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Widescreen v. 4:3 Viewing

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Ron Chusid, May 27, 2001.

  1. Ron Chusid

    Ron Chusid Auditioning

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    I've been debating getting a widescreen v. 4:3 HD TV. (I'm looking at tubes due to the amount of light in the room).
    Widescreen looks better for DVD's and for future use, while 4:3 is better for current TV viewing--I can get a bigger 4:3 picture on a 36" TV than on the widescreen tube TV's available. How do people who bought either type of HD TV feel about their decision? Do buyers of widescreen TV's use stretch features for 4:3 pictures, or put up with the bars on the side?
    One possible issue which can affect this is the amount of widescreen material either now available or to be available in the near future. Obviously DVD (and a handful of my videotapes) take advantage of widescreen. (Unfortunately my video tape collection is still much bigger than my DVD collection). How about satellite--I hear there is some HD material available. Is there very much? Is it just movies or is there more available? Is the HD material actually in widescreen? With ER now in widescreen, any word if other shows plan to do this? Does ER display well on a widescreen TV?
     
  2. Steve Tannehill

    Steve Tannehill Ambassador

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    High Definition, by definition, is broadcast in 16x9 widescreen. Programming is still a little thin. Much of CBS primetime is HD, as is Jay Leno on NBC, and the occasional movie on ABC. Dish Network has HBO-HD and Showtime-HD, a PPV channel, and a full-time demo channel. HBO does not always show movies in OAR, and neither HBO nor Showtime show everything yet in HD.
    E.R. is widescreen, but not HD yet.
    I vary between windowboxing and expanding 4x3 images on my Mits 16x9 widescreen.
    I think 16x9 is the shape of the future, which is why I have been a widescreen TV owner for the last few years.
    - Steve
     
  3. Ron Chusid

    Ron Chusid Auditioning

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    How do widescreen shows like ER work on widescreen TV's? I assume you zoom and cut off the top and bottom--does it fit well on the screen doing this?
    How do 4:3 images look stretched on a widescreen--do they look very distorted, or is it comfortable to watch in this manner?
     

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