Heat: Director’s Definitive Edition Blu-ray Review

Magnificently complex crime picture has few equals. 4.5 Stars

Michael Mann’s Heat may concern cops and robbers, but its richness in character exploration and the vividness of its action sequences take it far into another realm of action picture.

Heat (1995)
Released: 15 Dec 1995
Rated: R
Runtime: 170 min
Director: Michael Mann
Genre: Action, Crime, Drama
Cast: Al Pacino, Robert De Niro, Val Kilmer, Jon Voight
Writer(s): Michael Mann
Plot: A group of professional bank robbers start to feel the heat from police when they unknowingly leave a clue at their latest heist.
IMDB rating: 8.2
MetaScore: 76

Disc Information
Studio: Fox
Distributed By: N/A
Video Resolution: 1080P/AVC
Aspect Ratio: 2.40:1
Audio: English 5.1 DTS-HDMA, French 5.1 DTS, Other
Subtitles: English SDH, Spanish, French, Other
Rating: R
Run Time: 2 Hr. 50 Min.
Package Includes: Blu-ray, Digital Copy
Case Type: keep case in a slipcover
Disc Type: BD50 (dual layer)
Region: A
Release Date: 05/09/2017
MSRP: $16.99

The Production: 4.5/5

Michael Mann’s Heat may concern cops and robbers, but its richness in character exploration and the vividness of its action sequences take it far into another realm of action picture. The director’s definitive edition released in this new edition won’t likely reveal any nuances that longtime fans haven’t already ferreted out, but the movie is so richly complex that each new visit to its personal and professional glimpses into the lives of two dedicated teams of men: one upholding the law and one disregarding it always reveals fresh insights and inspirations to the casual viewer. This is, in short, its director’s greatest achievement.

A well-funded and highly professional heist crew headed by mastermind Neil McCauley (Robert De Niro) has three big payday jobs on its docket: the theft of $1.6 million in bearer bonds, a lucrative platinum burglary, and the extraction of $12.1 million from a bank. The crew gets away clean from the first job though a new addition to the team Waingro (Kevin Gage) gets trigger happy and kills the three guards and is summarily ejected from the squad. But this misfire is enough to spur an intense investigation by ace LAPA homicide detective Vincent Hanna (Al Pacino), a cagey police veteran who has brought down some of the toughest and most organized gangs in the country. It’s at the second job where McCauley, at this point under surveillance by Hanna and his men, figures out something is amiss and thus aborts the mission, the police letting him and his top lieutenant Chris Shiherlis (Val Kilmer) escape due to a lack of evidence that could put them away for life. Though McCauley thinks they should pull up stakes and leave Los Angeles (he’s met a woman (Amy Brenneman) he feels he could build a life with) especially after he has a face-to-face meeting with Hanna who lets him know he’s under close scrutiny, he leaves it up to the team whether they should pull off their third job. The decision is made to go for it, and now the stakes for everyone are riding extremely high and the slightest slip-up could mean the difference between life and death.

Writer-producer-director Michael Mann has treated all of his characters as protagonists in his amazingly written and cagily structured screenplay. We basically go back-and-forth between the cops and the robbers peering into their professional worlds while at the same time seeing the upsides and (mostly) downsides of the lives they have chosen to live with loved ones who, on both sides of the law, are burdened by the choices being made for the work subsequently affecting unstable family life. Mann’s direction of the three heists is exemplary and a perfect example of where he has placed narrative before his visual style for a change: the first one going off with great precision, the second aborted right before the score is made, and the third ending in one of the most kinetically explosive street-level gun battles in movie history. From that point on, the film only gains in suspense as the heist survivors try to get out of town while holding on to pieces of their existences they want to retain while at the same time feeling the need to settle the score with squealers and screw-ups. The police side of the story is also well captured with long hours of surveillance, split-second decisions having to be made about arrests, and the efforts to defend themselves while keeping terrified onlookers safe from the sprays of bullets coming from the mobsters who don’t care whom they hit. There are a couple of missteps along the way: a subplot involving Hanna’s stepdaughter Lauren (Natalie Portman), distraught over the indifference of her real-life father, seems an unnecessary complexity to his personal story which is already fraught with explosive derision with his dissatisfied wife Justine (Diane Venora), and the climactic chase of McCauley by Hanna across LAX into adjoining fields and outbuildings is more rudimentary than it should have been with two minds as keen as these two enemies behaving in less than intelligent fashion.

