priced release one to double dip on.

    Tired of the show business grind, crooner Jim Hardy (Bing Crosby) plans to break up his trio act and take his leading lady Lila Dixon (Virginia Dale) to live a quiet life on his newly purchased farm in Connecticut. Unknown to him, however, their dancing partner Ted Hanover (Fred Astaire) has his own plans for Lila, a club act for the two of them and eventually marriage. So, Jim leaves the business but finds farm labor is much more difficult than his show business background has prepared him for, so he gets another great idea: to turn his farm into an inn open only on the holidays with special shows centered on each special occasion. For a new partner, he casts show biz newcomer Linda Mason (Marjorie Reynolds, vocals by Martha Mears) and begins to fall in love with her, but after dancing drunkenly with Linda on New Year’s Eve after Lila dumps him, Ted decides Linda will be his new dance partner and begins plotting to steal her away from Ted’s lucrative Holiday Inn.

    Based on an idea by songwriter Irving Berlin who provided twelve new holiday-based tunes for the movie along with his beloved chestnut “Easter Parade,” the screenplay by Claude Binyon provides a handy romantic and professional show biz tale on which to drape the sensational Irving Berlin songs, almost all of them showing the master at the top of his composing game with lilting melodies that seem amazingly familiar from almost the moment they’re first heard, a quality that Berlin possessed in his songwriting with very few other artists. Each major holiday gets its own song: “Kissing the Old Year Out” for December 31st, “Abraham” for Lincoln’s birthday (a number which included blackface in the minstrel tradition popular at the time), “Be Careful, It’s My Heart” for Valentine’s Day, “I Can’t Tell a Lie” for Washington’s birthday (the weak link of the score), “Say It with Firecrackers” and “Song of Freedom” for the 4th of July, “I’ve Got Plenty to Be Thankful For” for Thanksgiving, and, of course, “White Christmas” which won the Best Song Oscar for 1942 and went on to sell multiple millions of copies of the song on record and in sheet music. “Happy Holidays” and “Come to Holiday Inn” along with “Lazy” and “Easter Parade” also got featured placements. Because most of the numbers take place in the great room of the Holiday Inn, the production numbers are much smaller than in other Hollywood musicals of the era though, of course, Fred Astaire gets two trick numbers “Say It with Firecrackers” and a drunken dance with Marjorie Reynolds that are a bit more expansive, and Bing, Fred, and Virginia Dale get the movie off to a cracking start with “I’ll Capture Her Heart” setting up the personal and professional rivalry that is sustained throughout the movie. Mark Sandrich, who had directed some of Astaire’s most successful RKO musicals with Ginger Rogers, certainly guides the numbers here beautifully with the choppy holiday motif smoothed out wonderfully with his graceful transitions between the various celebrations.

    This was the first teaming of Bing Crosby and Fred Astaire on film, and they proved to be a very enjoyable set of rivals (reunited four years later for another Irving Berlin musical Blue Skies, they basically played the same kinds of guys that they do here). Bing’s voice is at its zenith, and all of the numbers including the iconic “White Christmas” project that mellow richness and impeccable phrasing that was his hallmark. Fred Astaire’s dancing is up to his golden standards, too, with his able partnering of both Virginia Dale and Marjorie Reynolds as well as impressive solo dancing. Gorgeous Marjorie Reynolds may have been dubbed (skillfully; voice double Martha Mears was a superb match for her vocal timbre), but she proves herself to be a most agreeable leading lady, and her dancing with Astaire in “Be Careful, It’s My Heart” is among his greatest ballroom duets. Virginia Dale gets a bit short-changed in both acting and musical performing playing a rather selfish character who capriciously jumps from fella to fella with no seeming guilt, but she’s just fine in that opening number and a later nightclub dance with Astaire. Walter Abel gets several choice moments as Ted’s agitated, easily excitable agent Danny Reed, and Louise Beavers is always a joy to see in movies as inn cook Mamie.

