Wideband vs. Standard Component Video Inputs

Discussion in 'Home Theater Projects' started by SeanA, Sep 20, 2003.

  1. SeanA

    SeanA Second Unit

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    I did not realize until just recently that there are two types of component video inputs. What is the difference? (Can you not get HD signals through "standard" inputs)? And how do you know what you have? I have a 34" Sony XBR, and nothing in the manual tells me whether the component video inputs are "wideband" or "standard", though it does indicate that the inputs are compatible with 480i, 480p, 720p, & 1080i.
     
  2. Chuck Kent

    Chuck Kent Supporting Actor

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    Here is a good link about bandwidth...
    http://hometown.aol.com/ajaynejr/bandwid.htm

    If your TV can handle true 720p (with no down conversion), then it would have to be "wideband", meaning that it is HDTV ready.

    There are component inputs on TVs that are not HDTV ready and these inputs are really only good for signals up to 480i for DVD players (or HD downconverted to 480i (which is no longer HD.)) These component inputs would be the "standard" type you mention.
     
  3. SeanA

    SeanA Second Unit

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    Thanks Chuck !!!

    My TV converts 720p to 1080i, so would that also mean the component video inputs have to be wideband ?
     
  4. Chuck Kent

    Chuck Kent Supporting Actor

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    Well, based on my understanding, even if your display doesn't show 720p natively, if it accepts a true 720p image and converts it (to 1080i in this case), then the inputs would have to be wideband. Right?
     
  5. Allan Jayne

    Allan Jayne Cinematographer

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    If the A/V receiver or TV video inputs' bandwidth is not wide enough, you will still get a full picture but it might not be as sharp and the side edges of subject material may have ghosting or an unnatural sheen. (loss of horizontal resolution and/or left to right transient response problems)

    Even when incoming 720p is displayed as 1080i, the first part of the circuitry, that accepts the 720p, needs excellent bandwidth so as not to degrade the picture.

    On a few TV sets, separate sets of component input jacks may be used for HDTV versus regular component video, and the HDTV jacks may be labeled "high bandwidth". The regular circuitry might not handle the HDTV scan rates at all and the HDTV circuitry might not handle regular scan rates.
     

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