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Blu-ray Review X-Men: Days of Future Past - The Rogue Cut Blu-ray Review (1 Viewer)

Matt Hough

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X-Men: Days of Future Past - The Rogue Cut Blu-ray Review

The seventeen additional minutes contained in The Rogue Cut of Bryan Singer’s X-Men: Days of Future Past don’t constitute anything earthshatteringly different from the original theatrical release, but the film as a whole does play remarkably well with the twenty-two alternate/extended/additional scenes which have been worked into the original framework. Otherwise, Singer and company’s revised opus remains a first-rate comic book adventure tale featuring a time travel story that doesn’t make one’s eyes roll and is riddled with exciting ways to reunite so many beloved characters from this most emotional and humanistic of the Marvel franchises.



Studio: Fox

Distributed By: N/A

Video Resolution and Encode: 1080P/AVC

Aspect Ratio: 2.40:1

Audio: English 7.1 DTS-HDMA, Spanish 5.1 DD, French 5.1 DD

Subtitles: English SDH, Spanish, Portuguese, Other

Rating: Not Rated, PG-13

Run Time: 2 Hr. 28 Min./2 Hr. 11 Min.

Package Includes: Blu-ray, Digital Copy, UltraViolet

keep case in a slipcover

Disc Type: BD50 (dual layer)

Region: A

Release Date: 07/14/2015

MSRP: $29.99




The Production Rating: 4/5

Under threat of complete annihilation from a squadron of highly advanced robotic warrior Sentinels who can mutate into facsimiles of the powers of any living mutant, Professor Xavier (Patrick Stewart) has Kitty Pride (Ellen Page) put Logan (Hugh Jackman) into a state where he can go back through time to 1973 in order to prevent Raven/Mystique (Jennifer Lawrence) from killing the inventor (Peter Dinklage) of the Sentinels during which operation her DNA is harnessed allowing the future Sentinels to be able to mutate into possessing the powers of any mutant just as she can. In order to pull off this risky changing of history, Logan must enlist the combined efforts of a despondent Charles Xavier (James McAvoy) and a vengeful Magneto (Michael Fassbender) who not only are in 1973 bitter enemies but also struggling with their own difficulties: Xavier with a loss of power by becoming addicted to drugs which will allow him to walk again and Magneto who’s ten stories underground at the Pentagon, captured and imprisoned for his involvement in the JFK assassination ten years earlier.

 

Simon Kinberg’s marvelous script allows him to have not only our most familiar mutant warriors on hand but also work in others even if they’re only around for a few scenes. One of the film’s most accomplished sequences, for example, involves Peter/Quicksilver (Evan Peters), a necessary ingredient in order to get Logan underground in order to release Magneto. A bravura kitchen sequence where he outraces a hail of gunfire to save his friends while all the time having his own bit of fun in the process comes early in the movie, and his character pretty much disappears after that, but it’s so kinetically delightful a scene, so magnificent in the acting, directing, and special effects work that it’s just a pleasure to gape in awe of what can be accomplished today in movies. The film is filled with such awe-inspiring moments: Magneto’s ripping apart an entire stadium and using it for his own purposes, Xavier’s first moments returning to his beloved lair with its eye-popping pyrotechnic display, and the introductory mutant war with the Sentinels featuring all of the time warping and dazzling firepower in full array. And when the time comes for emotions to come to the fore, the script never makes a wrong move with earnest pleas between characters to think before they act, when characters struggle to figure out their next moves, and in the film’s most nakedly affecting climactic moment when Logan gets his reward for a job well done, the movie shows it can combine the comic book fantasy with real world emotions and be all the better for it.

 

Though it’s terrific seeing Ian McKellen, Patrick Stewart, Halle Berry, Anna Paquin (in the scenes featuring her as Rogue which were edited out of the theatrical cut) and others of the old guard again, the film still belongs firmly to the new (old) generation: Michael Fassbender’s dynamic, driven Magneto, James McAvoy’s pained and poignant Xavier (though he and Patrick Stewart share a scene that’s immensely powerful), Jennifer Lawrence’s single-minded Raven, and Nicholas Hoult’s entertaining Hank. Of course, Hugh Jackman’s quintessential Logan/Wolverine is the focus of the film (he gets top billing among all of these award-winning stars), and he has admirably made strides in making this version of his iconic character a bit advanced from his last foray in The Wolverine. Peter Dinklage is as sure-footed and solid as always as the highly motivated Dr. Bolivar Trask, and Shawn Ashmore as Iceman, Daniel Cudmore as Colossus, and Bingbing Fan as Blink (who opens portals to different times) all make firm impressions.



