Will an RV damage an asphalt driveway?

Discussion in 'After Hours Lounge (Off Topic)' started by DaveF, Jul 2, 2006.

  1. DaveF

    DaveF Moderator
    Moderator

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2001
    Messages:
    17,986
    Likes Received:
    1,545
    Location:
    One Loudoun, Ashburn, VA
    Real Name:
    David Fischer
    (edit: posting error ate the starter message.)

    To make a long story short: moving my wife into my house, my grandad drove his RV onto a neighbors 3-week old asphalt driveway. My neighbor is angry, believing we damaged his driveway. (Depressions and loosening of the material)

    I'm going to make this right. But I'd figure a properly installed asphalt driveway would not be harmed by an RV -- and his contractor would repair any damage then under warranty.

    Am I off base?
     
  2. Dheiner

    Dheiner Gazoo

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2001
    Messages:
    2,808
    Likes Received:
    147
    Location:
    'skonsen
    Real Name:
    John Dhein
  3. DaveF

    DaveF Moderator
    Moderator

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2001
    Messages:
    17,986
    Likes Received:
    1,545
    Location:
    One Loudoun, Ashburn, VA
    Real Name:
    David Fischer
    John,
    Thanks for the link. The driveway has cured for a two or three weeks. But it was a warm day (and there's suggestions it was not installed properly) so maybe the RV depressed or loosened some areas.
     
  4. Todd Hochard

    Todd Hochard Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 1999
    Messages:
    2,312
    Likes Received:
    0
    You haven't bothered to walk over and actually see if there's any damage? That seems odd.
     
  5. Philip Hamm

    Philip Hamm Lead Actor

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 1999
    Messages:
    6,873
    Likes Received:
    2
    Yes. Most home asphalt driveways aren't built strong enough to hold parked cars over long periods, much less an RV. That's why garages have concrete. We have asphalt alleys in our neighborhood, and they're not strong enough to handle trash trucks, the trash people have to drive pickups up the alleys to collect trash. Unless the driveway was specifically designed for heavy vehicles, it's a safe assumption that a heavy vehicle would cause damage, parcicularly if it's just a few weeks old, especially on a hot day.

    You should see the job a motorcycle kickstand does on realtively fresh hot asphalt.
     
  6. DaveF

    DaveF Moderator
    Moderator

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2001
    Messages:
    17,986
    Likes Received:
    1,545
    Location:
    One Loudoun, Ashburn, VA
    Real Name:
    David Fischer
    Yesterday was crazy, and in the midst of everything, I didn't comprehend what the alleged damage was.

    I just spoke with my neighbor and he described the problems, which now make sense: the asphalt was loosened in the spots where the RV wheels were turned. It's now more crumbly in those areas.

    I've asked my neighbor to contact the contractor who did the work and ask him to look at it -- maybe this is a warranty issue. My grandad will contact his auto insurance after the holiday, and (hopefully) they'll send an appraisor to inspect it.

    If those two things don't work, I'll figure it out. My thought now is that, if anything, it needs additional sealing in the affected regions. And that won't be more than a couple hundred dollars.
     
  7. Steve Berger

    Steve Berger Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2001
    Messages:
    972
    Likes Received:
    3
    We used to live within sight of a grocery store and they had to pour 4x8 concrete pads where the delivery trucks parked after the wheels of a Semi sank through the asphalt and bottomed out.
     
  8. Brian Perry

    Brian Perry Cinematographer

    Joined:
    May 6, 1999
    Messages:
    2,807
    Likes Received:
    0
    It's possible you (or your insurance company) may be on the hook for re-doing the whole driveway...I'm not sure if you can "patch" asphalt and make it look as uniform as it was prior to the damage.

    However, if it was my new driveway, I would have had a rope or other barricade preventing any unauthorized vehicles from entering until it was cured. In that respect, the neighbor should take some of the responsibility. After all, if a UPS truck drove up and caused similar damage, I doubt UPS would foot the whole bill for a new driveway.
     
  9. Alex-C

    Alex-C Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2000
    Messages:
    1,238
    Likes Received:
    0
    Generally speaking, any paved surface that will support large heavy vehicles (i.e. buses, semis, etc.) should be concrete, not pavement.

    That is why in paved parking lots, the area in front of a trash enclosure will be concrete and the areas behind the buildings (where the delivery semis would arrive and make all their turning movements) would also be concrete.
     
  10. DaveF

    DaveF Moderator
    Moderator

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2001
    Messages:
    17,986
    Likes Received:
    1,545
    Location:
    One Loudoun, Ashburn, VA
    Real Name:
    David Fischer
    Perhaps that's part of my confusion: while large, I think of an RV as a "residential" vehicle. The sort of thing that is driven on normal driveways.

