Yuv - Rgb

Discussion in 'Playback Devices' started by Sam Davatchi, Oct 9, 2004.

  1. Sam Davatchi

    Sam Davatchi Producer

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    I have few questions regarding YUV and RGB. I’m a little confused. Please correct me where I’m wrong.

    I live in Europe and my widescreen 100hz TV has only SCART inputs.

    So here is what I believe is true. Composite, S-Video and Component work only in YUV. RGB is accessible only through SCART cables.

    1) If RGB is better than component (YUV) why only YUV accepts progressive and not RGB? I say this because when I put my DVD player to RGB output, it has no progressive option.
    2) Is it possible to feed a TV with a SCART input, with component video? All the SCART adapters I have seen here convert S-Video to SCART at best! No component to SCART!
     
  2. ChristopherDAC

    ChristopherDAC Producer

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    SCART connector allows RGB, S, and composite formats, as well as audio connexions. Composite and S are not exactly YUV, but they decode that way because they are based on a luma/chroma system. You can transcode YUV component to RGB component format; in fact a CRT display must do that in order to run the electron guns.
    As I understand it, for some reason the SCART standard does not support 30kHz scan frequency, but only the 15kHz of standard TV; on the other hand your 100Hz IDTV ought to have a good internal deinterlacer, in which case player deinterlacing shouldn't be an issue [you won't need to use progressive mode in the player]. If you must convert component to SCART, this is my advice: in the absence of a 3 pins YUV -- SCART breakout cable, use a component-VGA adaptor box or cable [which goes YUV-RGB or RGBS] and then a VGA-SCART connector which you should be able to get.
     
  3. Sam Davatchi

    Sam Davatchi Producer

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    Thanks. Why only YUV allows progressive and not RGB?
     
  4. Allan Jayne

    Allan Jayne Cinematographer

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    Both RGB and YUV allow progressive NTSC and PAL, U.S. HDTV scan rates, etc. It depends on what the particular equipment is set up to handle. There are currently a large number of video processors (e.g. Lumagen Vision) that can output, and a large number of CRT projectors that accept, a range of different scan rates and a custom scan rate to match a sweet spot (CRT size vs. beam fatness) can be chosen.

    Composite video and S-video are not progressive. Composite and S-video are usually constructed using YUV, and are usually converted to YUV by the TV prior to the final mandatory conversion to RGB.

    Although the SCART standard may not include it, progressive scan and/or YUV can be routed through SCART jacks and some TV sets may accept progressive scan and YUV that way.

    Video hints:
    http://members.aol.com/ajaynejr/compon.htm
     
  5. Sam Davatchi

    Sam Davatchi Producer

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    So this is strange. I will mention my source of confusion. I have purchased a new Pioneer DVD player the 575-A model.

    In the video output menu I have three settings.
    1) Composite
    2) S-Video
    3) RGB

    When I set the player to RGB, the progressive option is disabled.

    When I set it to S-Video, the progressive option is accessible and I can set it to progressive! I get a real difference between S-Video Interlaced and S-Video Progressive!

    Also as you see I don’t see any component output option on the video output menu!
     
  6. Sam Davatchi

    Sam Davatchi Producer

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    I looked at that page and it also says that S-video doesn't give progressive scan but how come I get progressive scan from S-video? I really do! [​IMG]
     
  7. ChristopherDAC

    ChristopherDAC Producer

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    That makes no sense. Are you sure your user menus aren't set up in reverse? Progressive should be disabled for Comp and S and Enabled for RGB if those are the three available modes. The only way to know for sure what you are getting would be to use a spectrum analyzer and find out if the Comp and S outputs really are putting out a signal with a 10 MHz bandpass; but since such a signal ought to be unintelligible, I think it may just be a fault with the menus [that is, Deselected appears as Selected]. Either that or the player is defective. The aforementioned spectrum analyzer, applied to any of the three R, G, B pins, would tell you if the signal has 5 MHz [interlaced] or 10 MHz [progressive] bandpass.
     

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