Al Pacino receives top billing and offers the more bombastic and showy of the two leading performances. (Pacino later revealed there were cut scenes that showed his character was a cocaine user which would account for his sometimes overly manic behavior.) Robert De Niro is restrained and almost admirable as the brilliant crook who lives strictly by a solitary code that works for him, until it doesn’t and he falls victim to solving his loneliness by involving himself intimately with someone else. The two legendary actors’ first scene together coming some ninety minutes into the movie is the kind of thing students of acting can study for years for the nuances of give and take that the two actors provide. Val Kilmer is unpredictably fun to watch as the feisty Chris while Tom Sizemore as the more settled and cool-headed Mike Cheritto offers an outstanding performance. Jon Voight plays the enigmatic fixer Nate with his fingers in lots of pies while Dennis Haysbert is fine (but underused) as a late-joining member of the crew replacing the psychopath played engagingly by Kevin Gage. On the law-abiding side of the equation, Hanna’s team is wonderfully acted by Wes Studi, Ted Levine, and Mykelti Williamson. Others operating on the illegal fringes of the story (while still vitally important to its unspooling) are William Fichtner and Hank Azaria. As the women in the lives of these men, Diane Venora, Amy Brenneman, and Ashley Judd all have moments to shine and do much with their limited screen time. The very young Natalie Portman also does superbly with her few scenes as the disturbed Lauren.

Video: 5/5

3D Rating: NA

This new restoration supervised by the director and overseen by Fox’s Shawn Belston is a honey, the theatrical aspect ratio of 2.40:1 being faithfully delivered in 1080p resolution using the AVC codec. There isn’t an age-related spot or speck to be seen, and sharpness is consistently excellent except in scenes which have always featured softer cinematography. Black levels are wonderfully rich and deep, and shadow detail is very pleasing. Color throughout is controlled and very realistic with very believable skin tones. The movie has been divided into 52 chapters.

Audio: 5/5

The DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1 sound mix is as enveloping and kinetic as it ever has been with thundering bass where appropriate (all the scenes at LAX feature takeoffs and landings panning across and through the soundstage), and the most creative sound design offering split atmospheric effects throughout that put the viewer into the center of the action. Dialogue has been superbly recorded and has been placed in the center channel. The music by Elliot Goldenthal and songs by Moby get excellent spread through the fronts and rears.

Special Features: 5/5

The feature film Blu-ray contains the familiar audio commentary by producer Michael Mann, pretty much explaining action on the screen and offering psychological explanations for the choices the characters are making.

All of the other bonus material is contained on a separate Blu-ray disc. It contains:

Academy Panel Discussion (1:03:23, HD): director Christopher Nolan first introduces writer-director Michael Mann and stars Al Pacino and Robert De Niro who answer his questions for about half an hour. Then additional members of the production company including actors Val Kilmer, Mykelti Williamson, and Diane Verona, editor Dov Hoenig, and producer Art Linson come onto the stage and also take part in the questions and answers.

TIFF Q&A (30:27, HD): at the Toronto International Film Festival, Heat is screened for a packed audience, and writer-director Michael Mann offers an eight minute introduction and then about twenty-two minutes of questions and answers afterwards.

The Making of Heat (59:12, SD): a three-part documentary on the writing, casting, and production of the movie with comments from writer-director Michael Mann, Chicago police detective Chuck Adamson who gave Mann the inspiration from his true life experiences, historian Richard Lindberg, Mann friend Dennis Farina, technical advisor Tom Elfont, first assistant director Michael Wasman, second assistant director Ami Mann, director of photography Dante Spinotti, producers Art Linson and Pieter Jan Brugge, production designer Neil Spisak, composers Elliot Goldenthal and Moby, sound mixer Chris Jenkins, and actors Diane Venora, Amy Brenneman, Ashley Judd, Mykelti Williamson, Dennis Haysbert, Tom Noonan, Robert De Niro, Jon Voight, Al Pacino, Val Kilmer, and Tom Sizemore.

