Will the top of my RPTV sag over time?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Dave Poehlman, Feb 14, 2003.

  1. Dave Poehlman

    Dave Poehlman Producer

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    The reason I ask is, I have my components stacked on top of my set. This was to be a temporary setup, but it may be quite a while before I find another home for 'em. Currently up there are: cable box, vcr, DVD player, reciever, CD recorder. I have them sitting as far out to the sides of my set as possible.

    It looks to me that the outer cabinet on my Toshi 50HDX82 is enameled MDF of some sort. I don't know what kind of construction is on the inside.

    Is there any chance of my set "sagging"?
     
  2. Patrick Sun

    Patrick Sun Moderator
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    Of course there is. Try to evenly distribute the weight (even if it means you have an imbalance of gear on one side).

    It could be time to make a rack to house the TV and gear.
     
  3. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

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    Is all this in addition to a center-channel speaker?

    Even if the RPTV can support all that weight, I'm not cool with positioning those components on top of the set. I try to separate electronics as far as I can from the display in order to minimize stray electromagnetic fields.

    Can't you find a cheap equipment stand or rack as an interim solution?
     
  4. Kwang Suh

    Kwang Suh Supporting Actor

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    Depending on the size of your RPTV, putting components on top of the TV can be further away from the electronics than putting the components beside the TV. RPTVs have nothing but a mirror, air, plastic housing and the plasic screen in their upper half.
     
  5. Kevin. W

    Kevin. W Screenwriter

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    Get your hands on a couple of milk crates if you can and stack your stuff to the side. I got my centre channel of the top of my set.

    Kevin
     
  6. David Von Pein

    David Von Pein Producer

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    My Toshiba has a VERY sturdy (non-bending) top shelf.

    I, too, was a bit worried at first about putting equipment on top. But when I saw how very sturdy it was, I didn't hesitate at all.

    There's no way this Toshiba TV top is going to "bend". (At least I hope not, for Pete's Sake! It's 0.75-inch thick!) [​IMG][​IMG]
     
  7. JackS

    JackS Supporting Actor

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    I had a very large and heavy center speaker balanced on top of my new RP and the thing that convinced me to remove it was the weight. When the set was off, I noticed the strange distortions mirrored back by the highly reflective protective screen. This was proof enough for me that a change had to be made. I removed the center and the reflective distortions returned to normal.
     
  8. John McCutcheon

    John McCutcheon Auditioning

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    Take a four foot wide piece of MDF, support it at both ends with NOTHING on it. Within a couple of days it will sag. I'm a cabinet maker and I've used a lots MDF (mostly 3/4"), the stuff is very heavy and with spans this wide, won't support its OWN weight without sagging. I'm sure that the top of these TVs is reinforced to stiffen it against sagging under their own weight, but I sure wouldn't load them up with components. That's just asking for trouble. Maybe a better short term solution would be to go to the lumber yard and get a couple of 2x6's or 2x8's. Cut them a bit longer than the width of your TV, lay them across the top of your TV, supported at the ends with smaller 2x blocks. At least if these start to sag after awhile, you can just flip them over (very difficult to do with the top of your TV [​IMG]).
     
  9. Jan Strnad

    Jan Strnad Screenwriter

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    I agree with John. MDF just can't compete with real wood.

    You're asking for trouble with components on top of the TV. I'd do whatever was necessary to get them off to the side.

    Jan
     
  10. Dave Poehlman

    Dave Poehlman Producer

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    Thanks for all the input everyone.... I think I'll be shopping for some shelving this week.
     

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