You're full of _______

Discussion in 'After Hours Lounge (Off Topic)' started by MarkHastings, Feb 26, 2006.

  1. MarkHastings

    MarkHastings Executive Producer

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    NO! Not S***! .... Baloney!

    I never knew that the expression was "You're full of Baloney!". While you can spell the sandwich meat as "Bologna" or "Baloney", it's incorrect to say "You're full of Bologna".

    Hmmm? Am I the only one who didn't know this??
    http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=baloney
     
  2. MichaelBA

    MichaelBA Supporting Actor

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    The OED says that "baloney" as spelled in the expression is commonly regarded as deriving from Bologna sausage, but "the connection remains conjectural."

    An amateur etymology I've seen is that the expression comes from an Italian saying, “L’oro di Bologna si fa nero per la vergogna” (“Gold from Bologna turns black from shame.”), which originated because a medieval market in Bologna traded in phoney gold. This hasn't been professionally established as connected to the English expression, however.
     
  3. Bryan X

    Bryan X Producer

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    Unless you just finished a Bologna sandwich. [​IMG]
     
  4. Joseph DeMartino

    Joseph DeMartino Lead Actor

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    No, the expression "is", "you're full of (bull)shit". "You're full of baloney" is simply a polite version of the same thought - originating from a time when the barnyard version was considered too vulgar for use in front of women and children. I'm willing to be that there is no such "Italian expression" and that the "amateur" etymology is really "folk etymology" - meaning a word origin not based on any kind or research or textual evidence but simply on someone's conjectural attempt to work backwards from the final word. Amateur etymology would be research done by a non-professional. That sometimes has some value. Folk etymology is generally - well, full of baloney and consists of made up stories that someone thinks sound plausible. (And which give us such entertaining nonsense a British archers having fingers amputated so that they could no long "pluck yew" and dozens of ancient words supposedly derived from acronyms despite the fact that such word formation was virtually unkown in English until WWI and didn't become common until after WWII.)

    Regards,

    Joe
     
  5. MichaelBA

    MichaelBA Supporting Actor

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    Hi Joe,

    The etymological speculation that "full of baloney" derives from the Italian expression I mentioned previously is definitely not a matter of folk etymology to my knowledge as I have personally read only one person make this conjecture and I am not aware that the connection of baloney to Bologna because of that Italian expression grew up out of popular lore among the Italian-American (or any other) community.

    As long as we're being precise, the speculative etymological suggestion of a single person certainly can't be regarded as an instance of folk etymology. Again, I may be wrong, and if I am I'd love to know what community made this connection between the American and the older Italian saying.

    Anyway, I'm not a linguist so I don't know if, like folk etymology, there is a specific definition of amateur etymology. All I meant to suggest in my posting was that the putative connection between baloney in the American expression to Bologna in the Italian expression was absolutely not professionally verified. Hence I used the word "amateur."

    M

    Edit P.S. -- As I am not, as I said, a linguist myself, I'm wondering if it could be proper to label even a single instance of a conjectured eytomological connection a matter of "folk etymology"? It seems certain to me that it can't, that a folk etymology has to be accepted by a particular group and not merely one individual, but I'm no professional on this subject so I don't know all the vagaries of jargon-usage. Joe, do you know?
     
  6. MarkHastings

    MarkHastings Executive Producer

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    Yeah, the dictionary link says it means 'nonsense', but what's confusing is, it shows that you can refer to the sandwich meat as Baloney, Boloney, or Bologna, but when you say "You're full of ____" it's either Baloney or Boloney.
     
  7. RickRO

    RickRO Stunt Coordinator

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    I think all of you are full of HOOEY!!!! Betcha never had a hooey sandwich before huh!!!!

    Now for the fraze "cold enough to freeze the balls off of a brass monkey!"

    Figure that one out and call me in the morning!
     

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