Pacino and De Niro: The Conversation (9:58, SD): the faceoff between the two legendary actors is commented on by director Michael Mann, producer Pieter Jan Brugge, cinematographer Dante Spinotti (who explains how it was shot), and actors Al Pacino, Robert De Niro, Jon Voight, Ashley Judd, and Tom Sizemore.

Return to the Scene of the Crime (12:05, SD): location manager Janice Polley takes us back to many of the locations in Los Angeles used for filming memorable scenes in the movie.

Deleted Scenes (9:44, SD): eleven scenes may be watched individually or in montage.

Theatrical Trailers (6:48, SD): three trailers may be watched together or separately.

Digital Copy: code sheet enclosed in the case.

Overall: 5/5

One of the greatest crime pictures of the last quarter century, Michael Mann’s Heat looks incredibly beautiful and sounds notably amazing in this new restoration offered on Blu-ray. Highly recommended!

Published by

Matt Hough

author,editor

62 Comments

  1. Dave Moritz

    I was lucky enough to see the private screening of Heat (Directors Definitive Edition) this past week in Westwood Village with Michael Man. It was great being able to see the awesome movie on the big screen again.

    I remember seeing the movie in the theater when it was first released and the sound was so loud that my ears were ringing the next day like I had been at a concert.

  2. I pity anyone, that have to sit through a teal & orange fake darkness mess like this new version. 😮 You couldn't pay me to do it.

    This movie has been restored and remastered and will be in stores soon. And what I saw at the theater looked great so not sure what your talking about unless there was an issue with the previous blu-ray release.

  3. Dave Moritz

    This movie has been restored and remastered and will be in stores soon. And what I saw at the theater looked great so not sure what your talking about unless there was an issue with the previous blu-ray release.

    Dave,

    Did he answer any questions about a 4K release?

  4. Even the old comparison review on dvdbeaver show quite a big difference, from a rather normal looking picture to the current and industry hip trend of teal/orange post-production craziness. I expect this new release to be similar or probably worse, at least according to some views I've heard.

  5. Dave,

    Did he answer any questions about a 4K release?

    This was something I was interested in finding out as well. In the Q&A there was someone sitting next to Michael Mann asking him a bunch of questions. I assume these where questions that where pre approved and discussed prior to the event. The Q&A was held after the movie and after those questions where asked the opened it up to a limited number of questions as it seemed that Michael wanted to be done by a certain time or that the venue wanted to be closed down by a certain time. But to answer your question that question was not asked and I did not have the opportunity to ask if it was going to get a 4K UHD BD release. One guy that was chosen to ask a question did not actually ask a question as he felt it was ok to actually pitch a idea to Michael Mann which actually annoyed many in the audience. I wish I could have asked that question or at least someone that was chosen would have asked that question.

    Heat is listed on bluray.com as a upcoming 4K UHD BD release even though there is no actual release date posted so I hope that this title will hopefully come out before Christmas this year.

    http://www.blu-ray.com/movies/Heat-4K-Blu-ray/162890/

  6. HenryDuBrow

    Even the old comparison review on dvdbeaver show quite a big difference, from a rather normal looking picture to the current and industry hip trend of teal/orange post-production craziness. I expect this new release to be similar or probably worse, at least according to some views I've heard.

    You're aware this disc is a totally new transfer, correct? Until you have some actual evidence on what the new transfer looks like, perhaps listen to the people in this very thread that have actually seen it first.

  7. Am not trying to play devil's advocate or anything, but there really are some justified concerns about the way this latest remaster has turned out. The new BD has been available for over two months in the UK and the US's will likely be identical in every way. There's a similarly glowing review of it here and a mammoth thread on it here. I've somehow managed to never see Heat yet and wanted to find out which version to buy, so have read the whole lot. Basically, there are gains and losses over the old release. Gains seem to be largely a matter of opinion, but losses definitely include significant cropping on all four edges and much, but not all, of the film receiving the dreaded teal treatment. Just check out captures 8, 9, 11, 12 and 13 over at Caps-a-holic.

