wiring suggestions

Discussion in 'Home Theater Projects' started by Chris Fleming, Jul 14, 2006.

  1. Chris Fleming

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    I've just made some cables using RG-6 and and some crimp on connectors. For the first time in my life, I sprang for the correct tools (connector specific cable stripper, crimper, and ends). The results were very nice. It enabled me to hang a small LCD display on the wall in the kitchen and locate the receiver in a closet. I made in-wall runs for component, stereo, and standard coax connectors with custom wall plates at each end. I also used an infra-red repeater. The results were very nice and work great!

    Anyway, the toughest part was pushing the wall plates onto the drywall ring due to the stiffness of the cable. I'm really new at this type of diy work, so I used "standard" RG-6 cable. Can anyone recommend a "softer", more pliable and flexible type of RG-6? I'm not even sure if such a cable exists, but it would make future projects MUCH easier!

    Thanks in advance for input and advice.
     
  2. Joey Skinner

    Joey Skinner Second Unit

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    Would a right angle connector like this work?
     
  3. Jason Charlton

    Jason Charlton Ambassador

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    RG-6 cable is stiff because it has a solid center conductor. Solid center conductors provide added bandwidth capacity that is important for transmitting HD content. More pliable cables, made from RG-59 and such, have a stranded center conductor that won't carry HD as well, but are much easier to work with. For a small LCD screen in the kitchen, as you describe, you may be OK with a short run of RG-59 if image quality isn't of utmost importance. Keep in mind that if the signal is split too many times upstream, you may have a significantly weaker signal to work with and a thinner cable may not cut it. Good luck with the re-wiring. I'm in the process of doing it throughout my new house and it's nice to see it all come together nice and neatly.

    -Jason
     
  4. Chris Fleming

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    Thanks for the input guys. Joey, that may possibly work if I don't have too many connections to make. I currently did 6 on a single box and plate, so its a bit crowed.

    Signal loss was my concern Jason. So I did the RG-6. I have to say that the picture-quality I'm getting is fantastic, and the completed job looks very nice. I'll probably experiment with 6 connections in a double box and plate next time. That should give me enough room to use the right-angle connectors with no problems.

    Thanks again!
     
  5. Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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    RG-59 has a solid center conductor too, but it’s thinner, as is the overall cable diameter – both of which make it more pliable and easier to route. RG-59 is fine for component video cables – many commercial cable manufacturers use it, even for professional applications (you can find plenty of examples by Googling “rg59 component video cables”).

    However, RG-6 should be used for RF satellite or CATV feeds. That’s where RG-6’s bandwidth capabilities are needed.

    Regards,
    Wayne A. Pflughaupt
     
  6. Grant B

    Grant B Producer

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    One thing to add to Wayne's info. I once accidently used RG-59 between a dish and a satellite reciever. The reciever went into protection mode since it looked like a dead short at that freq.
    Luckily I got it to reset and changed the coax to RG-6. But for normal Audio or Video it should work just fine!
    Grant
     
  7. Chris Fleming

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    Thanks Wayne and Grant. To recap what you've both just explained. If I'm putting the receiver (sat or cable) in a closet, it is okay to use RG-59 to run the component video connections between the receiver and the display. However, the feed from the satellite to the receiver should be RG-6.

    I can deal with that, and the more flexible RG-59 will be much easier to mount my wall plates with.

    Thanks!
     

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