Widescreen Formats?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Bill Lide, Aug 5, 2002.

  1. Bill Lide

    Bill Lide Extra

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    2 Questions
    1. I have just bought a new SONY 57' 16:9 TV and a sony progressive scan DVD player. I watched a movie on it and it still has the black bars at the top and bottom. I can zoom to make it bigger but there are still some smaller black bars. Is there more than one format of wide screen or the black bars just always there.
    2 What kind of cabling do you guys recommend I get for the progressive scan, right now im using just standard RCA?[​IMG]
     
  2. John Royster

    John Royster Screenwriter

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    Welcome to the forum Bill.

    I believe your questions on aspect ratios and a whole lot more are answered in the "Home Theater Basics" section, check out the very first post. It is locked there and provides a wealth of info.

    Now for your questions. Movies DO indeed have different aspect ratios (width:height). A 16x9 tv works out to be 1.78 aspect ratio.

    Many films are 1.85 (fill your screen), others 2.35 and even 2.40. The 2.35 and 2.40 are much wider and will have black bars on your 16x9 TV. You can usually find the aspect ration on the back of the DVD.

    Cables? AR makes good cables for not too much money. You'll need a component set that has three cables - that carries your video.

    Also make sure your DVD player is setup for 16x9.

    Good luck!
     
  3. Craig S

    Craig S Producer

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    Re: the black bar issue, there's some ongoing discussion in this thread:
    http://www.hometheaterforum.com/htfo...threadid=86227
    Basically, your new set has an aspect ratio of 1.78:1. Most films are either 1.85:1 or 2.35:1. The former will show no black bars on your set (due either to overscan or in some cases the film being mildly cropped to 1.78:1 on the DVD). However, 2.35:1 films will show black bars, simply because they're significantly wider that 1.78:1 and that's the only way to show the entire picture on the screen.
    Another thing - make sure your DVD player is set to "16:9 widescreen mode", to match your set.
     
  4. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

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    Yes, Bill, is a world of diverse aspect ratios, you will always have black bars. Imagine a truly widescreen movie--Ben-Hur, which pushes 2.60:1--on a 16:9 set. You will really notice the black bars then.
    I'm thinking of doing a basic, primer-style post about this subject to leave permanently bumped at the top of this section. The question pops up often.
    Welcome to HTF, by the way! [​IMG]
     
  5. Bill Lide

    Bill Lide Extra

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    Thanks for the replys!! So If the movie are in the 2 ratios it will have the black bars and if its 1.85 it should fill up the whole screen...correct? Plus, how do I know if my picture is "fine tuned" I see lots of people posting about color testing and making the picture quality better? Oh yeah, I picked up some quality Phoenix Gold cables at lunch time and will use them for the progressive scan. So maybe that will make a difference also.

    Its so crazy learning about HT, I used to be really into car audio and new it in and out. This HT stuff makes me such a newb, I appreciate all the help and maybe I can pass it on to someone else.

    Thanks
     
  6. John Royster

    John Royster Screenwriter

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    Bill, here's the direct link the HTF primer. TONS of good information in there. I'd suggest you read the whole thing as it will immediately get you up to speed on the basics.
    http://www.hometheaterforum.com/htfo...threadid=55635
    There are calibration DVDs that have video test patterns you can use to get the most out of your new toy. Avia is a popular one as is Video Essentials
     
  7. Bill Lide

    Bill Lide Extra

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    Thanks for the help guys. I have notice that this forum it very informative and everyone seems to be very helpful. It is very kind of everyone to share their knowledge and help others the way you guys do. So keep up the good work!

    Thanks
     
  8. Steve Schaffer

    Steve Schaffer Producer

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    Bill,
    I've had the Sony KP57HW40 since last October and couldn't be happier with it.

    This set is easy to calibrate with AVIA, and has a few useful features in the service menu that can help you get an even better picture, if you want to go beyond the user-adjustments with AVIA.
     
  9. Bill Lide

    Bill Lide Extra

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    I tried everything last night and it made all the difference in the world. My DVD was set to 4:3 and the cables I had were some old RCA from 2 yrs ago (Playstation).
    I put the the DVD player on 16:9 and the picture is huge and looks great. I do have one question though, when I bought the RCA cable (Pheonix Gold) the sales man told me it works with Progressive scan. But I noticed it looks like the video cable is alot thicker than the other 2 cables. So, I presume its a Video and 2 Audio cables. Is this ok to use or should I find some different cables?
     
  10. Binh Vu

    Binh Vu Stunt Coordinator

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    Bill, I think you got a wrong cable!!! Component cable included 3 different cables colored blue, green and red and they should be all the same (not one thicker than others)
     
  11. Steve Schaffer

    Steve Schaffer Producer

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    Bill,
    It sounds like you got standard AV cables, not component video cables.

    The ends of Component video cables are color coded Red, Blue, and Green, and the cables themselves are all the same thickness.

    If your thinner cables are color coded red and white, and the thicker one is yellow, you've got AV cables for analog left and right audio (the thin red and white coded cables) and composite video (the thicker yellow coded cable).

    I've seen AV cables like yours used as component video cables in electronics stores that don't know any better, and you do get a picture, but they aren't realy designed to carry enough bandwidth for progressive scan dvd.

    Look for cables packaged and labelled as being Component Video Cables, with the red, blue, and green color coding on the connectors.
     

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