    As I said, I had no prior experience of this film and when I started reading up on it I thought buying the latest BD would be a no-brainer. However, after digesting the above and various other threads and reviews, I've opted to go for the original release.

  8. Brent Reid

    Am not trying to play devil's advocate or anything, but there really are some justified concerns about the way this latest remaster has turned out. The new BD has been available for over two months in the UK and the US's will likely be identical in every way. There's a similarly glowing review of it here and a mammoth thread on it here. I've somehow managed to never see Heat yet and wanted to find out which version to buy, so have read the whole lot. Basically, there are gains and losses over the old release. Gains seem to be largely a matter of opinion, but losses definitely include significant cropping on all four edges and much, but not all, of the film receiving the dreaded teal treatment. Just check out captures 8, 9, 11, 12 and 13 over at Caps-a-holic.

    As I said, I had no prior experience of this film and when I started reading up on it I thought buying the latest BD would be a no-brainer. However, after digesting the above and various other threads and reviews, I've opted to go for the original release.

    The cropping is minimal and isn't a factor when watching the film. The sound re-encode is significantly better on the new release.

  9. I am keeping my current BD even if this new one blows me away on Tuesday. Why? Because I have seen my old BD so many times that is has imprinted in my mind as *the way the movie is.*

    Expectations high but withholding judgment until I see it Tuesday.

  10. I got it for $7.88 from Amazon, it should arrive tomorrow or Wednesday. I figure, worst case, I’m out $8 if the transfer really is bad. Best case, I just got an awesome remaster of a film I love for under $10. Worth the gamble.

  11. From the Digital Bits, for what it's worth:

    "20th Century Fox’s new 1080p/2.39:1 aspect ratio Blu-ray presentation, mastered from a brand new 4K scan and restoration supervised by Mann, improves upon Warner’s 2009 Blu-ray image in virtually every way…"

  12. I received it yesterday (my 4th purchase of this movie, going back to LD) and watched it today. For roughly $8, I don't know what all the hemming and hawing is for. It looks and sounds great. 'nuff said.

  13. I never said it didn't look great. I said it it didn't appear to be made from a 4K source as had been reported.

    I have the BD remaster of GLORY from a 4K source and that popped my eyeballs. I'm wondering if this release of HEAT was even remastered.

    It's my own fault for double dipping before the reviews were out. But generally I can trust the Digital Bits. Live and learn.

  14. Carabimero

    I never said it didn't look great. I said it it didn't appear to be made from a 4K source as had been reported.

    I have the BD remaster of GLORY from a 4K source and that popped my eyeballs. I'm wondering if this release of HEAT was even remastered.

    It's my own fault for double dipping before the reviews were out. But generally I can trust the Digital Bits. Live and learn.

    I seriously doubt Fox would issue misinformation about this release and then have Michael Mann at a Q & A promoting this video release.

  15. Robert Crawford

    I seriously doubt Fox would issue misinformation about this release and then have Michael Mann at a Q & A promoting this video release.

    I never said Fox released misinformation.

    After seeing the quality of the transfer, I am simply questioning whether the info from the Digital Bits is accurate. Can someone provide a secondary source confirming this BD transfer stemmed from 4K? I saw nothing on the box (or on the screen) confirming the info from The Digital Bits.

  16. Carabimero

    I never said Fox released misinformation.

    After seeing the quality of the transfer, I am simply questioning whether the info from the Digital Bits is accurate. Can someone provide a secondary source confirming this BD transfer stemmed from 4K? I saw nothing on the box (or on the screen) confirming the info from The Digital Bits.

    The following post from Ron Epstein states a new restoration overseen by Michael Mann. I have a hard time believing that it wasn't done in 4K. So you can choose to believe what you want and I'll do the same.

    https://www.hometheaterforum.com/community/posts/4473589/

  17. Got mine yesterday. I was upgrading from DVD, so it was an easy choice.

    I am a little afraid for the future of physical media when something as special as a director-approved restoration of a classic film with an hour of new extras is sold for less than $8.

