WSJ Article on Film Censoring Industry

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Craig Cunningham, Sep 19, 2002.

  1. Craig Cunningham

    Craig Cunningham Stunt Coordinator

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    Today's edition of The Wall Street Journal (9-19-02) has an eye-opening article about how a Utah company has been santizing films for the Mormon population.
    For those that have an online subscription to WSJ, here's the article link:
    Utah's Cottage Film Editors Have Hollywood Crying Foul
    I was under the impression that only the studios could alter films for release. The Hollywood establishment is obviously very upset about it.
    Should they be allowed to do this? I think they are modifying copyrighted materials and it should be illegal.
     
  2. Craig Cunningham

    Craig Cunningham Stunt Coordinator

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    What types of edits being performed? Here's a list from the article:

    • "Saving Private Ryan": About 4.5 minutes, most from the bloody, opening beach-landing scene.

    • "Training Day": Three to four minutes. Thirty seconds of the final scene, a violent shootout in a car, is excised.

    • "Bridget Jones's Diary": About two minutes, mostly sexual situations.

    • "Shrek": About 30 seconds of profanity, some sexual innuendo.

     
  3. Jeff Kleist

    Jeff Kleist Executive Producer

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    It's been discussed quite a bit before

    The bottom line is that it is illegal, as these edits are being performed NOT by the end user, and for profit without authorization from the copyright holder

    They are also breaking the DMCA to produce these versions
     
  4. Craig Cunningham

    Craig Cunningham Stunt Coordinator

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    If this is an obvious copyright infringement, why hasn't anything been done about it? This has apparently been going on for years in Utah.

    In addition to theater releases, they are now modifying home video releases. It's just not like the studios to sit back and let someone trample their property rights.
     
  5. David Rogers

    David Rogers Supporting Actor

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    The only kind of copyright infringement Content Companies (including Hollywood Studios, also RIAA member companies, Publishing houses, etc...) care about is the type that results in their losing a sale.

    The way they see these reedit companies, that's a purchase of their film from a customer who self-says they probably wouldn't have otherwise.

    The CCompanies could *care less* that Directors, Writers, Actors, and other creative folks involved are offended with the meddling to their work.

    Money talks, and it's all Corporate America hears.
     
  6. Lew Crippen

    Lew Crippen Executive Producer

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  7. Ken Chan

    Ken Chan Producer

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  8. Patrick McCart

    Patrick McCart Lead Actor

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    The ONLY censorship that is alright is from the filmmakers themselves.

    Sure, I can see how Training Day and other movies "benifit" from censorship. Where it crosses the line, such as censoring a movie like Saving Private Ryan...

    First of all, SPR's violence is realistic and isn't Hollywood-ized. If you want to present a less gory (but less accurate) movie on D-Day, show The Longest Day.

    What gets me is the censorship done for The Princess Bride. They say that it doesn't hurt the impact of the film...bullshit. How does painting lightsabers over fencing swords not impact a movie? For Kung Pow: Enter The Fist, that's one thing. For a movie that is supposed to take place in the middle ages, it's just graffiti.

    I'd love to see what the censored version of The Phantom Menace looks like...I guess they use tube balloons instead of lightsabers, eh?

    Censorship is under no circumstances something that can't hurt the impact of a film. It always does.
     
  9. Glenn Overholt

    Glenn Overholt Producer

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    But pan and scan does that too.... Just a thought.

    Glenn
     

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