will i electrocute myself?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Jason Wilcox, Jul 10, 2002.

  1. Jason Wilcox

    Jason Wilcox Supporting Actor

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    ok so I've got this old marantz 2235B stereo receiver and a few of the buttons are very finicky. if the unit is not plugged into an outlet and i attempt to clean the buttons from the inside i still have the risk of electrocuting myself right? feel free to chime in...don't worry....i won't hold any of you liable for my demise
     
  2. Kenny Booth

    Kenny Booth Stunt Coordinator

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    Go for it, just leave the TV alone
     
  3. Jason Wilcox

    Jason Wilcox Supporting Actor

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    haha my dad once electrocuted himself while we were trying to figure out why a TV wasn't working....i think i'll jump in the receiver once i get a few more replies
     
  4. Ted Kim

    Ted Kim Stunt Coordinator

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    First check that the unit is unplugged, then get a piece of wire, use insulated pliers or the like, connect one end of the wire to ground, and then use the other end of the wire to discharge all the capacitors to ground. Then there would be no chance of getting shocked.

    If the unit has been unplugged for a long time, then all the capacitors should be discharged.
     
  5. Jason Wilcox

    Jason Wilcox Supporting Actor

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    by ground do you mean the ground in an outlet?
     
  6. Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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    Nice receiver you have there, Jason.

     
  7. Bob-N

    Bob-N Supporting Actor

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    How long has the unit been unplugged? As a previous poster mentioned, if it's been unplugged for a day or so, the excess energy from the filter caps has been dissapated already.

    If you aren't sure, then the ground source noted is from the ground from the wall outlet.

    Anyhow, I've been shocked before by caps and it's not that bad. I've been shocked by 240V in working on plugged in products (it's my job) and I'm still around to talk about it.
     
  8. Jason Wilcox

    Jason Wilcox Supporting Actor

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    i see no easy way to apply the tuner cleaner without detaching several other components inside the receive so i think i'll just stop for now. i can get the buttons set how i like them if i fidget with them.

    on the plus side i fixed the scratchy tuning dial by removing a small piece of cardboard that was pushed up against it because its glue had worn out.

    thanks a lot guys!
     
  9. Jason Wilcox

    Jason Wilcox Supporting Actor

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    edit....
     
  10. ben hunt

    ben hunt Stunt Coordinator

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    Jason, if your dad was prone to electrocuting himself I would also stay away from the insides of electronic devices.
     
  11. Joseph_W

    Joseph_W Stunt Coordinator

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    Jason,
    Electrocute = no pulse! Shocked is a better word.

    TV's have high voltage stages. TV capacitors can have a pretty high voltage stored on them.

    Receivers have lots and lots of capacitance, but no high voltage. Still not a bad idea to wait for awhile before you open.

    Biggest risk of getting shocked or electricuted is re-assembling the unit incorrectly. If you are worried about this, don't open the unit!

    By Bob's admission of getting hit by 240V, don't assume that's not enough voltage to get hurt. More people are killed each year at 120V than any other voltage (I've been told). It's all about current flow and resistance to ground. Bob was probably not barefoot standing on a grounded metal plate when he was hit by 240V!

    Joe
     
  12. Kevin P

    Kevin P Screenwriter

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    Actually it's current, not voltage that's dangerous. 40,000 volts at a few millionths of an ampere will jolt you but not hurt you (static electricity from touching a doorknob is a classic example of this). 120 volts at half an amp can kill you. Of course the voltage has to be high enough to push a sufficient amount of current through your body, therefore a car battery at 12 volts, despite its ability to produce hundreds of amps can't shock you.

    Receivers run at fairly low voltages, so the risk of shock is minimal provided it's unplugged. A bigger risk with charged caps in receivers is if you accidentally short one, which could fry something or burn you.

    TVs on the other hand carry very high voltages, and the CRT and caps can hold thousands of volts even after it's shut off and unplugged. I'd avoid poking around inside a TV unless you know what you're doing. Smart TV techs always discharge the CRT(s) before messing around in there.

    KJP
     
  13. Bob-N

    Bob-N Supporting Actor

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    Joesph,

    Yes, you are correct. It is enough damage to be careful with and I do make sure that my hands are dry and that I am as isolated from the ground as possible whenever I'm working inside a live unit. In 15 years of doing this work, I think I've only shocked myself twice and it was stupid stuff like not paying attention to where my other hand was within the live circuit.

    I didn't mean to trivialize the hazard but I guess I may have since I do work on live circuits constantly. By all means, make sure that if you decide to work internally on equipment, unplug the unit before you open it. If at all possible, don't even open up the unit. Note that you will also probably void the remaining warranty if you open it up.

    Bob
     
  14. Jason Wilcox

    Jason Wilcox Supporting Actor

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    haha, unless its a 20+ year warranty i don't think i'll void anything.
     

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