  18. Robert Crawford

    I have a hard time believing that it wasn't done in 4K. So you can choose to believe what you want and I'll do the same.

    Nobody I talked to can confirm this was sourced from 4K. Nothing I can find in post 26 or on the box says it's from 4K. Even if I wanted to make a leap in logic and believe it was, it simply doesn't look like a 4K source.

    My beef was information from another reputable source stating that it was mastered from 4K and ordering it based on that info. As I stated in an earlier post, it's a mistake I shan't make again.

    Sam Favate

    I am a little afraid for the future of physical media when something as special as a director-approved restoration of a classic film with an hour of new extras is sold for less than $8.

    The price point is another strong indicator that a 4K source on this is dubious. The price alone should have been enough to tell me the score. I should have listened to my little voice….

  19. Carabimero

    Nobody I talked to can confirm this was sourced from 4K. Nothing I can find in post 26 or on the box says it's from 4K. Even if I wanted to make a leap in logic and believe it was, it simply doesn't look like a 4K source.

    It is interesting that the announcement that Ron posted does not mention that it was scanned at 4K but all over the internet in articles where it is discussed they all mention a new 4K scan. Obviously it is a new scan, that much seems certain and if they did a new scan why would they not have done it at 4K. I have the disc but have not yet watched it. Many reviews I have seen say detail improves on this new disc but perhaps not to a degree that convinces people it is 4K. Also I believe I have seen people mentioning that this new image is "darker" and perhaps this has something to do with how people feel about how it looks. I would assume contacting 20th Century Fox could get an answer. I am sure the people involved with the disc know the particulars of what was done.

    You will find this repeated in several places around the internet:

    The release will be sourced from a NEW 4K REMASTER of the film, supervised by director Michael Mann.

    I would guess that Fox put that out there and it was not invented by the people repeating it…you would hope anyway.

  20. The strongest indicator to me that is is not 4K (besides my subjective eyes) is that there is nothing on the box (that I could find) to indicate it. It's a major selling point and I expect to see it at the top of the box.

  21. Carabimero

    The strongest indicator to me that is is not 4K (besides my subjective eyes) is that there is nothing on the box (that I could find) to indicate.

    Like I stated believe as you wish and I'll do the same until proof is provided to prove otherwise.

  22. Robert Crawford

    More like your opinion, but okay have it your way.

    It's an opinion I can back up with more than just a single assumption (nothing on the official box says it is, it doesn't look like it is to many who own it, and the price doesn't support it).

  23. JohnRice

    I received it yesterday (my 4th purchase of this movie, going back to LD) and watched it today. For roughly $8, I don't know what all the hemming and hawing is for. It looks and sounds great. 'nuff said.

    Yeah, I mean do we watch the slip cover for 2 hours, the IMDB data base for specs for 2 hours, or do we just watch the damn movie?

  24. For what it's worth, there are plenty of discs sourced from 4K remastered that don't highlight this on the box. Of the major studios, Sony is really the most active in pursuing that verbiage.

    I also don't think disc cost has anything to do with anything. Discs are an afterthought now. They no longer sell enough copies to be the sole funding of a major studio restoration. Universal's gorgeous new Spartacus restoration is under $10. All this says to me is that Fox is going for volume. The previous Heat disc has been about $6-8 for years. I'm sure the studio is aware of how many copies it has sold and at what price point and made the calculation that they'd make more selling more copies for a smaller fee than fewer copies for a higher fee.

  25. Wow. All this is kind of freaky. I've been an HT and audio enthusiast for a long, long time… because I love movies and music. If you're drawn here out of a love of movies and you're a fan of this one in particular, You should be quite pleased with this release.

