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why is so HDMI input important on AVR and Processors (1 Viewer)

pink

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I can't understand the importance everybody is putting on HDMI inputs trough a AVR or Processesor, why would anybody would want to loop a signal, please explain because I just don't get, maybe I am missing something. I always go streight to the source. Why would you want to loop any signal.
 

gene c

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The HDMI hoopla is mostly for the new audio formats. For video, it's simplicity. Use the receiver as a switcher. One hdmi cable for both audio and video for each source, then one cable to the display. So it's mostly the simplicity. BTW, my two receivers lack hdmi so I run my sources straight to the display. I've haven't used any receiver as a video switcher yet. I use analog for the new DD format (but not DTS-MA :frowning: ).
 

pat00139

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It's for simplicity, as gene c said. My projector doesn't have tons of inputs, so my receiver does just that, receive. One cable handles everything, and it's a LOT easier to switch between sources. It's a lot simpler and saves a lot of problems when someone else uses your system. If you look in the back of my system, I have three cables coming in and one going out. Saves a lot time and money from buying various cables.
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Also, some receivers, usually higher-end one, have great video processors, so the scaling would be a lot better than what you'd get on your player. For example, some of the higher end Denons have the Reon chip, which does a much better job at scaling/de-interlacing than, say, the Panasonic BD players. That's another reason you'd want to pass your video through your receiver/pre-amp.

A third, slightly silly, but still acceptable reason, is that some people want to see the Dolby TrueHD and DTS-HD MA light shine on their receiver, and the only way to do this is by bitstreaming the audio through HDMI to your receiver.
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(By the way, you're not looping the signal, you're passing it through the receiver/pre-amp. Looping is something else.
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Lew Crippen

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There is no need to go straight to the source as digital signals, unlike analog, do not degrade. So there is no reason not to use an AVR as an expensive switch if one chooses. The simplicity of audio and video both going to the AVR in a single cable and then using only one cable from the AVR to the display appeals to many.

Since there is no downside—and for some there is an upside, why not use the AVR to switch audio and video?

I assume that your use of the term loop is (mis)used in this context. If you actually meant it in some other context then just ignore the above.

As an aside, I'm not sure that everybody places importance on this issue.
 

Jeff Gatie

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Although the "I want to see the light" stuff is silly to some, it really has nothing to do with HDMI. It has to do with whether the player or the receiver does the decoding of HD audio. Aside from analog 5/7.1 connections (not present in some players), the only way to get both undecoded and decoded HD audio to the receiver is via HDMI. Due to limitations placed on the SPDIF (optical/coax) standard, whether decoded to LPCM via the player or shipped as raw bitstream to be decoded in the receiver, only HDMI has the capability to carry the HD audio stream.
 

ManW_TheUncool

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For those who use analog connections, do your receivers/prepros apply bass management, distance time delay, etc. for that? If not, that would be another consideration.

_Man_
 

gene c

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My Pioneer 59txi is one of the few receivers that does BM, auto setup-eq, bass/treble controls, etc, thru the 6/8 channel analog inputs. There is probably a slight quality degradation as the signal goes thru a digital-to-analog conversion. Most receivers route the signal from the 6/8 channel inputs straight to the volume control bypassing all processing, including things like Audessey EQ. This could be an issue for someone without an hdmi 1.3 receiver. Onkyo's do apply bass and treble controls on most models, at least they used to. My Samsung 1400 BR player only does speaker size and bass mngnt with a fixed 100hz crossover for output thru the 6/8 analogs. It doesn't do time delay. Also, BR players that decode the new formats internally and send it out the 6/8 channel outputs are usually much more expensive than those that only send it out thru hdmi and let the avr do the decoding. I'm far from an expert in this, but I think at least most of what I've said is accurate.
 

pink

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Thanks for the replies, I am sure learning something here.
 

Jeff Gatie

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pink said:

Lew's information is also the reason for not spending hundreds of dollars on Monster type HDMI cables. Since there is no degradation, you aren't going to get anything except overbuild from a high priced cable. The smart shopper goes to Monoprice, BlueJeans or BetterCables and spends $10-20 for what will cost you $100's from Monster and other thieves . . . errrrm . . . I mean manufacturers.
 

Holadem

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1 cable instead of 4 (1 for digital audio, 3 for component video.)

The better question is why anyone wouldn't want HDMI everywhere.

--
H
 

JeremyErwin

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Why is HDMI so important? Sometimes, a picture is worth a thousand words.



If you don't have HDMI, you're out of luck.

Less extreme are the cheaper players without a multichannel audi output.

Now, you can go out and buy a bluray player with full multichannel audio outs, but that means you'll have to disconnect your SACD player.
 

pink

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Good answer, thanks. It's not the HDMI I am questioning, but why go trough a receiver or processor.
 

Rich Allen

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Most people have a couple of HDMI sources, cablebox, sat box, blu-ray player, etc. I have all mine going into my receiver and just one output to the TV. When I switch sources on the receiver, I don't have to switch the input on the TV.

And with the digital signals, there is no degredation be doing so.
 

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