Would D-VHS be another laserdisc?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Thik Nongyow, Aug 2, 2002.

  1. Thik Nongyow

    Thik Nongyow Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2002
    Messages:
    189
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I mentioned the Betamax and laserdisc video formats that did not catch-on with the buying public, but what about the emerging D-VHS format? I am told that it has superior image quality and higher storage than DVD, but would it be like another laserdisc?
     
  2. Jeff Kleist

    Jeff Kleist Executive Producer

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 1999
    Messages:
    11,267
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    It was always intended to be laserdisc. A niche format to keep the enthusiasts happy until HD-DVD
     
  3. Dustin B

    Dustin B Producer

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2001
    Messages:
    3,126
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I sure hope Jeff is right. Why you would go back to a tape format is beyond me.
     
  4. Thik Nongyow

    Thik Nongyow Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2002
    Messages:
    189
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    With HD-DVD, would it make current DVD players out of date and had to be replaced? I am surprised that video technology is going quicker than I thought. The next thing, we will be watching movies on memory sticks![​IMG]
     
  5. Grant H

    Grant H Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2002
    Messages:
    2,844
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    D-VHS WILL probably be another laserdisc, EXCEPT that when we try to pick up used players and tapes on eBay in the future for cheap like can sometimes be done with LD'S and equipment, the D-VHS players will break easier, (the complexity of tape-playing mechanisms) and the old tapes will play like sh** from wrinkles and degradation. Sure, no static, just nice total blips of picture and sound.
    At least the well-made laserdiscs of yesteryear still play like new (with a few laser-rot exceptions of course [​IMG])
     
  6. Malcolm R

    Malcolm R Executive Producer

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2002
    Messages:
    13,441
    Likes Received:
    1,055
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Real Name:
    Malcolm
    I doubt it will be as successful as laserdisc. I know I have quite a laserdisc collection, but have no interest in another tape-based format regardless of the image quality.
     
  7. Dan Brecher

    Dan Brecher Producer

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 1999
    Messages:
    3,450
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
     
  8. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 1999
    Messages:
    16,738
    Likes Received:
    129
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Well, Dan, ol' buddy, I agree with you in essence--that D-VHS D-Theater might end up as a niche format. But please note that only a few studios supported DVD when it was launched. And DIVX (pardon my language) impeded DVD's progress initially.

    Like it or not, if you want the absolute best picture quality in your home theater, D-Theater is the solution. For now.
     
  9. Dan Brecher

    Dan Brecher Producer

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 1999
    Messages:
    3,450
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
     
  10. Jay Blair

    Jay Blair Second Unit

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2001
    Messages:
    333
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    "D-VHS WILL probably be another laserdisc, EXCEPT that when we try to pick up used players and tapes on eBay in the future for cheap like can sometimes be done with LD'S and equipment, the D-VHS players will break easier, (the complexity of tape-playing mechanisms)"

    I would say that D-VHS players will be more reliable than laserdisc players. I've owned 5 laserdisc players from Pioneer, including a 703, a 704, and a 3090, the high end non-Elite models, and all three of these models have had to be serviced numerous times. The 703 could never be fixed and was shipped back to Pioneer under warranty, the 3090 still works and now lives with a friend but had its guts completed replaced (thankfully under warranty) to get it working again, and the 703 is in need of a major overhaul at this time and was serviced once before. Turning those big discs takes lots of muscle and wear and tear. The other two lower end Pioneer players I own never needed service but only because they were both stolen before they got old. (Yes, technically I still own them, I just don't have use of them anymore).

    That's a much worse track record than the three high end JVC S-VHS machines I've owned, one no longer works properly but the other two are doing just fine and have never eaten a tape. Good VHS machines rarely eat tapes if you keep them clean. And as for media, laserdiscs had (have) lots of problems, starting with rot. Some early discs had a nearly 100% failure rate. I love laserdisc, still have close to 100 discs, and a replacement player for the 704 will be here Monday, but the format was never highly reliable.

    One other point, how often does any one usually watch a favorite movie, maybe 10 or 15 times. The D-Theater tapes will easily do that. And if there is a film that you really do watch over and over again, just buy two tapes to have one as a back up, still no more expensive than laserdisc, many of which cost $60 or $70 retail for one film with little or no extras.

