Why is "warm" cooler than "cool"?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by MickeS, Jun 6, 2001.

  1. MickeS

    MickeS Producer

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    Sorry if the subject line is bad, didn't know how to put it.
    On a TV with adjustable color temperature, why is it that the coolest setting (6500K) is referred to as "warm", while a warmer setting like 12000K is referred to as "cool"?
    Does color temperature not work the same as other temperature? Today for example, the outside temperature here is 312K, but tonight it will be cooler, probably more like 293K. Do these Kelvin temperatures not mean the same thing as those used for colors?
    I guess I'm not understanding the "color temperature" thing correctly?
    /Mike
     
  2. Michael TLV

    Michael TLV THX Video Instructor/Calibrator

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    Location:
    Calgary, Alberta
    Real Name:
    Michael Chen
    Greetings
    The colour temp for the TV is based upon heating a certain piece of metal (magnesium I think) to various temperatures.
    When you heat it to 6500K it gives off a neutral white glow.
    At 5400K ... the glow is red ...
    At 14000K ... the glow is blue
    Historically Blue has always been associated with cool ...
    Red has been associated with warm.
    In terms of actual hot cold values ... things inthe blue spectrum are hotter than in the red.
    Red giant stars are not as hot as blue dwarf stars.
    It's just a historic thing ...
    Regards
     
  3. MickeS

    MickeS Producer

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    So basically "warm" and "cool" just means "more red" and "more blue" as far as TV adjustments go, regardless of whether the temperature is higher or lower. Thanks for the answer and the explanation.
    /Mike
     

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