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Dirac has announced a new auto target curve functionality for the Dirac Live solution that claims to “make it easier for consumers to get even better sound quality out of their sound systems.” The Dirac Live solution promises to generate an auto target curve based on a specific sound system’s measurements without users needing in-depth knowledge of room correction.

“Many of the first uses of Dirac Live—more than a decade ago—were in cinemas or high-end home theaters, where experts calibrated and tuned sound systems using Dirac Live. But that’s no longer the case,” said Jakob Ågren, Head of Product Management at Dirac. “With more mass-market AVRs now offering our breakthrough solution, Dirac Live has gone mainstream. However, when addressing this new, larger audience, it became clear that attaining the optimal sound experience should be as easy as possible. Our new auto target curve eliminates the need for manual adjustments, allowing new users to sit back and enjoy superior sound.”

The target curve should reflect the inherent character of the measured system minus the adverse acoustic effects of the room, according to the Swedish company. The more natural slope that results promises a more lifelike audio response and preservation of more of a speaker’s individual flavor, while tightening up performance. If more tweaking is required, the target curve can be manually adjusted with a simplified interface in the Dirac Live mobile app.

The auto target curve through the Dirac Live mobile app is available now, and the company will announce desktop functionality later this year. Currently, Dirac Live-enabled devices from NAD, Onkyo, Pioneer, Integra and Pioneer Elite are compatible with the mobile app. For more information, go to Dirac.

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John Dirk

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I'm confused. How is this any different than the previous stated goal of Dirac Live or any other room correction solution?
 

Dave Upton

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I'm confused. How is this any different than the previous stated goal of Dirac Live or any other room correction solution?
It's not. It's letting you play with the target curve in a mobile app, vs running the full Dirac software on a laptop and adjusting the target curve more manually
 

John Dirk

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It's not. It's letting you play with the target curve in a mobile app, vs running the full Dirac software on a laptop and adjusting the target curve more manually
Interesting. They're following Audyssey's model, except Audyssey has no desktop counterpart.
 

VonMagnum

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Interesting. They're following Audyssey's model, except Audyssey has no desktop counterpart.
Actually, it does have one now. It's called MultEQ-X and currently runs on Windows based computers. It's on the front page of Audyssey's site. Unlike the app version, it can also work with older non-XT32 versions of Audyssey. You can also remeasure just one speaker instead of starting over and quickly edit individual curves to compare the changes among other things. The big downsides are they want separate individual $200 licenses for each AVR unit you buy rather than the one app works with multiple AVRs and it's non-transferable.
 

John Dirk

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Actually, it does have one now. It's called MultEQ-X and currently runs on Windows based computers. It's on the front page of Audyssey's site. Unlike the app version, it can also work with older non-XT32 versions of Audyssey. You can also remeasure just one speaker instead of starting over and quickly edit individual curves to compare the changes among other things. The big downsides are they want separate individual $200 licenses for each AVR unit you buy rather than the one app works with multiple AVRs and it's non-transferable.
Welcome and thanks for the heads up. I had no idea this had been introduced but, as you point out, the licensing model (alone with Audyssey's notoriously poor bass management) make it pretty much useless for me.
 

VonMagnum

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I wasn't aware Audyssey had notoriously poor bass management and unlike the multi-subwoofer license DIRAC requires, it wouldn't cost me a dime extra on my Marantz 7012 to add a second subwoofer.

I went from +/- 5dB, which means swings up to 10dB, which is twice as loud or soft, in my home theater room (after testing the best spot and placing the seating away from the worst modes) to a significantly better +/- 1.5dB over the sub's range, which is better than the anechoic response of most speakers, let alone room response and that's only with one sub and not editing the automatic target curve and using a Definitive Technology PF-1500 subwoofer I bought clear back in 1995 no less. I don't think that's too shabby. Acoustic double bass note levels on George Michael's song Cowboys & Angels are so much more consistent and even now. I'd probably prefer DIRAC above the bass region, but I'm pretty happy with my bass response now.

Here's the REW graph from 10Hz-200Hz (sub crossed to PSB T-45 speakers at 80Hz), verifying actual response :

DefTechFreq Response 20to200.jpg

Overall corrected response (reference curve) (680Hz room dip makes it +/- 4dB overall, otherwise within a 2.5dB range around average, intentionally falling off above 10kHz. Bass is also intentionally boosted about 3dB above flat reference as I prefer it slightly warm):
PSB Ref Right.jpg
 

Dave Upton

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I wasn't aware Audyssey had notoriously poor bass management and unlike the multi-subwoofer license DIRAC requires, it wouldn't cost me a dime extra on my Marantz 7012 to add a second subwoofer.

I went from +/- 5dB, which means swings up to 10dB, which is twice as loud or soft, in my home theater room (after testing the best spot and placing the seating away from the worst modes) to a significantly better +/- 1.5dB over the sub's range, which is better than the anechoic response of most speakers, let alone room response and that's only with one sub and not editing the automatic target curve and using a Definitive Technology PF-1500 subwoofer I bought clear back in 1995 no less. I don't think that's too shabby. Acoustic double bass note levels on George Michael's song Cowboys & Angels are so much more consistent and even now. I'd probably prefer DIRAC above the bass region, but I'm pretty happy with my bass response now.

Here's the REW graph from 10Hz-200Hz (sub crossed to PSB T-45 speakers at 80Hz), verifying actual response :

View attachment 133649
Overall corrected response (reference curve) (680Hz room dip makes it +/- 4dB overall, otherwise within a 2.5dB range around average, intentionally falling off above 10kHz. Bass is also intentionally boosted about 3dB above flat reference as I prefer it slightly warm):
View attachment 133650
Audyssey is certainly better than nothing - but John is right when he says it has poor bass management. There's unfortunately a lot of things you have to do to essentially trick Audyssey into giving you a good calibration - level matching etc, particularly with multiple subs. For this reason, frequency response doesn't tell the whole story. A phase response from Dirac or ARC will generally be much better than Audyssey - especially near the crossover if you sweep into the mains.