Will 100% contrast damage TV?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Matthew_F, Dec 2, 2002.

  1. Matthew_F

    Matthew_F Stunt Coordinator

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    Hi,

    On the RPTV, would running 100% damage a TV (burn in)? If so.. how long? I gotten my new Hitachi TWX set recently and have been running for a couple of hours total(over a peroid of a few days). I noticed that my TV was set to 100% contrast but just yesturday changed it to 50%. I want to make sure my set is safe.

    Thanks
     
  2. Bill Lucas

    Bill Lucas Supporting Actor

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    Yes it will. You should be fine as long as you haven't been watching MSNBC or CNN or something else with a bright permanent logo for the entire time.
     
  3. Eric Stuckey

    Eric Stuckey Second Unit

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    Try around 20% if you need to raise the brightness ,but not to high.
     
  4. Matthew_F

    Matthew_F Stunt Coordinator

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    Hi Bill,

    Nope, I didn't have still stuff running the entire time. I guess it would add up to a couple of minutes of still stuff ever since I gotten the TV.

    --

    Hi Eric,

    I tried 20% but it just seemed way too low. 50% seemed to make out very well and the brightness is also 50% default. Using the AVIA kit, I noticed nothing needed to be adjust except for the contrast which was at 100% default.
     
  5. Allan Jayne

    Allan Jayne Cinematographer

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    I suggest no more than a third of maximum contrast for an RPTV.
    When you set contrast using AVIA or Video Essentials, after obtaining the contrast the tests suggest, reduce contrast more by a significant amount.
    I believe that five minutes with very bright stationary matter and very high contrast is enough to cause noticeable damage.
    Video hints:
    http://members.aol.com/ajaynejr/video.htm
     
  6. Jeremy Anderson

    Jeremy Anderson Screenwriter

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    The contrast test pattern on Avia is designed to set the MAXIMUM safe white level. As they explain, this means the level where A) details aren't washed out due to blurring of white and B) the vertical lines on both sides aren't bending due to overtaxing of the television's power supply. But again, this is the MAXIMUM safe level, NOT the optimal level.

    Ideally, here's what you want with the contrast pattern on Avia and an RPTV: You want to turn the contrast down to the lowest point possible that the white portion looks white and not gray. You're setting the white level so that the pattern is showing the brightest shade of white. Then, check brightness (aka black level), since lowering the contrast will affect the brightness control. Then, you do the color/tint to match up with this white level (since white is being compared with blue through a blue filter to determine proper color saturation as compared to white).

    Running contrast any higher also causes you to raise the color control (since color saturation is set comparatively to the white level), can shorten the life of the RPTV, and creates a greater risk of burn-in. Another problem with running contrast too high on an RPTV is internal reflections inside the set itself, which cause a kind of halo effect around white objects against black backgrounds. Proper contrast adjustment can greatly minimize halos from in-cabinet reflections. Besides that, you'll be amazed by the difference in shadow detail and color once you really dial it in.

    As Leon Phelps, the Ladies Man, would say... "I hope whatever I just said helped."
     

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