Wireless Network question

Discussion in 'Computers' started by JasonMC, Sep 4, 2003.

  1. JasonMC

    JasonMC Stunt Coordinator

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    I recently added a notebook computer to my home and wanted to do internet sharing and network with my desktop. I purchased a Linksys wireless router and notebook card (B-standard). My house is about 2200 sqft and the router was placed near the center of the house. Once I would take my notebook into my bedroom, I could not access the internet, even though I was connecting to the router at 87%. Also, the router would stop working and required a reset 2-3 times a day.
    Does the "G wireless standard" provide a better range over B? What would be a good "G" router that I can try (maker)?
    Thanks,
    Jason
     
  2. Tim Markley

    Tim Markley Screenwriter

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    It sounds to me like you might have a faulty router. I've got the same Linksys router and haven't had to reset it once since I purchased it almost a year ago. My house is approximately 2400sf with my computer downstairs and I have no problem connecting from anywhere in my house. The Linksys should work fine for you.
     
  3. Tommy G

    Tommy G Screenwriter

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    I agree with Tim. I have approx. the same square footage yet our Linksys router is in our bedroom on the top floor and I work from my notebook in the basement and still get speedy connection. I think you're router is probably defective. Hang in there though, it is well worth it once you get it straightened out.
     
  4. Keith Mickunas

    Keith Mickunas Cinematographer

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    I've heard that some of the cheaper 802.11b routers, like Linksys and D-Link, have a high failure rate. A lot of them probably use the same chipsets which could explain it. So replacing that could eliminate some of your problems.

    I'm not sure if 802.11g has a greater range, although it should give higher speeds at the same ranges as b. Really you only need the minimum connection with b to achieve internet access, because in all likelihood you only get 1-3mbps with most cable/dsl connections. I can't remember specifics, but with b I believe the available connection speeds are 22(with some equipment), 11, 5.5, 2, 1. If the signal is so weak 1mbps can't be achieved, you don't get a connection. As you move farther from the router your speed will drop, and with g you could theoritically double or triple your speed at the same distances.

    I can't recommed specific brands though. It seems kind of hit and miss, some people find certain cards work with certain routers better, not even when they're the same brand, and then sometimes it's a matter of what in your area might interfere with your signal. So buy stuff from someplace with a good return policy and see how it goes in your house.
     
  5. JasonMC

    JasonMC Stunt Coordinator

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    Ok, I just purchased another Linksys router and notebook card (802.11b). I am having the exact same problem. In my bedroom, my router connection stays around 80% but it loses the connection to the internet. Would the linksys booster possibly remedy this? Is there something I can do to improve the output of the router?
    thanks,
    Jason
     
  6. Keith Mickunas

    Keith Mickunas Cinematographer

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    There could be something else interfering with it. I don't understand how you can have a connection but lose the internet access, that doesn't make sense at all.

    Look for a site called Seattle Wireless. They have plans for making antennas, it might be something that would help you. But I'm not certain, your problem just sounds weird.
     
  7. Cees Alons

    Cees Alons Moderator
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    Cees Alons
    The g-standard uses the same frequencies as the b-standard, so in principle has the same range too.

    Your problem sounds weird. If the connection quality stays at about 80% (I assume that's the same SNR that some systems would label "excellent" to "good"), I cannot understand why you would lose Internet connection. It even suggests that your wireless network isn't the main problem at all.

    Do you happen to have a second computer (or notebook) in your home - or can you borrow one? Now you have at least two WAN-cards, you may be able to test the connection between two computers (I assume your Linksys router can do that too).
    If the connection between notebooks stays OK, but you lose Internet control, you have a different situation than when you also lose your connection with the other notebook.
    Also, if one loses internet connection, it may be very interesting to note wether or not the other still has it.

    Cees
     
  8. Thomas Newton

    Thomas Newton Screenwriter

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  9. Dave F

    Dave F Cinematographer

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    I have the somewhat similar issue with my setup. When you guys lose your connection and the router stops working, does it eventually come back? In my situation, the router will begin responding after about 10 to 15 minutes. During that period, all access is disabled. Even my wired computer cannot ping the router.

    I stumbled across this bit of information, but I cannot verify it's accuracy. Basically, he's saying that the UPnP implementation may be causing issues. I've tried disabling it, but my wireless activity has been so low lately that I don't know if it has had an effect. Anyway, here's the relevant quote:
    If anyone else tries it, I'd be interested in hearing your results.

    -Dave
     

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