    Video: 5/5
    3D Rating: NA

    The film’s original 1.37:1 theatrical aspect ratio is faithfully delivered in this 1080p transfer using the AVC codec. Being the same transfer as the 2014 Blu-ray release, those familiar with it know it’s impeccably clean and sharp with an impressive grayscale that features excellent black levels and clear, pure whites. Contrast has been consistently applied for a first-rate visual experience. The movie has been divided into 18 chapters.

    Audio: 4/5

    The DTS-HD Master Audio 2.0 mono sound mix offers mostly clear sound with dialogue and lyrics nicely recorded and blended professionally with the Oscar-nominated orchestrations and ambient effects suitable for a film of this period. There is some soft hiss which can be heard in quieter scenes particularly early in the movie, but with so much music, it’s not noticeable for most of the picture.

    Special Features: 5/5

    Holiday Inn in Color (HD): the opening screen allows the viewer to choose either the original black and white or the colorized version of the movie. More natural here than earlier colorization attempts, a more pastel palette has been used through most of the film with bold color ignored for softer hues.

    Audio Commentary: film historian Ken Barnes provides key information on the making of the film and also plays recorded comments from Fred Astaire, Bing Crosby, and others connected to the movie in this track which fans of the movie, if they haven’t heard it on previous DVD and Blu-ray releases, will be sure to want to listen to.

    A Couple of Song and Dance Men (44:35, SD): historian Ken Barnes and Astaire’s daughter Ava Astaire McKenzie offer complementary biographical information on the careers of the two stars showing how their careers paralleled and occasionally crossed during their long decades in show business. Among trailer clips offered in the discussion are moments from King of Jazz, Dream House, The Big Broadcast, Dancing Lady, Top Hat, We’re Not Dressing, Road to Morocco, Blue Skies, Easter Parade, and High Society.

    All-Singing, All-Dancing (7:15, SD): a brief discussion of how film musicals progressed from live stage performances to the use of prerecording vocals but live recording taps.

    Coloring a Classic (8:51, SD): colorizer Barry Sandrew and his staff of professionals explain the process of colorizing Holiday Inn.

    Theatrical Trailer (2:16, SD)

    Irving Berlin’s Holiday Inn: The Broadway Musical (2:02:13, HD; DTS-HD MA 5.1): the 2015 Broadway adaptation of the film produced for BroadwayHD.com starring Bryce Pinkham, Corbin Bleu, Lora Lee Gayer, and Megan Sikora in the four leading roles. The film score has been supplemented by additional Irving Berlin standards from other sources including “Steppin’ Out With My Baby,” “The Little Things in Life,” “Blue Skies,” “Time Marches On,” “Heat Wave,” “It’s a Lovely Day Today,” “Shakin’ the Blues Away,” “Let’s Take an Old-Fashioned Walk,” and “Cheek to Cheek.” A very conventional and entertaining old-style Broadway musical. This is contained on a separate Blu-ray disc in the package.

    Digital Copy: code sheet enclosed in the case.

    Overall: 4.5/5

    Holiday Inn is as good as it ever was with first-rate music and impressive performances from Bing Crosby and Fred Astaire. A genuine classic from Hollywood’s golden age has been brought to high definition with superb picture quality and good lossless sound. The major addition to this release, of course, is the recent Broadway musical version of the show offered on a separate Blu-ray disc in the set. Highly recommended!

  10. BobO’Link

    That's rather easy to do. To have seen it in the last ~30 years or so you pretty much had to have:

    Had parents who were a fan and made a point to tape it off late-night airings and/or purchased the DVD
    or
    Been born before ~1960. After ~1970 it pretty much got relegated to late-night airings (along with many other pre 70s Christmas films).

    Born in 1967 and I came upon "Holiday Inn" on TV in the late 80s or early 90s.