  26. JohnRice

    Wow. All this is kind of freaky. I've been an HT and audio enthusiast for a long, long time… because I love movies and music. If you're drawn here out of a love of movies and you're a fan of this one in particular, you should be quite pleased with this release.

    if I already hadn't bought the earlier release, I'd probably be over the moon. But I was specifically led to believe this was from a 4K source, "superior in every way" to the release I already paid money for. Compared side by side, as someone who has been paid to do this kind of thing, it just isn't, in my opinion. It's not the clarity as much as the expanded dynamic range, which to my eyes simply isn't there.

    We'll see if a BD with a 4K source is announced in the future. Of course, studios would never stoop to that kind of triple dipping, so what must I be thinking….?

  27. Well, I haven't ordered it yet, but Carabinero's opinion so far, is the only one I've seen that says the new transfer isn't an "improvement in every way".soooooooo, I'm going for it, even though it will be my 3rd purchase (DVD, BLURAY)

  28. I got a response from Fox to my email asking if the transfer was sourced from 4K: "The transfer is all new."

    I replied: "What I specifically want to know is if the transfer on the new BD was mastered from a 4K source. May I have a yes or no response, please?"

  29. Sam Favate

    I am a little afraid for the future of physical media when something as special as a director-approved restoration of a classic film with an hour of new extras is sold for less than $8.

    Josh Steinberg

    I also don't think disc cost has anything to do with anything. Discs are an afterthought now. They no longer sell enough copies to be the sole funding of a major studio restoration. Universal's gorgeous new Spartacus restoration is under $10. All this says to me is that Fox is going for volume. The previous Heat disc has been about $6-8 for years. I'm sure the studio is aware of how many copies it has sold and at what price point and made the calculation that they'd make more selling more copies for a smaller fee than fewer copies for a higher fee.

    It's $16.99 at Amazon now, and it's currently Amazon's #9 best-selling Blu-ray, so it looks like somebody knew what they were doing.

  30. Richard Gallagher

    It's $16.99 at Amazon now, and it's currently Amazon's #9 best-selling Blu-ray, so it looks like somebody knew what they were doing.

    Wow…I preordered it fir $7.88!

  31. Carabimero

    If I hadn't bought the earlier release, I'd probably be over the moon. But I was specifically led to believe this was from a 4K source, "superior in every way" to the release I already paid money for. Compared side by side, it just isn't, in my opinion. It's not the clarity as much as the expanded dynamic range, which to my eyes simply isn't there.

    And really, whether I am right or wrong, if it was a great transfer, worthy of a double BD dip, wouldn't some of us be "oohing" and "ahhing"? I like to think I would. I still "ooh" and "ahh" over my BD of GLORY sourced from 4K. The transfer's expanded dynamic range leaves no doubt from the first shot.

    Whereas from the first shot of HEAT all I had was doubt. And watching the rest of the movie didn't alleviate my doubt but only deepened it.

    The problem is the encoding of the disc is poor and a lot of detail is being lost as a result on the new BD. The encoding process is just as important as the transfer itself when it comes to the final product. You can take a perfect 4K transfer and ruin it on the disc (as we've seen before). The older release had better encoding actually. The film grain should have a consistent, velvety texture and it doesn't. There's a swarmy, digital look and it's not well resolved. Good encoding and compression goes a long way.

    Once this is released on UHD BD and done in H.265 I think there will be a marked improvement (unless they drop the ball again). However, H.265 gives more leeway for goofups.

  32. Dave H

    (unless they drop the ball again).

    Yes, the older release is definitely better (I put the old release in the new box and the new release in the old box and gave it to a friend). Thanks for confirming that I hadn't lost my mind (and my eyesight).

    Even so, I would expect telltale signs of improved dynamic range to be present in this new release if it was 4K, even if encoding was botched.

    Either way, what a colossal disappointment.

  33. I watched Heat on HBO about 20 years ago. My recollection is that I thought it was a two hour story crammed into a three hour run time. Does the DE lengthen or tighten the film?

  34. Carabimero

    Yes, the older release is definitely better. Thanks for confirming that I hadn't lost my mind (and my eyesight).

    Even so, I would expect some of the telltale signs of improved dynamic range to be present in this new release if it was 4K, even if encoding is botched.

