Why you shouldn't have posters or reflective surfaces in an HT...

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Jay Mitchosky, Jul 18, 2001.

  1. Jay Mitchosky

    Jay Mitchosky Producer

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    http://homepage.mac.com/ccrim/home-t.../fakeview.html
    I've never understood why people opt to design dedicated theaters with glass/reflective surfaces in the immediate vicinity of the screen. The scenario played out in the theater above (which is otherwise quite nice) would drive me nuts.
    My philosophy is this: build a theater with its purpose in mind, when the lights are off and you're immersed in the movie.
    ------------------
    --Jay
    "No one can hear when you're screaming in digital."
    My Home Theatre Pictures...
    "You're no mesiah. You're, you're a movie of the week. You're a ... t-shirt, at best."
     
  2. Keith M.

    Keith M. Second Unit

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    I was wondering about this myself...
    There has to be non-reflective material that can be used to frame movie posters...
    Anyone have any suggestions???
     
  3. Jens Raethel

    Jens Raethel Second Unit

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    I think its a bit sad that this guy (with that nice setup)
    literally destroy the movie experience he gets!
    I couldn't bare the interference with those posters acting as almost a "screen" itself!
    ------------------
    Go see my new theater CINEMAX! updated 2001-07-10
    Then give me your thoughts!!
    http://cine-max.tripod.com/cinemax/
     
  4. James D S

    James D S Screenwriter

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    Jay, those aren't posters, they are plasma screens! Don't worry though, it was an easy mistake to make. [​IMG]
    [Edited last by James D S on July 18, 2001 at 02:44 PM]
     
  5. MickeS

    MickeS Producer

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    I agree with you. I have seen a lot of pictures of really nice setups, that have movie posters framed near the screen. I don't get it. But maybe it looks worse on picture than it does in real life.
    And don't get me started on all those "unique" accessories like popcorn cart and reel-table... [​IMG]
    /Mike
    PS. Of course it's all jealousy on my part, since I don't have anything that can even come sloe to these setups. DS.
     
  6. Ron-P

    Ron-P Producer

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    That would sure make it hard to focus on just 1 movie in the room [​IMG]
    At least he sould make some black felt covers to hang up over the posters.
    I am in the process of adding posters to my walls. But I also have pieces of felt attached to a length of wood. Set the wood ontop of the posters frame and the felt drapes down over the poster. Works like a charm. yet the posters add a nice touch to the room during non-show times.
    Peace Out~ [​IMG]
    ------------------
    The Green Room | Rons DVDs
     
  7. BlaineJ

    BlaineJ Extra

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    Yeah, but what movie is that playing?
    It looks like a Star Wars movie but I can't place it.
     
  8. MickeS

    MickeS Producer

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    The Fifth Element.
    /Mike
     
  9. RAF

    RAF Lead Actor

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    As a person who has a couple of movie poster frames (with plastic protective coverings) I can tell you with authority that whether or not the frames will detract from the picture depends entirely on the type of monitor used.
    If you have a direct view set or a Rear Projection Monitor these are sources of light and, yes, they will reflect off the surface of the poster frames.
    However, (and this is an important point in my HT) if the source is a front projector then the light from the projector does not reflect off the screen onto the poster frame surfaces - at least not to any extent to be noticeable. In fact, with the room darkened for viewing you don't even know the frames are in the room. (Of course, lighted frames, especially those with moving lights or neon would be an entirely different matter altogether and I would never have these in my HT but in a "lobby" area.)
    In my case, when I use the RPM, a 45" Pioneer Elite, it is far enough away from the frames not to cause a problem or any distraction at all. And I've already told you that the frames do not interfere with front projection. Had any of this been a problem the frames would have come down, trust me.
    Interestingly, my computer monitors in the back of the room are another matter entirely. I can have the monitors on while using the VW10HT front projector with no problem. But if I'm using the Pioneer Elite (with it's reflective covering which I like for the improved image and the protection from prying grandkid fingers) I can see the monitor as a reflection. This is not a problem, however. I just make sure to turn the computer monitor off when using the RPM.
    ------------------
    RAF
    [Demented Video Dude since 1997]
    [Computer Maven since 1956]
    ["PITA" since 1942]
    My HT (latest update 02/05/01)
     
  10. David Tolsky

    David Tolsky Supporting Actor

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    I'm with RonP. Put up your posters and if you have a reflective problem, drape black felt or duvatine over them for movie time. Movie posters are one of the joys of a home theater room. Nothing will stop me from putting some up. I plan on future front projection for my HT room so perhaps (according to RAF) I won't have major reflection problems.
    "Build a theater with it's purpose in mind..."
    Uh, sorry Jay. It's still a room in my house and I want it to look great. I want it to be a showpiece as well as a functional theater room. If I worked for Widescreen Review, perhaps I would paint my walls black and make a theater lab.
    But this is my house and I love movie posters. If I have to, I'll drape black felt over the glass.
    [Edited last by David Tolsky on July 19, 2001 at 12:46 AM]
     
  11. Todd Hochard

    Todd Hochard Cinematographer

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    You can get a matte finish protective covering, that, in fact, is not unlike the ribbed finish of a lenticular screen. I've had a few of these over the years (for artwork, not movie posters), and these don't reflect hardly anything.
    Whose theater are we bashing, anyway? [​IMG]
    Todd
     
  12. Jay Mitchosky

    Jay Mitchosky Producer

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  13. Keith M.

    Keith M. Second Unit

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    Isnt that a 10ht Front Projector in the theater being discussed?
    I think reflective light would be noticable with ANY video source. When it comes to FP, the screen type is the determining factor. (gain values)
    I could have sworn i have seen a framing website which offered "non-reflective" frames...
    Well, at least there not the old blacklight posters. It might be a bit distracting to be watching a movie and see a black panther and naked woman on the wall glowing purple...
     
  14. Mike Brantley

    Mike Brantley Stunt Coordinator

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    I haven't had too much problem with reflections off my framed posters from my viewing position. Of course, now that you guys have brought it up I'm sure I'll start to notice reflections. Thanks a lot! [​IMG]
    Seriously, I think you'll be OK if you don't put the posters and and other reflective surfaces too close to the screen. Also, be mindful of what you see from your viewing position. On the home theater cited at the top of the thread, for all we know there are no reflections visible from the where the viewers sit. Those reflections may only show up when standing where the photographer was positioned.
    Cheers!
    ------------------
    Mike Brantley
    Our Theater:
    Mike & Cheryl's Screening Room
     
  15. RAF

    RAF Lead Actor

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  16. David Tolsky

    David Tolsky Supporting Actor

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    Jay, no sweat. To be honest, I didn't even look at the link you included in your post. It was just the thought of having a home theater without theater posters that tripped my trigger a bit [​IMG]
    Now, having looked at the photos, that would drive me nuts too. I'd still want to leave the poster there but I'd take measures to cover it for show time.
    Cheers
    David
     

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