XP Home- NTFS or FAT32

Todd Hochard

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So I bought XP today- I'm a sucker for new stuff. Anyway, I was thinking that I'd like to go to NTFS for the file security aspect of it. You know, mainly to keep my wife out of my vast porn collection.
I'm kidding there, folks.
Anyway, I'm wondering if I can run NTFS at home, and still be able to use my Zip disks (which at 100MB are FAT) at work, and on my parents and in-laws computers. I often transport documents/files back and forth.
So, if I were to download something from the web, onto my NTFS C: drive, can I then drop said file onto my Zip disk (FAT), and read it on other computers running Win98/ME with FAT32?
Todd
 
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To borrow the Microsoft XP slogan, yes you can. It's totally seamless, just drag and drop, as always.
Unless you are a gamer, or you need every last shred of performance you can possibly wring out of your HD, there is very little reason to go with FAT32.
Quick note: the Home version of XP does not support NTFS. Just FYI, though you didn't specify which version you bought.
 

Pete_S

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Real Name
Pete Schlotter
Quick note: the Home version of XP does not support NTFS. Just FYI, though you didn't specify which version you bought.
Are you sure? The C drive on my new computer w/ Windows XP Home edition preinstalled is listed as having an NTFS file system, and I have the the ability to utilize file and folder permissions, compression, disk quotas, etc...
 

Joel Mack

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Quick note: the Home version of XP does not support NTFS. Just FYI, though you didn't specify which version you bought.
Interesting. My Home version does...
------------------
"The internet is a place where people from all over come together to
bitch about movies and share pornography."
 

Rob Gillespie

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If the security aspect is your only concern Todd then go ahead an use NTFS. It's inherently a better file system, but it can be a little picky on hardware.
I tried running my system on NTFS a little while ago and there was a noticeable drop in disk performance when moving around the desktop. Even to the point of MP3 playback having glitches and pops that weren't there before. I'm pretty sure it was caused by an issue with the CMD IDE controller on my Asus motherboard just not 'liking' NTFS as much. Many people report slightly better performance, so I guess I was just unlucky.
Remember that DOS and Windows 9x/Me cannot see NTFS partitions. That may not be an issue for you but it's worth remembering.
[Edited last by Rob Gillespie on October 27, 2001 at 03:53 AM]
 

Todd Hochard

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quote: You will have no problems copying files from an NTFS hard drive to a FAT Zip drive, or another FAT/FAT32 hard drive, and vice-versa. I do it all the time.[/quote]It occurred to me, after I put this topic up, that I do it all the time, too- I had forgotten about the one computer in our office with NT 4.0 on it. Duh!
The Home version must support NTFS, as it gives you the option of setting it up that way, and discusses it in the install book.
However, if I can't lock up files and directories to keep certain users out, then what's the point?
Also, I have an Asus P3V4X motherboard. Slot 1, VIA chipset. I wonder if this is similar to Rob's, and would I have the same problem? I'm running a 45GB 5400rpm Western Digital, so I really don't want file transfer getting a whole lot slower.
Todd
[Edited last by Todd Hochard on October 27, 2001 at 07:23 AM]
[Edited last by Todd Hochard on October 27, 2001 at 07:27 AM]
 

Rob Gillespie

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I doubt if it would be a 'whole lot' slower, but you wont know until you try. The main beef I had was with MP3 playback.
 

Jesse Leonard

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However, if I can't lock up files and directories to keep certain users out, then what's the point?
NTFS allows you to set permissions for folders and files. So if you have kids you want to keep out of certain folders, you can give permissions to that folder. You would set up different accounts (ie. one for you and one for your kids). You would give yourself a higher permission level (ie. administrator) than your children. Then you can assign permissions to folders that you don't want you kids to be able to get into. When they log in with their account, they will not be able to get to your files.
This is different than File Encryption. With the NTFS permissions I talked about above, anybody with an account that has the proper level of permissions can access your files (ie. anybody that has administrator permissions on the computer). With File Encryption, ONLY the person that encrypts the files/folders can access them. It isn't dependent on the level of permissions, just on who encrypted it.
NTFS should give you plenty of security with your children if you set up the accounts/permissions properly.
 

Todd Hochard

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That should work, then. I don't want our guests (friend's, in-laws, etc) to have access to our Quicken, Tax files, etc. Plus, since my in-laws and my parents are both getting broadband soon, I want to give them some network (VPN-style, no) access to our hard drives (makes serving up high-res granddaughter pics easier), but not EVERYTHING on the hard drive.
Thanks,
Todd
 

Darren Lewis

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Todd, be VERY careful about opening up you PC, or parts of it to the internet, especially if you've got sensitive financial info on it.
Might be worth opening another thread to get some ideas on this.
------------------
My HT My DVD Collection
 

Jeff R.

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May 31, 1999
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The default installation of XP home is to use FAT32. The default installation of XP Pro is to use NTFS. You can pick either file system with either version though during the installation process. There is even a utility in XP that will convert your FAT32 partition to NTFS without destroying any data. So, you can initially set it up with FAT32 and then change to NTFS sometime down the road. HOWEVER, once you go to NTFS, you can NOT go back to FAT32 without wiping out the drive. The utility only works one way.
 

Tony Woods

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Feb 6, 2001
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to tell you the truth, my hard drive actually benchmarked faster once I converted it to NTFS from Fat32(XP Pro) unsing SiSoft's Sandra 2001 benchmark suite. I have an Asus A7V w/ two 30gb Maxtor 7200rpms in ATA 100 Raid 0. very smokin
 

Steven K

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Also keep in mind that the cluster size of NTFS partitions is 4K (default).
[Edited last by Steven K on October 29, 2001 at 07:59 AM]
 

Jeff R.

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Uchendu,
The comparison guide states that XP home does not support file encryption with NTFS but Pro does. This is true. The NTFS file system has the added bonus of being able to encrypt the files but this is only supported with the Pro version. You can still set up and use NTFS with the home version but you will not be able to use the file encryption feature.
 

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