    Yes, the range does seem more limited. It almost looks like the gamma has been raised giving way to blacks that are not quite as deep. The color for better or worse is warmer too where as the Warner disc had a more cool tone.

    From reading that Mann interview, he at least admits to making changes to his movies over time. At least the Warner disc is available still.

  35. Dave H

    Yes, the range does seem more limited. It almost looks like the gamma has been raised giving way to blacks that are not quite as deep. The color for better or worse is warmer too where as the Warner disc had a more cool tone.

    I agree. And you are almost certainly right.

    But I remain curious. While I have no doubt Mann supervised a 4K master, is there an official press release from FOX stating the source from which the BD was mastered was 4K? In the official statements I saw, 4K was never mentioned. It's only mentioned, as far as I have been able to determine, by outsiders writing articles.

    Certainly it's mentioned in an official release somewhere…?

  36. DaveF

    I watched Heat on HBO about 20 years ago. My recollection is that I thought it was a two hour story crammed into a three hour run time. Does the DE lengthen or tighten the film?

    It's a new scan of the theatrical version, overseen by Michael Mann. No content changes have been done, apart from the deletion of one line in a scene between Hanna and his wife at dinner, which was the most awkward use of the word detritus in cinema history.

  37. Forgot how good this movie was since its been over a decade prob since I've seen it, and that was DVD. You don't see a lot of movies like this right now, especially at 170 mins keeping you entertained.

    When they are running across the runway and the plane is taxiing by, my freaking chairs shook. Bank shootout was pretty good, some of the gunshots were a little harsh and lacked punch at other times.

  38. Robert Crawford

    Amazon now selling this terrific disc for $6.99!

    As said above, I fear for the future of physical media when something as special as a director-approved restoration of a classic film with an hour of new extras is sold for less than $8. And now less than $7!

  39. titch

    The cropping is minimal and isn't a factor when watching the film. The sound re-encode is significantly better on the new release.

    Re your first sentence: are you sure you're in the right forum? 😉 Besides which, it's hardly minimal. If this remaster showed more image info, it would be praised as an improvement. Less, and it's simply overlooked. As for your second point, please define "better".

    Richard Gallagher

    My eyes glaze over when I read criticism of a Blu-ray from someone who hasn't seen it. Just sayin'.

    I didn't criticise the new release; I simply pointed out some valid concerns, as noted by many who had seen it. Further, I provided links that irrefutably prove said concerns.

    Here's what we know about this release: it's been tealed, cropped and has no more resolution than the old one. Not my opinion, but fact. That's fine, but very disappointing for a hotly anticipated, supposedly 4K remaster. Any improvements seem to be incremental at best. Overall, it seems the only real reason to buy the latest BD is for the two new Q&A extras.

  40. Thief has probably the most egregious example of revisionist tealing I've seen yet. Check out the theatrical vs (tealed) director's cut on the UK Arrow and German OFDb Filmworks BDs. There are no whites left in sight; each capture is worse than the last. If this is really Maan's doing, what the hell is he thinking? Absolutely appalling.

  41. Brent Reid

    I didn't criticise the new release; I simply pointed out some valid concerns, as noted by many who had seen it. Further, I provided links that irrefutably prove said concerns.

    I was referring to the comments by Henry DuBrow.

  42. Richard Gallagher

    I was referring to the comments by Henry DuBrow.

    Ah, my sincere apologies, Rich. When I next checked in after posting, yours was one of two comments in quick succession, the other one of which (since deleted by mods), definitely was a rude, unwarranted personal attack. I inadvertently lumped the two together; typical confusion arising from the limitations of text-based communication!

    Getting back OT, I find it telling that this thread isn't exactly rife with folk raving about the new transfer, and what a massive upgrade it is from the old one. It's the sort of talk that usually follows a redone re-release of a much-loved catalogue title…

    On the other hand, I've since received a copy of the original BD (£2.48 delivered from Amazon UK – bargain!) and enjoyed it thoroughly. What a great film! :thumbs-up-smiley:

  43. I will be piking this up for the price you can't go wrong and if the audio is better than the earlier BR I will get it just for that. If and when the UHD comes out I'm only out $8.

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