Will an S-Video to RCA cable reduce dot crawl?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Nicole P, Sep 2, 2001.

  1. Nicole P

    Nicole P Stunt Coordinator

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    Hello,
    I have a lower end tv which only has RCA video-in.
    Not yet ready to upgrade the tv and am looking for an interim remedy for dot crawl.
    I have seen cables advertised that are S-Video to RCA and still preserve the colour.
    Will such a cable give me a better image and reduce dot crawl?
    Many thanks for your help,
    Nicole P
     
  2. Inspector Hammer!

    Inspector Hammer! Executive Producer

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    Nicole, welcome to the Home Theater Forum!
    If I understand your post, your talking about a cable that has an s-video plug on one end, and RCA plugs on the other end? I've never heard of a cable of this type, but they may be something new, but the logic in such a cable doesn't hold up, because even though you have the s-video end connected to your player and the RCA end connected to your monitor, the end result is still the same, the signal is still reaching your monitor as composite, so I don't see how this will help the picture any.
    My advice would be to purchase a good set of RCA interconnects like 'Monster' and use those until your ready to upgrade your monitor.
    Again, welcome to the forum! [​IMG]
    ------------------
    So madly in love with Estella Warren!
    [Edited last by John Williamson on September 02, 2001 at 05:56 AM]
     
  3. Bon

    Bon Auditioning

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    Nicole,
    I think that what John says is correct- your idea still involves inputting a composite signal into your TV, so I think you'd be better off simply using composite to start with.
    Although I don't see how an expensive video cable would reduce dot crawl... I'm not trying to start one of those "expensive cables do/don't make a difference" arguments, but TMK dot crawl is simply an inherent feature of composite signals, and not related to the type of cable used.
    -Bon
     
  4. Kimmo Jaskari

    Kimmo Jaskari Screenwriter

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    Also, if your TV has a sharpness control, turn that all the way down. That will add noise to the picture and make things like dot crawl really stand out.
    ------------------
    /Kimmo
     
  5. Dustin B

    Dustin B Producer

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    Dot crawl is an artifact of a comb filter. If a composite cable is going into the TV then the chroma (color) and luminance (brightness) signals are combined and must be seperated. This is done by a combfilter of which there are many different types. If you have a cheap 27" TV then you will have a cheap comb filter and nothing you do will get ride of the artifacts it creates. Even the best combfilters in the most expensive TV's can't do a perfect job (well they can on still images but not when the image starts to move).
    I was pretty clueless about comb filters until I read this artical:
    http://www.cybertheater.com/Tech_Rep...b_filters.html
    Little long, but still a great read.
     
  6. Nicole P

    Nicole P Stunt Coordinator

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    Thank you all for your help!
    I calibrated my set with Video Essentials a few months ago and am trying to squeeze the best image I can out of it before admitting that I need to upgrade [​IMG]
    Just out of interest, here is the site that advertises the S-Video to RCA cable - http://www.svideo.com/svideorca.html
    I was wondering how the physics of it would work but, as you say, it still will be a composite signal.
    Ah well, time to start saving...
    Thanks again,
    Nicole P
     
  7. donovan_chin

    donovan_chin Stunt Coordinator

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    I disagree with most of the replies to this post because I have done a direct A/B between the composite signal directly from the DVD player and a converted S-video signal to composite with the use of a converter made my Dayton Electronics. I see a really significant difference between the composite signal to s-video. The cables I'm using are Acoustic Research Pro Series Composite cable and the S-video cable is just a regular s-video cable made by RCA (not gold series). If you are not looking to spend a lot of money to upgrade your TV to one that has s-video or component inputs, this is an cheap upgrade that you can see right off the bat. And it costs less than 10 bucks. Go to partsexpress.com to get the converter.
     
  8. JasonKrol

    JasonKrol Supporting Actor

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    i hate to branch this post, but can someone please explain which is better S-video or RCA. and...can I have some components going into my receiver via rca and svideo but have the main video out from the receiver to tv be svideo?
    i would like to use svideo all around, but I cant in certain circumstances, (ie cable box and vcr).
    thanks for any information!
    ------------------
    - Jason
    My DVD Collection
     
  9. Fred Seger

    Fred Seger Stunt Coordinator

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    From what receiver I've seen. If you put in an s-video signal, only an s-video signal will be sent out. The reciever does no conversion. But with a few s-video from parts-express, which I have used and like a lot, it's not problem to switch all of your devices( cable box's, vcr etc) to s-video.
     
  10. Allan Jayne

    Allan Jayne Cinematographer

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    If your TV has a lot of dot crawl, for example when viewing broadcasts, and if you have no input other than a regular yellow video in jack (composite), no cable will improve it.
    Check the instructions or menus for a setting labeled "notch", that may reduce dot crawl but also makes the overall picture a bit softer. This setting is meant for shows with a lot of thin graphics and text, such as the Weather Channel.
    You will just have to wait until your budget or spouse (or TV failure) allows you to go buy a new TV.
    Other video hints: http://members.aol.com/ajaynejr/video.htm
    [Edited last by Allan Jayne on September 04, 2001 at 11:59 AM]
     

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