HDR10+ Technology Now ‘Widely Available’

HDR10+ Technologies, LLC, is a development consortium founded by 20th Century Fox, Panasonic and Samsung. At the end of last week, it announced the start of the new licensing and logo certification program for HDR10+ technology. HDR10+ is the royalty-free, open standard dynamic metadata platform for High Dynamic Range (HDR), which optimizes picture quality for 4K Ultra HD displays and should improve the viewing experience for all audiences.

As many of you may already be aware, the new HDR10+ technology optimizes picture quality for 4K Ultra HD displays by using dynamic tone mapping to reflect frame to frame or scene to scene variations in brightness, color saturation, and contrast. The resulting enhanced viewing experience will now be provided on a wide range of displays bringing the viewing experience much closer to the original creative intent for the content. HDR10+, as opposed to HDR10 with its one-size-fits-all approach, includes this metadata which is carried along with movie or content files, and provides for scene-by-scene adjustments for optimum presentation. Dolby Vision also includes signals with metadata.

According to HDR10+ Technologies, its license and logo certification is now available to interested companies that meet HDR10+ technical and testing specifications. The HDR10+ certification program qualifies the compliance based on different device categories and their technical performance to ensure that HDR10+ compliant products meet high standards for picture quality.

At the moment there are over 40 companies supporting the technology through content production, distribution and consumption, and consumers will be able to look out for the certification of hardware and software products with the HDR10+ logo

“The new HDR10+ licensing and certification program represents a technological step forward for next generation displays,” said Danny Kaye, Executive Vice President of 20th Century Fox and Managing Director of the Fox Innovation Lab. “HDR10+ improves the viewing experience for all audiences by delivering higher picture quality to a wider range of affordable TVs and devices.”

“We believe that this licensing and certification program will provide reassurance to consumers who want to ensure that they are seeing the most accurate HDR representation of the creator’s vision,” said Toshiharu Tsutsui, Director of Panasonic’s TV Business Division.

“With an increase in demand for larger displays and premium picture quality, we are thrilled to announce a new HDR10+ licensing and certification program,” said Bill Mandel, Vice President of Industry Relations at Samsung Research America. “This program was designed with consumers in mind, highlighting our commitment to improving the overall HDR experience while simultaneously extending the HDR10+ ecosystem globally.”

The HDR10+ platform will also give way to future development and enhancements as technologies evolve. If you’re interested in to find out more, go to www.hdr10plus.org.

 

Published by

Martin Dew

editor

23 Comments

  1. There are already too many HDR formats, causing mass confusion and annoyance. The only HDR format that riolled out with the least amount of hiccups was plain old HDR10, which is open source and supported by nearly every UHD display, streaming device, and disc player currently on the market. With Technicolor's HDR format about to launch, too, that will take us to FOUR different formats.

    After the success of single-format DVD and the waged format wars of Beta vs VHS and Blu-ray vs. HD-DVD, has the industry learned anything?

  2. Sam Posten

    I have 3 different modern 4K TVs. None of them support the format, no disks do, Netflix and Vudu don't. Good luck with that.

    Sam, has your Sony display been updated with real DolbyVision yet? I remember Vizio's had an issue where they supported nothing but DolbyVision, and no HDR10 support for months until a firmware update fixed that.

  3. gadgtfreek

    Meh. Im over it.

    Same here. I do not plan on replacing my 4K display for many years as long as it functions, so this is irrelevant at the moment for me. My display supports Dolby Vision, but I have been in no hurry to upgrade my UHD player to one with DV support, so why should I care about HDR10+? The only Dolby Vision material I've seen has been a few films via streaming.

  4. Scott Merryfield

    Same here. I do not plan on replacing my 4K display for many years as long as it functions, so this is irrelevant at the moment for me. My display supports Dolby Vision, but I have been in no hurry to upgrade my UHD player to one with DV support, so why should I care about HDR10+? The only Dolby Vision material I've seen has been a few films via streaming.

    The numbers are increasing though. As to HDR10+, I'm not in a hurry to replace any of my current displays as that means I won't have 3-D any longer at that HT setup once I do that. I've have only one 4K display as of now.

  5. Robert Crawford

    The numbers are increasing though. As to HDR10+, I'm not in a hurry to replace any of my current displays as that means I won't have 3-D any longer at that HT setup once I do that. I've have only one 4K display as of now.

    Yes, some of the more recent UHD discs I have purchased include Dolby Vision encoding. I'm just not rushing out to upgrade my Sony X800 to a DV-capable model, though, as the options are rather limited at the moment. Oppo is gone, and the DV models from Sony and LG are really a step down from my Sony X800 except for the DV feature. The forthcoming models from Panasonic and Pioneer may entice me later this year. In the meantime, HDR10 looks fine to me.

  6. Todd Erwin

    There are already too many HDR formats, causing mass confusion and annoyance. The only HDR format that rolled out with the least amount of hiccups was plain old HDR10, which is open source and supported by nearly every UHD display, streaming device, and disc player currently on the market. With Technicolor's HDR format about to launch, too, that will take us to FOUR different formats.

    After the success of single-format DVD and the waged format wars of Beta vs VHS and Blu-ray vs. HD-DVD, has the industry learned anything?

    This isn’t VHS vs Beta or Blu vs Red, this is Dolby vs DTS. Have people been complaining for 20 years about the dueling audio formats tearing apart the home theater industry?

    And it seems like a royalty free HDR10+ could eventually have more success than partially supported and seemingly hot mess of Dolby Vision.

  7. Scott Merryfield

    Same here. I do not plan on replacing my 4K display for many years as long as it functions, so this is irrelevant at the moment for me. My display supports Dolby Vision, but I have been in no hurry to upgrade my UHD player to one with DV support, so why should I care about HDR10+? The only Dolby Vision material I've seen has been a few films via streaming.

    I actually backed away from DV. Too much control over your devices, and they arent even using it at potential. Add on that only certain houses will uses it because of fees, and slow certification of devices = overhyped.

    I always laugh when people ask "why is X blacked out when in DV mode" and the answer is because Dolby doesnt think you should be able to select that. Screw Dolby, I paid for the stuff. So my new purchasing rules are if it has DV on board, it better have a way for me to cut DV off if I decide I do not want to use that version.

    Now Dolby is moving into control certain feautres of your sound on '18 and '19 AVR's…

  8. Todd Erwin

    Sam, has your Sony display been updated with real DolbyVision yet? I remember Vizio's had an issue where they supported nothing but DolbyVision, and no HDR10 support for months until a firmware update fixed that.

    No but I bought a deck that supports Sony's implementation and now the Oppos do too.

  9. Robert_Zohn

    Warner Bros, pulled out of the HDR10+ consortium and dropped support for HDR10+, leaving Fox as the lone Hollywood studio supporting HDR10+.

    Who knows how long that will last if they're finally sold to Disney.

  10. DaveF

    This isn’t VHS vs Beta or Blu vs Red, this is Dolby vs DTS. Have people been complaining for 20 years about the dueling audio formats tearing apart the home theater industry?

    And it seems like a royalty free HDR10+ could eventually have more success than partially supported and seemingly hot mess of Dolby Vision.

    HDR10+ isn't "royalty free" – there's a yearly membership fee.
    Dolby Vision seems to be pretty much universally supported, Samsung being the big exception.

  11. JediFonger

    i'd like to see movies in HDR having a nits rating listed… that would be steller, like

    Black Panther, mastered at 500nits
    Justice League, mastered at 1k nits, etc.

    On the Oppo 203/205 for HDR10 titles when you push & hold the info button it displays maximum & minimum luminance of the disc.

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