Would like your professional opinions - which is better?

Discussion in 'Displays' started by MarkDude, Jul 22, 2006.

  1. MarkDude

    MarkDude Stunt Coordinator

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  2. Joseph DeMartino

    Joseph DeMartino Lead Actor

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    I have to wonder how two sets with such similar specs can be going for the same price when one includes a built-in DVD player and the other doesn't. [​IMG] Is the DVD unit an older or inferior model about to be discontinued? I'm not familiar with either unit, but that's the question that first came to my mind.

    Other than that it seems like six of one and half-a-dozen of the other. You mention being a college student, so some additional information would help folks advise you:

    1. Do you live at home, in a dorm, or in a off-campus apartment (shared?)

    2. Will the TV move back and forth with you? Start and end of each academic year? Each semester? Never? (Each of the sets you're looking at weighs over 100 lbs., so this is something to think about.)

    3. How much is space an issue where you are now? Would something that could double as a computer monitor make sense for you?

    4. What is your HD programming source at school? At home? (Over-the-air antenna? Cable? Satellite?)

    5. How long until you graduate? How long do you anticipate the TV you buy today being the main TV in your home theater?

    Regards,

    Joe
     
  3. MarkDude

    MarkDude Stunt Coordinator

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    I was wondering the same thing, especially since they're both Toshiba. Is the TheaterWide feature and the fact that it's flat-tube more important than the other one's built-in DVD player/USB input?

    1) I'm living in a 1-bedroom apartment (by myself) with a pretty spacious living room.

    2) I just signed a 13-month lease, so this'll be staying in one spot for at least a year.

    3) I am not cramped in terms of space. I've got my computer/monitor already installed, so that's not an issue.

    4) Right now I don't have anything but I will be getting digital cable installed early next week.

    5) I'm graduating next year, with no idea of where I'll end up living after that. Chances are good I'll be moving out to the West coast, but I do plan on being able to move this TV, even if it is 100+ pounds.

    Thanks for your help!
     
  4. Joseph DeMartino

    Joseph DeMartino Lead Actor

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    Thanks for the info. If your some of your answers had been different I would have suggested that you consider some of the newer LCD flat-panels like the Westinghouse 27" (for $799) that was in your search results. But in your situation and if a 30" is a big enough screen for you to comfortably watch 4:3 material (which is going to be smaller on a 30" widscreen than it would on a comparable 30" standard set, just was widescreen material will be larger), then a direct view CRT is the way to go in terms of both price and picture quality.

    I still don't know what the techinical differences between the sets amount to, but given the identical price, they have to be there. As far as I know "Theaterwide" is not a "feature", just a name that Toshiba puts on its widescreen TVs. I bought a 56" Toshiba "Theaterwide" analog rear projection set before digital and hi-def sets were an option. And, according to the product specs and pictures, both these sets are 16:9 and both have flat screen CRT picture tubes.

    Looking at the product specs there don't seem to be many differences apart from the number and types of inputs and outputs, none of which would be cripplingly bad if you don't have a ton of components to connect. However, I'm not sure I trust the spec sheets because one has a glaring mistake - technology type is given as "LCD Panel", which it clearly can't be at this price.

    I hope some owners of one or both contribute to the thread before the sale ends. If not, I'd go to the store and eyeball both, check the connectors and make sure each has enough for whatever you plan to do, and then by the one that looks best. You get a free DVD player with one, but even Toshiba standard-def DVD players aren't expensive these days. I tend to avoid combo units because if one part breaks I don't have either while it is being fixed, but YMMV.

    Good luck with the selection and with school.

    Regards,

    Joe
     
  5. Reginald Trent

    Reginald Trent Screenwriter

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    I never recommend buying a TV with built in VCR and or DVD because if the DVD goes out you have to take the TV to the shop also. Meaning you would be without one or the other if either ever has to be taken in for repairs.
     

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