Year 2002, cloning, nd Jurassic park

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Neil Joseph, Mar 13, 2002.

  1. Neil Joseph

    Neil Joseph Lead Actor

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 1998
    Messages:
    8,332
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Real Name:
    Neil Joseph
    With all of the cloning going on today I am wondering just how feasible it is to clone dinosaurs as was done in Jurassic park. I know this question was brought up a couple of years ago but there seems to have been "advances" made in the cloning process. Assuming mosquitos trapped in amber still have liquified dinoblood, can this be done?
     
  2. LDfan

    LDfan Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 1998
    Messages:
    724
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Nope, not even close. This was brought up in my genetics class a couple years ago. The technology just isn't there. Plus remember in the movie they had to fill in the missing pieces with amphibian DNA. Easier said then done. Maybe a few more years down the road we'll be closer to doing it but not yet.

    Jeff
     
  3. Kenneth

    Kenneth Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 1997
    Messages:
    757
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Yeah, I would think we still have lots of hurdles. Our gene splicing technology is still in its infancy and I don't think they are expert at doing this with animals yet (plant technologies on the other hand are getting pretty robust).

    Also, all the cloning activities currently use surrogate mothers, which favors mammalian cloning. I don't think reptiles are as easy. Certainly they don't have the technology to implant eggs yets. I would think they would need to clone some reptiles reliably before they could even think of attempting dinosaurs.

    Kenneth
     
  4. Inspector Hammer!

    Inspector Hammer! Executive Producer

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 1999
    Messages:
    11,061
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Houston, Texas
    Real Name:
    John Williamson
    Plus, even though this was a fictional charactor in a sci fi film, Jeff Goldblume has an excellent point, just because we CAN do it, doesn't mean we SHOULD do it. I think it's safe to assume that a T-Rex would be a pretty dangerous animal to control, not to mention Velociraptors etc...
    But I suppose if they HAD to clone dinosaurs, they should stick strictly to plant eaters like Brachiosaurus and Tricerotops.
    Alas this is all speculation as it's not feasable just yet.
     
  5. Mike D.

    Mike D. Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 1999
    Messages:
    97
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    If not today then, when? 20 years? Ever? Is there any fundamental reason why it will never happen? Setting aside ethical considerations, I just mean, will it ever be possible? I thought there was some discussion of cloaning that woolly mammoth that was recently discovered frozen.
     
  6. Ashley Seymour

    Ashley Seymour Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2000
    Messages:
    938
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
     
  7. Jared_B

    Jared_B Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    May 7, 2001
    Messages:
    580
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    The problem with that, Ashley, is that we don't know how dinosaurs act. Hell, we're not even sure how they look. I would be extremely interested in seeing a living, breathing dinosaur, just for educational purposes. I do think that this type of cloning will be possible, just not now. Whether or not it should be done is purely a matter of ethics, and that was not the question.
     
  8. Kwang Suh

    Kwang Suh Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 1999
    Messages:
    849
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I'd rather have scientists working on giving every man a clone of Heidi Klum first. [​IMG]
     
  9. Henry Carmona

    Henry Carmona Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2000
    Messages:
    1,299
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    San Antonio
    Real Name:
    Henry Carmona
    Im no geneticist, but isnt this assuming that the DNA they do find is insufficient and needs to have other DNA put in to fill in the missing part?
    Lets say they find a good quantity of it, what then.
    I remember reading about them trying to bring back the Wooly Mammoth since the specimen they found frozen in ice had plenty of DNA.
     
  10. Mike D.

    Mike D. Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 1999
    Messages:
    97
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
     
  11. MichaelPe

    MichaelPe Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 1999
    Messages:
    1,115
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
     
  12. Danny R

    Danny R Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    May 23, 2000
    Messages:
    871
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
  13. BrianW

    BrianW Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 1999
    Messages:
    2,563
    Likes Received:
    38
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Real Name:
    Brian
    I doubt very seriously that we'd be able to clone a dinosaur, ever. DNA is a very large and complex molecule that simply cannot withstand the ravages of time. Finding DNA a million years old, much less 65 to 235 million years old, intact enough to produce anything worthwhile, even with knowledgeable geneticists filling in the gaps, is simply not within the realm of possibility. To use an analogy, it would be like reconstructing a 3000-piece jigsaw puzzle from four microscopic scraps of cardboard from four different puzzle pieces.

    The woolly mammoth, however, is another story. Bringing back a creature only tens of thousands of years old that's been preserved (not fossilized), especially a mammal with living descendants, is something I would expect scientists to achieve within my lifetime.

    I say, bring it on.
     

Share This Page