    Midday screening on a local channel! 🙂

  11. BobO’Link

    That's rather easy to do. To have seen it in the last ~30 years or so you pretty much had to have:

    Had parents who were a fan and made a point to tape it off late-night airings and/or purchased the DVD
    or
    Been born before ~1960. After ~1970 it pretty much got relegated to late-night airings (along with many other pre 70s Christmas films).

    Once White Christmas came out, and was pushed hard in the 60s, Holiday Inn pretty much fell by the wayside. White Christmas has most of the songs from Holiday Inn (it was intended as a partial remake of the earlier film) and enough of a plot change to make it feel familiar yet still be new. I still remember the first time I saw White Christmas. I kept wondering where certain songs, that I knew were in the film, were. The farmhouse set is almost identical to that in Holiday Inn and many of the trappings are identical/similar enough that I truly thought I was watching Holiday Inn almost until the end of the film. I first saw White Christmas on a BW TV so there was no color to tip me off. So… if you've seen White Christmas you'll have several deja' vu moments when watching Holiday Inn.

    One warning.

    If you're PC sensitive there's a particular song section dealing with Abraham's Birthday (once a stand alone Holiday, now combined with Washington's and others to make "President's Day") with Crosby in blackface that now comes across as a bit racist. That same song has a section with the maid and her kids singing a particular line with a now verboten word once used to describe blacks (no, not the "N" word), but the term used was not at all uncommon during the slave years, which the song somewhat depicts. I do find that little bit with the maid and her kids somewhat charming (the kids are terribly cute) and am not bothered by the word (it's an archaic term and was when I was growing up, but it's appeared in hundreds of books and films). I've heard complaints about the way the maid talks. I think those are unfounded. I grew up in the South and knew lots of black folks who spoke in just that manner. It's dialect – something every race has, good and bad. The song is rather catchy, but I've never liked the blackface bit (I've never liked any of them and always wondered why they just didn't get black folks for such parts).

    PC stuff aside, this is one of my absolute favorite Christmas/Holiday films.

    Yeah, but you know I try really hard with movies – I'm surprised I hadn't heard of it at the very least. I asked my wife today and she's heard of it. So I just failed at life on this one 🙂

    Coincidentally, my wife and I watched Cover Girl last night because she decided that she hadn't seen enough classic Hollywood musicals from that 1930s-1950s period. "Want to try Holiday Inn next?" was an easy sell.

    So I just ordered Holiday Inn and White Christmas – both blind buys for me.

    Thanks for the PC heads up on Holiday Inn. I try as best I can to watch films in the context they were created in, so I don't think it would have thrown me that much, but now that I know in advance I should be prepared enough that it won't take me out of the film.

  12. I'm glad Howie corrected himself about the similarities of the scores for Holiday Inn and White Christmas because, as he mentioned in his follow-up post, they are VERY different, and the plots really aren't similar either. Yes, Paramount recycled a standing set for the Holiday inn and the Vermont lodge owned by their former general, but the boys aren't vying for the same girl or only working on holidays, and each movie has its own considerable and unique pleasures.

  13. I don't know that "Paramount" considers White Christmas a "loose remake." In fact, in the audio commentary on the disc, Ken Barnes refutes the notion utterly that it is in any way a remake of Holiday Inn.

    I think the song "White Christmas" was all the reminder Paramount needed to spur the public to see the new film.

  14. benbess

    I liked this movie overall, but as mentioned there's one section that makes for uncomfortable viewing today.

    I watched the movie with my wife the other day, first time viewing for both of us, but I had forgotten about the blackface thing so I didn't warn her in advance. I remembered that it was going to happen just before it did, and I guess I was prepared enough that it didn't really distract me, but it totally took my wife out of the film for the time it was on. On one hand, I am glad that the film remained intact on the disc, but on the other hand, I can understand if anyone wanted to skip over that number when watching.

    I wonder what they did for the live musical version – can't imagine they did blackface for a recent Broadway production. Will have to check out that bonus disc one of these days.

