World's most expensive steaks

Bob McLaughlin

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I bet that would be even more expensive in the form of jerky. Jerkying any meat always makes it even more expensive.
(Wait, that didn't sound right).
 

TV555

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Tom Veryal
I can't comment, but I would eat all of them.

Has anyone actually tried these super Japanese cuts of steak? I haven't.

Seriously, what is it that justifies the price and I am usually willing to not flinch at any bill under $100.

Is it better meat or is it lack of supply? What keeps the US and other countries from simulating their cowherding techniques in large supply? It's not like they are sleeping w/ the cows and producing little minotaurs.
What justifies this price from those that have partaken?
 

Jay H

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I'll take two... Because they look so small that I'd still be hungry after 1 of those plates.



I've had "fake" kobe beef at a chain called California Pizza Kitchen. Obviously fake cause it wasn't $100/oz...

Jay
 

MarkHastings

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Tom, I was thinking the same thing...Anytime I see something for such a ridiculously high price, it isn't as impressive because I know most of the price is probably due to it being served in a "Foo-Foo" manner.

What's the beef really worth? Who cares what the restaurant charges for it. Marking up a $20 burger to $600 just because the place is trendy, doesn't really signify the true meaning of "Most Expensive Burger" to me. I'd be more curious about a burger that sells for $60 (before any markup) over the aforementioned $600 burger.

Like that $30 an ounce. That's insane!!! I bet it's made of people.
 

MarkMel

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From wikipedia;

Kobe beef refers to beef from the black Tajima-ushi breed of Wagyu cattle, raised according to strict tradition in Hyogo Prefecture, Japan. Kobe is the capital of Hyogo Prefecture. Wagyu ("Japanese Cattle") are renowned for flavor, tenderness, and fatty well-marbled texture, qualities enhanced by the traditional (and well guarded) methods of raising Kobe beef. Tajima-ushi cattle reportedly receive regular massages and are fed hops.

Japan claims Kobe beef as a geographical indication- it may only be called that if raised and slaughtered in Hyogo Prefecture, Japan. Outside of Japan, the meat is usually sold as "Kobe style beef" or "Wagyu".



A cool article on Kobe beef.

http://members.tripod.com/~BayGourmet/wagyu.html
 

Patrick_S

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They are nothing more then the Bose of steak.


I have had Kobe a couple of times when I have taken various clients out and it was a very good steak but it hardly head and shoulders above anything else I have ever had. In fact it wasn't any better then a good quality aged steak one would get from a very good restaurant.

The expensive price is a result of limited supply and good marketing, hence my reference to it being the Bose of Steak.
 

Tom Fynan

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I just got back from a vacation in Japan, and we ate Kobe beef in Kobe.
It is very different from any steak or beef I've had at home. It's very heavily marbled with thin veins of fat, and very, very tender-literally melt in your mouth. The flavor was also much better than, and unlike any other steak I have eaten. My partner described it as "like eating the essence of beef." We ate at a teppenyaki restaurant, where the chef grills the meat at your table (think Benihana, but subdued) along with vegetables, appetizers, etc. Maybe the atmosphere and the sake had something to do with it, but it was an incredible dining experience

It was also the single most expensive restaurant meal I have ever eaten in my life.
 

KurtEP

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I've had some American beef raised in the Kobe style. It definitely had a different flavor than I was used to, but I'd put it on par with Jamacian Blue Mountain coffee, kind of mild and lacking in soul, for want of a better term. I'd have a far easier time justifying a $2,000 bottle of wine than a steak for the same price. At least most of the more expensive wines I've tasted have had some character.
 

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