Video Rating: 5/5  3D Rating: NA

The film, both the original theatrical release and the new Rogue Cut, is presented in its 2.40:1 aspect ratio and is offered in 1080p resolution using the AVC codec. The future sequences are bathed in blackness emphasizing the bleak, stormy future that the mutants are facing, and the black levels are indeed outstanding with superb shadow detail. The 1973-set majority of the film offers outstanding sharpness and solid, rich color rendition with believable and appealing flesh tones. Contrast is perfectly modulated throughout the movie. The original film has been divided into 40 chapters while the Rogue Cut has 44 chapters with the timeline identifying which scenes are different from the original cut.

 

The film was shot in native 3D, but that version of the film is not offered here.



Audio Rating: 5/5

The DTS-HD Master Audio 7.1 sound mix present for both the original film and the Rogue Cut offers just the kind of immersion one requires of these comic book adventure films. The entire soundstage is utilized to the max in terms of split surround effects with frequent pans across and through the soundfield, and John Ottman’s music likewise receives a full spread through the fronts and rears. LFE channel activity stays busy throughout the enterprise with wonderful bass effects that you’ll feel at certain key moments.



Special Features Rating: 4/5

Original Theatrical Release (121 minutes, HD): the Rogue Cut is the default cut on the first disc, but this original version is available from the menu.

 

Audio Commentaries: director Bryan Singer is present for audio commentaries for both cuts of the film. On the original theatrical cut, he’s joined by screenwriter Simon Kinberg for the livelier of the two tracks. For the Rogue Cut, he’s joined by film editor-composer John Ottman.

 

Second Screen App: supplementary device application for use with phones and tablets while viewing.

 

All of the other bonus materials are present on a second Blu-ray disc in the set.

 

Mutant Vs. Machine (52:41, HD): a thorough making-of feature with many vital members of the cast and crew commenting on the production. Among those are director Bryan Singer, writer Simon Kinberg, original comic writers Chris Claremont and John Byrne, producers Lauren Shuler Donner and Hutch Parker, production designer John Myhre, costume designer Louise Mingenbach, cinematographer Newton Thomas Sigel, editor-composer John Ottman, sound designer Craig Berkey, special effects supervisor Derek Spears, and actors Hugh Jackman, James McAvoy, Michael Fassbender, Halle Berry, Nicholas Hoult, Ellen Page, Peter Dinklage, Evan Peters, Ian McKellen, and Patrick Stewart.

 

X-Men: Unguarded (30:11, HD): a roundtable discussion about their experiences with the franchise featuring director Bryan Singer, writer Simon Kinberg, and actors Hugh Jackman, James McAvoy, Michael Fassbender, Halle Berry, Nicholas Hoult, Ellen Page, Peter Dinklage, Evan Peters, Ian McKellen, Patrick Stewart, Shawn Ashmore, and Omar Sy.

 

Art Gallery (HD): three different step-through galleries featuring storyboards, costume designs, and production design concept art for the many massive sets on the movie.

 

Fantastic Four Sneak Peak (1:49, HD): a bit of behind-the-scene sound bites and film clips for the upcoming movie.

 

Digital Copy/Ultraviolet: code sheet enclosed in the case.



Overall Rating: 4/5

There are new bonus features in this set, and fans of the original film will undoubtedly enjoy seeing a slightly revamped version of the original X-Men: Days of Future Past, but with no 3D present for the new cut, it’ll be up to the individual to decide whether he wants to double dip on this particular release. For those who haven’t indulged before, the movie in either cut is definitely recommended.


