Why is it that no movies is shoot in direct sunlight...??

Discussion in 'Movies' started by Kristoffer, Dec 14, 2003.

  1. Kristoffer

    Kristoffer Second Unit

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2002
    Messages:
    460
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Ok, something I have been thinking about this for a long time, and it is something I notice on almost all the films I watch is;
    That most films are shoot in shadows, all people has shadows on their faces! Even in a film like X Men 2.
    I realize that it is hard to shot in direct sunlight with a camera, but why does the director chose to put shadows on everybody faces? Maybe it is just me, but a film like Dogville is shot in direct light for a major part of the movie.
    Just wondering...

    Edit; I know it was supposed to be shot in direct...
     
  2. Steve Felix

    Steve Felix Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2001
    Messages:
    618
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Shadows give apparent depth to 2-D images - shooting without them is known as "flat lighting" and is not a desirable state. It makes pictures boring and uninvolving. You will see flat lighting in low budget productions such as local news, because it's generally quick and artless.

    "Low key" lighting refers to shadows dominating over light, and is probably what you notice the most. It's the cinematographer being selective with what is seen (and how) for dramatic impact.

    Edit: Dogville (which I haven't seen) was shot according to Dogme 95 standards I believe, which call for natural light only. Therefore, the lighting can't be expected to be optimal, and is a choice based on something other than what the best image would be.
     
  3. Jean-Michel

    Jean-Michel Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2002
    Messages:
    769
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
     
  4. Ken Seeber

    Ken Seeber Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 1999
    Messages:
    787
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Speaking as a former professional photographer, I can give you two good reasons.

    First of all, squinting. It's virtually impossible for someone with direct sunlight in their face not to squint, which doesn't make for a good shot. When I had to photograph someone outdoors I always tried to either take them into a shadow, or at least get the sun behind them and then fill in the highlights with a flash.

    Second, direct sunlight just isn't flattering. You have harsh shadows and blown-out highlights. Every line and wrinkle shows up. Not good.
     
  5. Steve Felix

    Steve Felix Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2001
    Messages:
    618
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
     
  6. Kristoffer

    Kristoffer Second Unit

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2002
    Messages:
    460
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Ok, thanks for all those answers!
     

Share This Page