YAMAHA's DSP's overlayed on DD/DTS....

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Matt Jesty, Aug 30, 2002.

  1. Matt Jesty

    Matt Jesty Second Unit

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    I have been experimenting more and more with these options and am having good results when the room initialization set-ups are done properly (initial/secondary delay and parameter adjustments)....anybody else been having fun with these soundfields?????
     
  2. Kevin C Brown

    Kevin C Brown Producer

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    I always liked Yamaha's DSP algorythms. Better than Sony's anyway... [​IMG]
    (Yamaha RX-V793 receiver-as-a-pre/pro vs Sony's TA-E9000ES pre/pro.)
    But the Sony has speaker-set adjustable crossovers (like the Outlaw 950, but years ago). Couldn't live without that.
     
  3. Bill Kane

    Bill Kane Screenwriter

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    Matt, you are the first Yamaha owner I've ever heard who's delved into "Sound Field Program Parameter Editing" as my manual calls it.

    I've left everything default because tweaking music reverb etc for the DSPs hasn't seemed a big priority. I usually dont use Concert, Church, Jazz et al anyway...

    You'll have to tell us what you're finding and for what audio sources. Is there a correlation in these setting to DVD soundtracks? I could a little more "liveliness" in my living room!

    bill
     
  4. Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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    I like “Cellar Club” for most music, and “70mm Adventure” for DD and DPL movies. I usually use them both at the default settings, although sometimes I’ll reduce the “Effect Trim” parameter on “Cellar Club” to tone it down a little.

    I don’t listen to a lot of classical music, but when I do I like one of the “Cathedral” setting.

    For TV shows, I like “Variety/Sports” for stereo (surround sound) programming (I think they may have eliminated this one on newer models).

    After some tweaking I got “Mono Movie” sounding pretty good for most mono programming. I found the default settings too “live,” so I reduced most of the parameters and eliminated the “echoey” reverb sound.

    The “Classical/Opera” and “Recital” selections can also be tweaked for TV use. I usually go for a “full” sound that doesn’t have a lot of echo or long decay.

    I tweaked “70mm Spectacle” specifically for when I watch Leno or Letterman. I increased the parameter settings to mimic the “sound” of a large auditorium, in keeping with the show’s natural setting. It makes dialogue sound a little “live” and “echoey,” but that’s the way it would sound if your were there in the audience.

    Regards,
    Wayne A. Pflughaupt
     
  5. RichardMA

    RichardMA Second Unit

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    DSPs in receivers and television sets on display in stores
    have one thing in common; The DSP's effect level defaults
    are generally way too agressive and the television pictures
    have way too much contrast. Both (on higher end products)
    can be controlled.
     
  6. Ron_L

    Ron_L Second Unit

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    I like 70MM Spectacle the best. Sounds just awesome in DTS.
     
  7. Bill Bradstreet

    Bill Bradstreet Stunt Coordinator

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    When I was in a townhouse, in a room that was less-than-ideal, I used the DSPs in my A3090 all the time. Now that I have a room that's rectangular with a ceiling (the townhouse was cathedral ceiling), I have found less use for the DSPs. Maybe it is just because I have to take the time to tweak the DSPs to fit this room, but I do like the straight-out-of-the-box Dolby ProLogic.

    My wife and I never listen to music in the TV room (so far), but once I connect the music system to the movie system we'll see if I start using Warehouse again.
     
  8. Marty Neudel

    Marty Neudel Stunt Coordinator

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    >DSPs in receivers and television sets on display in stores
    have one thing in common; The DSP's effect level defaults
    are generally way too agressive<

    Richard,

    you might want to listen to the Yamaha acoustic soundfield programs. While you can adjust them to your taste, they are, right out of the box, well-behaved and tested computer models of actual performance halls.

    Marty
     
  9. RobertSchaez

    RobertSchaez Stunt Coordinator

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    I adjusted most of the parameters down on my RX-V2095, since I felt they were a little too "aggressive", and it definitely helped. Now that I have a RX-V3000, I have been too lazy to do it yet. When I get off by butt, I am going to sit down and make a few adjustments. It does seem though, that the 3000's DSPs are alot more listenable right out of the box than my 2095. I do wish my 3000 had the full EQ option for every channel, like the RX-V1, not just for the center channel.
     
  10. Kevin C Brown

    Kevin C Brown Producer

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    One of the things I always liked about the Yamaha DSP programs, was that to me, they really seemed to *enhance* the soundstage (well, depending of which one you picked for what kind of source material).

    For the Sony for example, I could never find one that *didn't* make center channel human dialog harder to understand. (I.e., always seemed to me that the Sony algorythms tried to *smear* center channel dialog via reverb, delay, mixing to the right and left channels, etc.)
     

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