Reviewed By: Matt Hough


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PaulDA

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For the sake of completeness, I might eventually pick this up. However, I think I can wait until it's part of a "bargain bin" sale of some sort. Not enough time to watch things I've yet to see at all, let alone revisit things (even those I like a lot) these days. Ah well, my film collection has become my retirement project (assuming appropriate playback gear remains available and reliable by then :lol: ).
 

Matt Hough

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Cameron Yee said:
Any thoughts on the difference Anna Paquin makes?
For me, none. Otherwise, I would have mentioned it. That's why I said in the opening paragraph that the film wasn't substantially different than before even with the added scenes.
 

Mark-W

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I will add my $0.02, as I just picked this up due to the extras, as I love commentary tracks. I agree with most of what Matt says, and I think the changes and micro-inserts/alternate takes add touches of complexity and, in some cases, also negatively impact the pacing.


In the Rogue Cut, we get more touchy-feely character moments. I love those.


As for Anna Paquin's moments, I am glad I have them now, and this is my preferred cut, but I can see why the theatrical cut is the one that got released.


A rescue mission in the middle of the movie to save Rogue does feel odd.
.


At $17.99 at Target with an additinal 5% off for using my Target Visa made this an easy purchase for me.
 

Sean Bryan

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Cameron Yee said:
Any thoughts on the difference Anna Paquin makes?
Interestingly, I don't think the stuff with her added much of anything. I do like much of what was added elsewhere in the film, but I think the actual Rogue stuff wasn't necessary and I can absolutely see why Singer cut it for the theatrical.

It felt a bit weird with
Xavier, Magneto, and Bobby leaving everyone in the temple in China to go rescue Rogue
at that point in the story. Though it did add an explanation for how they were found in China, I never felt that was something that was "missing" from the theatrical cut.

Also, part of this sequence was intercut with Magneto stealing his helmet out of the Pentagon in 1973. The way it was intercut was fine if that's how it had always been. But being familiar with the original scene when he walks into the Pentagon with that threatening, thumping score playing and takes it back like a bad-ass, I found that cutting that up and jumping back and forth to the future rescue diminished the flow of the 1973 scene.

It's hard to say if I prefer this or the theatrical. I usually wind up preferring extended cuts when they expand on some aspects of the story and characterizations and let things breath better or maybe even just add some additional action beats. I definitely prefer the Extended cut of The Wolverine for those reasons.

But here, I'm not sure. I do think there was a decent amount of the type of expansion I usually like spread throughout the movie, but that was mostly stuff at the beginning in 2023 China before the time travel and stuff in 1973. There was also some nice stuff between Raven and Hank. There was no actual interaction between them in the theatrical version, but they had an established dynamic in First Class. This added a scene that followed up on that a bit, which i think worked pretty well. But I don't think the actual "Rogue" part of the "Rogue Cut" added anything significant and actually slightly detracted from a pre existing scene of the theatrical.

So I guess I'd say I might prefer the Rogue Cut over the theatrical cut if it didn't have the Rogue parts and was just a more traditional extended version.
 

Brett_M

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I recently purchased this but the movie disc will not play in my DMP-BD80 player. The firmware is up to date. Anyone else have this issue? Panasonic Customer Service was unable to help except to say the disc is not compatible with my player. That's a new one for me.
 

Robert Crawford

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Brett_M said:
I recently purchased this but the movie disc will not play in my DMP-BD80 player. The firmware is up to date. Anyone else have this issue? Panasonic Customer Service was unable to help except to say the disc is not compatible with my player. That's a new one for me.
Some of these older BD players are not compatible with some of these new discs.
 

Jonathan Perregaux

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I enjoyed it, but this cut makes it clear that everyone should be dead--if you consider the franchise as a whole. The movie makes direct references to X-Men: The Last Stand, and yet shoots itself in the quickly-healing foot by offering no explanation at all for Rogue's crucial participation in this. She was cured in X3 and is no longer a mutant.

So much for her "choice."

I'll ignore Magneto for now since he wiggled a chess piece slightly at the end of X3, plus he's a Level 10 mutant.
 

Brett_M

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Well, I finally got the Rogue cut to play...by buying a new blu-ray player. I liked it. It plays a bit better than the theatrical cut.
 

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