  15. Josh Steinberg

    I watched the movie with my wife the other day, first time viewing for both of us, but I had forgotten about the blackface thing so I didn't warn her in advance. I remembered that it was going to happen just before it did, and I guess I was prepared enough that it didn't really distract me, but it totally took my wife out of the film for the time it was on. On one hand, I am glad that the film remained intact on the disc, but on the other hand, I can understand if anyone wanted to skip over that number when watching.

    I wonder what they did for the live musical version – can't imagine they did blackface for a recent Broadway production. Will have to check out that bonus disc one of these days.

    There's a bit of "Abraham" played instrumentally during the stage version, but the number itself is completely gone.

  16. Matt Hough

    There's a bit of "Abraham" played instrumentally during the stage version, but the number itself is completely gone.

    That's about what I expected. I figured maybe they could substitute a different song with some sort of Presidents theme but that even with the visuals removed, keeping the song itself would still be difficult.

    Honestly, even more than the blackface in the musical number, the part I found more jarring was the scene that follows, where Bing Crosby is almost whining that he can't wear blackface again in the next holiday number. The reason he's pushing for blackface has to do with hoping that Fred Astaire won't notice that his partner is the Astaire has been trying to find, so it's not really that Crosby just has an insatiable desire to wear as much blackface as possible as often as possible. Still, to hear a grown adult whining about wanting to wear blackface, that pulled me out of the film for a moment. I understand both the reasoning for him wanting to wear it, as well as the context that it was considered acceptable and a normal way of performing at the time, and intellectually I can put it in that context, but seeing it for the first time just felt a little awkward to watch. Maybe part of it is that while I accept that blackface is part of the past, it never occurred to me that people would want to do it (as opposed to, "that's just how we did things then and no one thought about it").

  17. Josh Steinberg

    I wonder what they did for the live musical version – can't imagine they did blackface for a recent Broadway production. Will have to check out that bonus disc one of these days.

    I didn't think the stage production offered an especially faithful reproduction of the movie – it loses "Abraham", of course, and it also axes/changes plenty of other parts of the film…

  18. Another wonderful Stanwyck film with a Christmas theme(and one of my favorite movies of all time) is Mitchell Leisen's "Remember the Night" (1940) — If you've never seen it, please do yourself a favor and watch it. Beautiful work from all involved!!

  19. White Christmas is my favourite holiday film, and always preferred to Holiday Inn (although also a really good film). Two others I always watch at this time of year are It Happened on Fifth Avenue and Cover Up (1949).

  20. BobO’Link

    That, too, is an old favorite of mine. It costars Fred MacMurray, a favorite actor. I was fortunate enough to get a pressed copy when I picked up a copy from TCM. It's one of those MODs that got pressed for initial release (like Warner Archives does with "high demand" type titles).

    Remember the Night is so good I purchased it thrice! Two DVD's and then the Blu-ray. A great film, and Mitchell Leisen is an underrated Director.

    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
    Original Release (2009)………………………LoC Remaster………………Blu-ray

  21. BobO’Link

    Oh wow! I didn't know there was a BR release!

    EDIT..

    I looked up that BR release. It's OOP and commanding very high prices!

    I just don't understand titles like that going OOP…

    It's a very good Blu-ray disc from an excellent transfer. I've read that Universal did some remedial work on the elements.
    I advise you to keep searching for one going for a sensible price.

  22. Josh Steinberg

    I watched the movie with my wife the other day, first time viewing for both of us, but I had forgotten about the blackface thing so I didn't warn her in advance. I remembered that it was going to happen just before it did, and I guess I was prepared enough that it didn't really distract me, but it totally took my wife out of the film for the time it was on. On one hand, I am glad that the film remained intact on the disc, but on the other hand, I can understand if anyone wanted to skip over that number when watching.

    I wonder what they did for the live musical version – can't imagine they did blackface for a recent Broadway production. Will have to check out that bonus disc one of these days.

    I recall watching this a few years ago and my wife, who had never seen it before (neither had I) happened to walk in the living room during that scene. It made her resemble that jaw-dropping emoticon.

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