3 Stars
mb6Gef7oSB6XGh8TMxthVmUFHIWMtb_large.

In the last film he made during the silent era, Charlie Chaplin revels in the art of the circus, paying tribute to the acrobats and pantomimists who inspired his virtuoso pratfalls. After being mistaken for a pickpocket, Chaplin’s Little Tramp flees into the ring of a traveling circus and soon becomes the star of the show, falling for the troupe’s bareback rider along the way. Despite its famously troubled production, this gag-packed comedy ranks among Chaplin’s finest, thanks to some of the most audacious set pieces of the director-performer’s career, including a close brush with a lion and a climactic tightrope walk with a barrelful of monkeys. Rereleased in 1969 with a new score by Chaplin, The Circus is an uproarious high-wire act that showcases silent cinema’s most popular entertainer at the peak of his comic powers.

FILM INFO

  • Charles Chaplin
  • United States
  • 1928
  • 71 minutes
  • Black & White
  • 1.33:1
  • Silent
  • Spine #996SPECIAL FEATURES
    • New 4K digital restoration of Charlie Chaplin’s 1969 rerelease version of the film, featuring an original score by Chaplin, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack on the Blu-ray
    • New audio commentary featuring Charlie Chaplin biographer Jeffrey Vance
    • Interview with Chaplin from 1969
    • New interview with Chaplin’s son Eugene Chaplin
    • In the Service of the Story, a new program on the film’s visual effects and production design by effects specialist Craig Barron
    • Chaplin Today: “The Circus,” a 2003 documentary on the film, featuring filmmaker Emir Kusturica
    • Excerpted audio interview with Chaplin musical associate Eric James
    • Unused café sequence with new score by composer Timothy Brock, and related outtakes with audio commentary by Chaplin historian Dan Kamin
    • Newly discovered outtakes featuring the Tramp and the bareback rider
    • Original recording of the film’s opening song, “Swing, Little Girl,” by Ken Barrie
    • Footage of the 1928 Hollywood premiere
    • Rerelease trailers
    • PLUS: An essay by critic Pamela Hutchinson

    New cover by Mark Chiarello

    September 24, 2019

Published by

Ronald Epstein

administrator

Ronald Epstein

Founder
Owner
Joined
Jul 3, 1997
Messages
55,549
Reaction score
11,261
Points
9,110
Real Name
Ronald Epstein
The price link below will take you directly to the product on Amazon. If you are using an adblocker you will not see link.

 
Last edited:

stevenHa

Second Unit
Joined
Sep 12, 2005
Messages
257
Reaction score
33
Points
110
Can someone explain what the 1969 version represents - is it lacking somehow from it's original 1928 release ?
 
  • Like
Reactions: battlebeast

B-ROLL

Cinematographer
Joined
May 26, 2016
Messages
2,569
Reaction score
2,326
Points
4,110
Real Name
Bryan
I'm speechless .. :drum::banana::dancing-banana-04::dance::rock::dancing-banana-04::cheers::popcorn::wave-hello::welcome:

You can thank me because I bought the Region B Artificial Eye collection from Amazon UK ;)...
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: PMF

Josh Steinberg

Executive Producer
Reviewer
Joined
Jun 10, 2003
Messages
18,423
Reaction score
22,824
Points
9,110
Age
37
Real Name
Josh Steinberg
Nice, I finally sold my Warner DVD copy just the other week. Perfect timing!
 

Dick

Lead Actor
Premium
Joined
May 22, 1999
Messages
8,423
Reaction score
5,141
Points
9,110
Real Name
Rick
If anyone here doesn't think monkeys can be really funny, I have a great silent double-feature for you: This film with Chaplin, and THE KID BROTHER with Harold Lloyd. I haven't laughed so hard for a decade as I did watching the Lloyd film.
 

atcolomb

Screenwriter
Joined
Mar 19, 2009
Messages
1,795
Reaction score
1,579
Points
1,610
Location
Chicago Area
Real Name
Angelo
I have seen most of his films but not this one. My local library system will get this when released and will check it out for sure.
 
  • Like
Reactions: PMF

Arthur Powell

Second Unit
Joined
Feb 15, 2018
Messages
382
Reaction score
786
Points
110
Age
40
Real Name
Arthur
Can someone explain what the 1969 version represents - is it lacking somehow from it's original 1928 release ?
For the most part not really. Unlike "The Gold Rush" and "The Kid," Chaplin didn't cut any material for this film's reissue. Once you get past the newly done main credits and Chaplin's "Swing, Little Girl" song, the film is editorially the same as what 1928 audiences saw.
 
  • Like
Reactions: PMF

Dick

Lead Actor
Premium
Joined
May 22, 1999
Messages
8,423
Reaction score
5,141
Points
9,110
Real Name
Rick
Once you get past the newly done main credits and Chaplin's "Swing, Little Girl" song...
...to say nothing of Chaplin's excruciating narration in place of intertitles and the overuse of his description of himself in the movie as "The little fellow." Takes me right out of the film. I stick to the silent.
 

battlebeast

Producer
Joined
Aug 10, 2010
Messages
3,075
Reaction score
1,539
Points
4,110
Age
36
Location
Edmonton, Alberta
Website
www.oscarmovs.com
Real Name
Warren
I’m so excited about this release I jhope st want to keep talking and talking about it. Lol

Apparently, around 2010, news outlets were playing the footage from the premier saying it proved time travel. They said it showed a woman with a cell phone; turned out to be an old 1920s hearing aid!
 
  • Like
Reactions: PMF

Ronald Epstein

Founder
Owner
Joined
Jul 3, 1997
Messages
55,549
Reaction score
11,261
Points
9,110
Real Name
Ronald Epstein
The price link below will take you directly to the product on Amazon. If you are using an adblocker you will not see link.

 

Arthur Powell

Second Unit
Joined
Feb 15, 2018
Messages
382
Reaction score
786
Points
110
Age
40
Real Name
Arthur
...to say nothing of Chaplin's excruciating narration in place of intertitles and the overuse of his description of himself in the movie as "The little fellow." Takes me right out of the film. I stick to the silent.
Count yourself lucky then. Chaplin fully intended to give the same treatment to "The Circus" after the relative success of the reissue of "The Gold Rush." However, he never went through with it perhaps because he was distracted by several other things - "Monsieur Verdoux," meeting Oona, and his Maury situation all come to mind. He did commission composer Hanns Eisler to compose music for the film, but I don't think the work was finished. That would have made an interesting Criterion featurette though.
 
  • Like
Reactions: PMF

battlebeast

Producer
Joined
Aug 10, 2010
Messages
3,075
Reaction score
1,539
Points
4,110
Age
36
Location
Edmonton, Alberta
Website
www.oscarmovs.com
Real Name
Warren
Is the full silent version still extant?

are they including BOTH versions or just the 1969 version?