Why more power per channel in 5.1 than 6.1? I thought Denon had separate amps per ch?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Kyle_Y, Nov 21, 2001.

  1. Kyle_Y

    Kyle_Y Stunt Coordinator

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    In S&V's test of the Denon 2802, it had 74x5w(5 channel) but in DTSES(six channel) it pumped out 61x6w. Seems like a little, but compare it to Sony's 31 watts! Why is it that there is less power per channel in 6 channel mode if the receiver has 6 separate internal power amps for each channel? Wouldn't that mean that whether it was 2,5 or 6 channel sound, the amount per channel would only reach a certain maximum, the maximum that each individual amp could handle, or is this due to the transformer not being able to provide power to all 6 channels?
     
  2. Chuck Kent

    Chuck Kent Supporting Actor

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    Kyle: You're on the right track. The 2802's power supply (or any unit's) can only do so much.

    It makes sense if you think about it. Think of the power supply as a pie. Each piece of a pie sliced into 5 pieces is bigger per slice than a pie sliced into 6 pieces. The same for your 2802...
     
  3. Vietor

    Vietor Stunt Coordinator

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    74 * 5 = 370 watts

    61 * 6 = 366 watts

    Makes sense to me, that seems to be the limit that the power supply can deliver regardless of what individual components are requireing it.

    I would be interested to know what the max power intake in amps is of the reciver, it shoud be labled somewhere on the back. I wonder because my Onkyo 595, claims 75x5, and says it draws 4.7 amps, even assumming 1 amp of that goes to feed the two power plugs in the back of the unit (which say max combined power draw is not to exceede 120 watts, which is one amp @ 120 volts) that leaves 3.7 amps * 120 volts, or 444 watts for the reciver. Which theoreticaly means that it could put out 75 watts per channel and still have 70 watts to run internal electronics. But I seriously doubt that this is the case. And thus I would be intersted to know the rated power draw of the 2802.

    Try to make sense of my ramblings, its late and I'm working on a paper thats due tommorow.
     
  4. Chris PC

    Chris PC Producer

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    I agree. The amplifier stages for each individual channel may be discrete amplifier stages, but they all rely on the receivers main power supply and that is what limits the overall power per channel. Thats why if you use a separate amp for, say, the front channels, you may find that the remaining channels are able to ouput higher wattage.
     

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