Windows XP ..how do I...

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by DarrylWHarrisJr, Mar 17, 2002.

  1. DarrylWHarrisJr

    DarrylWHarrisJr Stunt Coordinator

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    Determine what programs I want to show up in another users log-in...for example when my tax deductions (my kids) get on..I only want them to have access to their games and MSPaint, etc. without them destroying my area of the computer as they did with WinME...

    or is this even possible
     
  2. Jon_R

    Jon_R Stunt Coordinator

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    I'm really not sure what file system PCs ship with, but if you go to My computer, and right click on the C drive, and view the Properties, it will tell you the file system. If it is Fat32 you need to convert to NTFS before you can effectively lock out your children from accessing certain things. I'll help you with that, if needed, when you reply.

    If it is fat32, we'll deal with that later. For now, we'll assume it is NTFS. Lets say you have a bunch of music that you don't want your kids to delete (since they probably wouldn't listen to it anyway.) It is very easy to completely 100% lock them out of getting into or accessing that directory. This is all assuming you have NTFS BTW. So, lets say that directory is on your c: drive and its called mp3. You right click on C:mp3 in explorer and go to Sharing and Security. Select the security tab.

    At this point you are going to see a bunch of options and to be quite frank security in the NTFS file system is quite thorough and might require a little extra reading.

    It basically works by a check list of ons and offs. So, if a box is checked allow it will ALLOW them to do that property, such as add or view the directory. Now, using the DENY is sorta strange but a quick and dirty way to disallow all access is to whatever. If you want to make absolutely sure that they can't access it. Just check deny in each box. Don't worry if you accidentally lock yourself out. You are a priveledge account. That means you can do silly things like lock yourself out of a directory, you have the power to give yourself access again.

    You HAVE to have your children under another user name, and preferrably under another use TYPE. You DON'T want your children as ADMINISTRATORS, or POWER USERS. As I said, you'll need to read up on it perhaps.

    The disadvantages. When you do this, its possible that your kids will come in and say, "I can't install this program, it won't let me!" This is perfectly normal, because they are trying to do something (that being access a directory) that they don't have permission to do. I'm not sure how old your kids are, but if they know how to download programs your computer will be a total mess. Don't underestimate kids either, if your kid doesn't, there may be a computer saavy kid who your kid is friends with.

    Lastly, long long ago MS should have migrated the home user towards NT because of its security flexibilty and multiuser usefulness. But thats just my opinion.

    Let us know how it goes.

    Jon
     
  3. DarrylWHarrisJr

    DarrylWHarrisJr Stunt Coordinator

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    how do i convert to NTFS then?........
     
  4. DarrylWHarrisJr

    DarrylWHarrisJr Stunt Coordinator

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    if i convert to ntfs...will all my files (games, wma/mp3's, word documents, etc.) be lost?
     
  5. Thom B

    Thom B Stunt Coordinator

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  6. Jon_R

    Jon_R Stunt Coordinator

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    you really need to run a scandisk on your drive before converting.

    I didn't see anything about what your current file system actually was. I assumed that if a PC shipped w/ XP from the factory that it would have NTFS as the file system.

    Anyway, don't worry about data loss w/ the conversion, its a simple conversion.

    Jon
     
  7. Alan Benson

    Alan Benson Stunt Coordinator

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    XP machines which ship from the big boys tend to be NTFS... Any machine which has migrated from 98/ME/etc will probably still be fat32...

    I was very dissapointed with XP home version's security at first, not realizing that the file system was the real issue... (Under fat32, only the files in your login's document directory tree are/can be protected...)

    Now I'm quite happy; the fat32-to-NTFS conversion is very fast and easy... You lose nothing, and gain full NT-like file and directory security...
     
  8. Jon_R

    Jon_R Stunt Coordinator

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    Alan

    Not to be too picky, but NTFS5 (the version in XP) IS NT and thus you get full NT security.

    On a very basic level, it is very applicable to the home user and should have been added long ago to prevent problems. As shown in this thread.

    Jon
     
  9. Wayne Bundrick

    Wayne Bundrick Cinematographer

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    There is one significant problem with converting FAT32 to NTFS. Both FAT32 and NTFS drives are formatted with a typical cluster size of 4K. But when a FAT32 drive is converted to NTFS, the cluster size becomes 512 bytes. That's inefficient to the point of grotesque. Windows XP installed from scratch on a freshly formatted NTFS drive would be better.

    Fortunately Windows XP setup can format NTFS natively. I remember that Windows NT 4.0 setup would format using FAT and then convert. The workaround was to install NT 4 on a scratch drive, use that to format your real drive as NTFS, then install NT 4 on your real drive. But since Windows 2000, the setup program has been able to format NTFS.
     
  10. Jon_R

    Jon_R Stunt Coordinator

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    Wayne

    Interesting.. 512 bytes. You say that is inefficient, how so? Say you have a 1022 byte file. With 4k clusters it will take up 4000 bytes, but w/ 512 byte clusters it will take up 1k, thus a savings of 3k with the expense of 8 times more clusters.

    I don't doubt this but I would like to see a url about it.

    Anyone?
     
  11. Todd Hochard

    Todd Hochard Cinematographer

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  12. Kevin P

    Kevin P Screenwriter

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  13. DarrylWHarrisJr

    DarrylWHarrisJr Stunt Coordinator

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    thx guys...painless transfer........to ntfs..there's even an option when you right click the c drive to "format" the drive and completely redo the whole drive..erasing everything...i guess it's like nuking when the systems starts to slow down like win98se
     
  14. Curtis Koenig

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    You can specify a default user profile such that when a new user is created the desktop, start menu, and icon sets are what you want them to be.
     

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