    I'll soon learn what (if anything) must be done for a post-RV-driven driveway.
     
  11. LewB

    LewB Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2002
    Messages:
    1,282
    Likes Received:
    0
    My .02 ...
    My 15 year old driveway has some lovely ruts put in it recently by the garbage truck. That's why I put a piece of plywood under the jack when I jack up my car on the driveway.
    As for the insurance company, depending on the cost of the driveway repair, you may just want to eat it and leave them out of it.
     
  12. Brett_B

    Brett_B Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 1999
    Messages:
    804
    Likes Received:
    39

    Dave,

    I am quite puzzled at your "reaction" to this situation, which leads me to ask this question. Did you get prior approval from your neighbor to park the RV in his driveway?
     
  13. brentl

    brentl Cinematographer

    Joined:
    May 7, 1999
    Messages:
    2,921
    Likes Received:
    1
    "and his contractor would repair any damage then under warranty."

    This quote also puzzles me. Why, if your vehicle damaged the driveway, would his warranty cover your damage?

    I think this is clearly on your head to repair his driveway.

    Brent
     
  14. SethH

    SethH Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2003
    Messages:
    2,867
    Likes Received:
    0
    I tend to agree that you are responsible for whatever costs may be incurred. However, I find th question posed earlier about UPS interesting. If a UPS or FedEx truck had done the exact same thing who would be liable?
     
  15. Justin Lane

    Justin Lane Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2000
    Messages:
    2,149
    Likes Received:
    0

    I second those thoughts Brent. (Dave also mentioned that he thought the asphalt may be installed incorrectly....how would a non-asphalt installer have any clue on proper installation?).

    Bottom line is an action by Dave's family member caused damage. Involving your grandad's insurance also puzzles me as he was helping out your wife and someone obvously told him to park in your neighbor's driveway! Buck up an pay the repair costs.

    J
     
  16. mark alan

    mark alan Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2002
    Messages:
    620
    Likes Received:
    0
    Unless you had approval to pull the RV in, it is a cut and dried trespass on your part and you are responsible for the damages. Better get ready to put in a new driveway.

    Nothing like making friends with the neighbors.
     
  17. Jeff Ulmer

    Jeff Ulmer Producer

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 1998
    Messages:
    5,584
    Likes Received:
    0
    That depends on whether the vehicle was parked on the property or on the easement, which is public. In general though, if you or your family damages a neighbor's property it is up to you to fix it to the same condition it was prior to the damage.
     
  18. Philip Hamm

    Philip Hamm Lead Actor

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 1999
    Messages:
    6,873
    Likes Received:
    2
    Unless they were delivering cinder blocks, there's no way a delivery truck would have a fraction of the weight on a small tire area that an RV has.
     
  19. DaveF

    DaveF Moderator
    Moderator

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2001
    Messages:
    17,986
    Likes Received:
    1,545
    Location:
    One Loudoun, Ashburn, VA
    Real Name:
    David Fischer
    This wasn't parking, it was a turn-around maneuver to back into my yard, for unloading.

    My error, if any, was in believing that thinking an RV was a "normal" vehicle and that residential driveways were built for such loads. Thinking that, I thought that any damage would be from installation error, not from overloading.

    The comment on poor installation comes from a neighbor who saw the work. She said it was done atypically without the normal diligence to compacting and stabilizing the sub-asphalt base of the driveway.

    As for rectifying any damage: I'm pursuing it. I've talked to my neighbor, and am working on identifying any damage and how to repair it, without cost to the neighbor.
     
  20. Scott Dautel

    Scott Dautel Second Unit

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 1998
    Messages:
    471
    Likes Received:
    0
    Unfortunately ... I have lots of experience here. My driveway is 100' long asphalt. It has been destroyed by trucks twice.

    Typical asphalt driveways are 3" - 4" thick. They should be 4" minimum, but depending on the contractor, don't count on it. It is also common for new house construction to have some fill under the driveway area. This softer fill will compress for years, making for an unstable base under the asphalt.

    Most cars weigh 2000 - 4000 lbs with the wt distributed on 4 tires. My Chrysler Pacifica is 4500 lbs and has left depressions in my most recent asphalt driveway ... they worsen in the summer when asphalt is hotter and softer. Dump trucks and other delivery vehicles can weigh up to 40,000 lbs. Even with 10 tires, that is 4000 lb per tire concentrated in a small spot.

    Asphalt roads have 6" of rock below and at least 6" of asphalt. The standards for road construction are much stronger than that of driveways. In my case, a tear up & replacement driveway will cost me ~$3,500. I just had a quote to upgrade to the equivalent of road construction standards and it was $5000 - $6000.

    Bottom line ... it's quite likely that a big RV could damage a new asphalt driveway. Be careful on what you promise ... you could be committing thousands of dollars.
     

Share This Page