    Actually, one other thing. I have no desire at this time to get into D-Theater, as much as I'd love to check it out in my home theater. I can wait for HD-DVD a few years down the road.
     
  11. Thomas Newton

    Thomas Newton Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 1999
    Messages:
    1,566
    Likes Received:
    43
    Trophy Points:
    1,610
     
  12. Ken Garrison

    Ken Garrison Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2002
    Messages:
    543
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Memory sticks would be cool. Memory stick with 100 GBs of room to hold High Definition Video, DTS sound, deleted scenes, bloopers, and a bunch of other shit and still have room for MORE! One problem would be Electronic Static Discharge. One zap and your movie is dead. I do fear DVD being unreliable if one little hair line scratch is on it. Although, it don't affect CDs. I fear a little scratch like that will cause the movie to jitter and skip a bit. But Memory sticks would be cool if treated right.
     
  13. ChrisLee

    ChrisLee Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2001
    Messages:
    104
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Memory sticks?!? I'm not one to assume that smaller is always better. I wait for the day when we'll have virtual expericences with movies ala Star Trek Holodeck or Matrix brain stem connections...

    And so my post isn't entirely off topic: D-VHS will NOT be another laserdisc.
     
  14. Hakan Powers

    Hakan Powers Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 1999
    Messages:
    244
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Dan,

     
  15. Jeff Kleist

    Jeff Kleist Executive Producer

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 1999
    Messages:
    11,267
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I personally will be shocked if HD-DVD does NOT use MPEG-4
     
  16. Peter Apruzzese

    Peter Apruzzese Producer

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 1999
    Messages:
    3,575
    Likes Received:
    1,238
    Trophy Points:
    4,110
    Real Name:
    Peter Apruzzese
    While I'd like D-VHS (the D-Theater variety, anyway) to be a huge hit - if only to push forward the HDTV future - if it's only as successful LaserDisc, I'd be thrilled. After all, LaserDisc had a nearly 20-year life and offered tens-of-thousands of titles for sale.
     
  17. Dan Brecher

    Dan Brecher Producer

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 1999
    Messages:
    3,450
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
     
  18. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 1999
    Messages:
    16,738
    Likes Received:
    129
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I'm just happy we're having a rational discussion about D-Theater for a change. Thanks!

     
  19. Steve Bjorg

    Steve Bjorg Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    May 9, 2002
    Messages:
    114
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    A minor thought for those believing in HD-DVD (and others): how do you think the transition will go for regular consumers? See, for DVD there wasn't ground for confusion they contained video and could not be confused for CDs. However, as the DVD-A debacle is showing us, the masses aren't really interested in the fine print. They just want their purchases to line up with their expectations.

    So, for anyone saying that HD-DVD is just around the corner, you must first make a compelling case for the transition period. It doesn't matter if blue-ray lasers are feasible or not. If the product is called HD-DVD, there will be a lot of people that think that it runs on their regular DVD players. I think it is this hurdle that will be hardest for HD-DVD to overcome. On the otherhand, DVHS has less of a risk, because regular consumers have mostly been educated about the superiority of DVD and therefore wouldn't even consider tapes anymore.

    I for one don't care what the carrier is -- punch cards are fine too -- but I want the convenience of pre-recorded HDTV material.
     
  20. Jay Blair

    Jay Blair Second Unit

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2001
    Messages:
    333
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Jack, I couldn't agree more. Even on VHS tape, there are 3 or 4 films I've watched probably over 50 times. And the fact is, not one of these professionally recorded tapes has ever destructed. I'm a huge Nic Roeg fan and many of his films were never released on laserdisc, let alone on DVD (BAD TIMING and CASTAWAY in particular are great films). I even still have Beta tapes of a couple films that were taped off cable in the early to mid-80's that are still intact and playable on my Toshiba Hi-Fi Beta machine (my first introduction to home theater, and these machines were built like tanks, and though the Toshiba will no longer fast forward or rewind, the tapes still play fine).

    Based on my experience and on the experience of a couple friends with Sony Beta and Super-Beta players, I'd say tapes have about a twenty year and 100 to 200 viewings lifespan. After that the tape oxide is prone to flaking off. I suspect that D-Theater tapes will do at least as well.
     

Share This Page