why no digital cameras with film photo option?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by EricW, Jul 2, 2002.

  1. EricW

    EricW Cinematographer

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    the only obvious drawback to me of digital cameras is you can't just go to say Black's and get it made into a photograph. i'm aware there are printers that can produce a near-perfect printout, but that's expensive.
    my question is what are the technical limitations that prevent this option? are they even working on a new type of camera that will be able to make film photographs?
     
  2. JohnAD

    JohnAD Cinematographer

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    There's no need. If you want film, there are film cameras. If you want digital, there are digital cameras. The major difference is that the CCD in a digital camera has a limited number of pixels, so even at several megapixels, it will still be grainier than a photograph.

    John.
     
  3. Bill Catherall

    Bill Catherall Screenwriter

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    There are online "digital devoloping" services as well. Check out Ofoto.com (a Kodak company) or Photoworks.com. Ofoto is $.49/print (4x6 inch) and Photoworks is $.19/print. It looks like Ofoto lets you just upload the pictures via the internet, but Photoworks requires you to either send in your memory card or a CD-ROM. I'm sure there are others if you look around.
     
  4. Cam S

    Cam S Screenwriter

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    I always get Digital Camera pictures developed, all you have to do is take in your digital camera memory card or put them on a floppy, cd or whatever, bring them in, and they develope them for you.
     
  5. Dave E H

    Dave E H Supporting Actor

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  6. Jared_B

    Jared_B Supporting Actor

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    There are at least 3 stores in my local mall that will take your memory card and develop the pictures from it onto photo paper, just as if you handed them a roll of film.

    I see no reason to ever get a film camera again, especially since prices are dropping. The latest prosumer digitals are in the 5-6 megapixel range, and they are near 35mm quality with 11x14 prints.
     
  7. Jack Fanning

    Jack Fanning Second Unit

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    I set up an online photo album at webshots.com

    It has an option to order prints...just click on the ones you want and in a few days they arrive in your mailbox for $0.49 per print...pretty painless and the pics are decent quality.
     
  8. Todd Hochard

    Todd Hochard Cinematographer

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    My local Costco will do one-hour photo processing of digital photos, when you drop off a floppy, CDR, memory stick or flash.
    0.20 per 4x6, 0.99 per 5x7, and 1.49 for 8x10. Not bad, AND, I'm happy to report, the quality meets or exceeds every online photo printer I've tried (the best being Snapfish, the worst being Ofoto).
    And, at 0.20 per print, that's cheaper than a new printer, paper and cartridges. Heck, that's getting close to 35mm (25 prints for $5).

    Oh, and I have one 4Mpixel 8x10 (taken with Olympus E-10, printed by Snapfish) on the wall with three professionally-taken 8x10s (all of my lovely daughter). NO ONE has been able to correctly identify the digital photo yet (I've asked about 20 people so far), and all are of exceptional quality.

    The only drawback to most of the digital cameras is the lack of being able to click-click-click in rapid succession. I currently have the Sony DSC-S70 (since July 2000). My next one will be the Canon EOS60 or better.

    Todd
     
  9. Andrew W

    Andrew W Supporting Actor

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    You should look for a lab with a Fuji Frontier machine.
    Just save your digital images at 300 pixels/inch.

    I can print 8"x10" and smaller that are of the same quality as 35mm prints. The 8x10 have to be sampled up slightly, but this is easily done in Photoshop with no visible quality loss.
     
  10. Greg_R

    Greg_R Screenwriter

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    Todd,
    Some digital cameras allow you to take multiple exposures. My Nikon CoolPix allows me to take 1 to 16 consecutive shots. However, there is a significant storage time between set of shots. (i.e. click-click-click-long storage time) I've found that this works well for my amateur usage.
     
  11. Allan

    Allan Stunt Coordinator

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    Anyone know of any places in New York City that will develop digital pics directly from a memory card? Or, any national chains that do so?

    Thanks
    allan
     
  12. Ryan Wright

    Ryan Wright Screenwriter

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  13. Danny R

    Danny R Supporting Actor

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    The major difference is that the CCD in a digital camera has a limited number of pixels

    Actually the major difference is that a digital camera has a much more limited range of color. Today's top of the line digital cameras can equal the resolution of average photos from cheaper 35mm cameras.

    Film does have a resolution you see, as each grain of silver halide is the equivalent of a pixel. While not exactly the same, a top grade 35mm film image has the equivalent of 12 megapixels of information.

    And much of that information can be lost when the film is developed and transfered to paper.

    The major difference is that film is an analog medium, and can capture far more transitions in color and shading than any digital format can.
     
  14. Todd Hochard

    Todd Hochard Cinematographer

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