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Richard_Gregory

Second Unit
Joined
Aug 31, 2005
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361
Daft idea. Lots of problems.

First, it means you'll have to go to a store with a specific movie in mind. You won't be browsing the shelves...the stores won't like that much. Unless the idea is to have empty cases with display art. What does this save the stores, and how does it match against the extra costs implied by the below?

Second, it still takes time to burn a DVD, even using the fastest writers.

Third, it implies a huge centralised store of movies, and a very high capacity network going out to the stores. A multi-gigabyte download is still significant. Unless they mean that stores will keep the movies in a local server.

Fourth, I wouldn't trust DVD writeable media for a permanent purchase. There are most definitely issues of reliability and longevity for these dye based discs. It makes you wonder what quality of media the stores would be using; top-notch discs with Tayo Yuden dyes, or cheap and nasty stuff (I think I can guess). Also these discs are less tolerant of handling than the usual stamped variety.

Lastly, why not just offer the service direct to home? I can't see that having a store do this for you offers significant advantages over buying a standard DVD in said store. But enabling people to download and burn their own discs at home does (no trip to a store, no mail ordering and waiting, etc).

I think, if this idea was so good, they'd have already done it with CD's. That technology has been with us for some time. I don't think there are stores where you go and choose your music and have it burnt to a CD while you wait..?
 

MielR

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MielR
There was something, several years ago, a kind of "jukebox" idea that they had at some large music chains, where you chose a bunch of songs from a list of hits (you paid per song), and a CD was burned for you. This was before downloading became popular, but even then the idea didn't catch on.
 

Ethan Riley

Senior HTF Member
Joined
Oct 12, 2005
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It's just because of the reliability of burned media vs. pressed media. I maintain that disc technology has to improve by at least 100% before this idea is feasible, and it will improve, in about 10 years. So whoever came up with this idea needs to just wait awhile and not worry their little heads about it for now.

As for burned and/or written media, now you guys have gotten me worried about the dvds I've made myself on my little DVR. I have been using DVD+R to record tv shows. Should I be worried? So far they seem to be holding up well, but I do know that they scratch very easily. But what is the basic difference between DVD+R and DVD-R? (Quick answers, please don't refer me to other, very technical threads~!!!)
 

MielR

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I'm no expert, but there probably isn't much difference between DVD-R and DVD+R, I think the longevity of the disc is more determined by the type of dye used (better off sticking with name brand discs) and how the discs are stored (don't leave them in your car ;) )
 

Chuck Pennington

Supporting Actor
Joined
May 11, 2001
Messages
927
The best, most reliable media is made my Sony, Verbatim (though the branded ones at Sams I have had trouble with), and especially Taiyo Yuden. I have discs burned 5 yrs ago on these suppliers and they play perfectly. Actually, since they were burned at lower speeds, they play BETTER than discs I've burned within the past 2 yrs at faster speeds on faster media - lol

When I see people stocking up on Memorex (or Durabrand or some other store or off brand) media at Wal-Mart, I warn them that the odds of part of the discs being unreadable in a matter or weeks or months is VERY high. I have experienced this myself before I knew better.

For more info on quality media, go here:
http://www.digitalfaq.com/media/dvdmedia.htm
 

MielR

Advanced Member
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MielR
I use only Sony and TDK DVD-Rs, and haven't had any problems (yet).
 

Ethan Riley

Senior HTF Member
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Oct 12, 2005
Messages
4,111
I have used Sony and now I got some FujiFilm discs that I'm going to try. I have had no trouble with the Sonys. These are only movie dvds, not to be left in the car or wherever; I store them in those big binder thingies.
 

Richard_Gregory

Second Unit
Joined
Aug 31, 2005
Messages
361
There's not much difference between a DVD -R and DVD +R, they both use the same sort of technology - basically, a special type of dye that changes it's state when hit by a laser, thus recording information.

However, this means that the dye is to some extent inherently unstable, to a certain extent. This can cast doubts over the working lifetime of the disc when compared to the sort of DVD's you buy movies on (these are created by a stamping process, no dyes are involved). Also DVD recordable discs are more sensitive to rough handling and their environment - exposure to sunlight, for example, is very bad for them.

It is absolutely critical to ensure that the discs you use are manufactured to a high standard and use quality dyes. Unfortunately, a "big name" brand is no guarantee of this. It is best to buy discs from a store that indicates the manufacture pedigree of the disc; the best discs are those with "Taiyo Yuden" or "MCC" (Mitsubishi Chemical Corporation). These discs are made in Japan, or sometimes in other countries but by a Japanese manufacturer. Verbatim for example are well known for being of high quality, as are Sony, Maxell and TDK. Although even these companies have had flirtations with cheaper media.

Unfortunately, many of the big packs of discs sold in stores are sourced elsewhere, such as India, Taiwan, Korea and are of questionable quality. Those using cheap discs can expect two things: problems recording in the first place, and discs that mysteriously become unplayable in the future.

There is a FAQ about this at http://www.digitalfaq.com/media/dvdmedia.htm

I exclusive use Verbatim discs with a Taiyo Yuden dye. And even then I had one disc that mysteriously died on me after a gew months (although the rest are still fine after several years).
 

ted:r

Second Unit
Joined
Jun 23, 2005
Messages
336
I think this forum is missing the point. While I understand the technical difficulties and potential problems that have been mentioned, for me the main thing is the movie itself. I have rational fear that a great many movies will never find their way to DVD given the current process. Marketing will simply say there is no demand for them, besides collectors. So these movies will be forgotten about and ignored.

If this methods functions as a way to get movies out of the vaults and into our hands, I'm all for it. I imagine also that the manufacturers will keep an eye as to what titles are getting downloaded, and tag the more popular ones for "special releases', with all the extras so near and dear to our hearts.

Is there a potential for this being a disaster? Oh, yes. But there is a potential for it being a gold mine also.
 

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