Xbox360

Discussion in 'Gaming' started by Ken Ingram, Nov 5, 2005.

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  1. Ken Ingram

    Ken Ingram Stunt Coordinator

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    Has anyone Heard of any XBOX 360 Games that are going to be in 1080i, so far I've only seen 720p announced.
     
  2. Evan S

    Evan S Cinematographer

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    From what I have heard they are ALL going to be in BOTH 720P and 1080i for TV's that cannot natively accept 720p, like mine can't.

    See this thread for more details (I hate to link to another website, but this has already been discussed....)

    http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?t=548087
     
  3. RAF

    RAF Lead Actor

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    Yes, all indications from all the major sources regarding the X360 say that both 720p and 1080i are output by the X360. A lot of confusion results because many people (including some of the sources cited here) seem to think that 1080i has to be better than 720p because 1080 is a bigger number than 720. That isn't the case at all. In real life situations (my displays will handle both 720p and 1080i - and soon I'll even have a 1080p display) I actually find 720p better for fast action (like sports). Remember that 720p is "progressive" and 1080i is "interlaced" so the vertical resolution on 720p is actually better (720 vs. 540 lines). True, the horizontal resolution on 1080i is better than 720p (1920 to 1280) so that's why it's somewhat even.

    The nice thing about the X360 is that it will provide output in its standards for everything up to 1080i including backward compatibility with 480i sets. So people don't have to run out and get new monitors to enjoy their X360 boxes. Things will just look a lot nicer if your set can display either 720p or 1080i.

    My only wish (and that will come with later game boxes) was for support for 1080p displays. A 1080p output on a game machine would really kick some serious butt.
     
  4. Zack Gibbs

    Zack Gibbs Screenwriter

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    I haven't kept up too closely with the new systems, but is the 360 actually incapable of 1080p? Also, I'd like to say that just because an image is interlaced doesn't mean its resolution is literally cut in half. With pre-recorded material, I would take 1080i over 720p any day. Although it's true for videogames it will be a case by case decision, as there are other things to consider.
     
  5. RAF

    RAF Lead Actor

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    Zach, I haven't seen 1080p mentioned as an output option for the X360 anywhere and I am acutely aware of such specs since I will shortly have a 1080p capable display in my home. All the literature and other information indicates 720p/1080i maximum output resolutions.

    And I wasn't implying that the resolution of interlaced is cut in half when converting to progressive. A 1080i output actually produces a 1920 pixels x 1080 interlaced lines image. This would be 2,073,000 pixels but in two interlaced fields to make up the "frame" therefore the actual resolution would be closer to 1,036,800 pixels per field. The progressive single field frame of 720p is 1280 pixels x 720 lines for a field resolution of 921,600 pixels - slightly less than the 1080i field, but close enough to make it appear just as sharp. My "540" reference was an attempt (perhaps a bad choice) to level the playing field a bit (no pun intended). [​IMG]

    The bottom line is that 720p and 1080i both look good and, depending on the source material, each could be considered the "best" format for viewing. As I said, I prefer 720p for images with a lot of motion, but 1080i usually is better for static images. And, of course, a lot of this has to do with what the broadcasters do with the source HD material when sending it out to us. A lot of cable and satellite 1080i stuff is compressed and that makes the 1080i stuff sometimes choppy.

    With the X360 at least (I think) the source material will be unprocessed as 720p and 1080i output so compression shouldn't be an issue (unless something is happening at the X360 output that I'm not aware of.)

    Finally, another good source for a bit more information on the relative merits of 1080i and 720p is contained here, a PDF file from Pioneer Electronics. It deals in slightly more detail with some of the characteristics of the two formats and what happens with different source materials.

    Yes, I would love the X360 to output 1080p, especially since I've looked far and wide for a 1080p set that accepts 1080p input (most of them don't at this point!) By next year we'll see a lot more sets that do this, but for now the manufacturers claim (to justify their lack of such input) that there is very little source material in 1080p out there. I was hoping that the X360 might be such a source, but evidentally not this time around. Maybe the Playstation 3 and Blu-Ray will get the ball rolling.

    (BTW, I'm looking at getting a HP DLP 58" 1080p set. It's one of the few "affordable" RPM's that has 1080p inputs, in both analog and HDMI formats. And, of course, my next FP will be 1080p input capable - when the prices come down from the stratosphere.)
     

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