Why is Ally McBeal out in England but not here?

Discussion in 'TV on DVD and Blu-ray' started by Mark To, Jan 6, 2005.

  1. Mark To

    Mark To Supporting Actor

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    All 5 seasons have been out in the UK for a long time. Was the show more popular there? I don't get it.
     
  2. andrew markworthy

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    No - it had a strong cult following but most Brits found it tedious. It often surprises Americans to look at Brit TV schedules. A lot of your really big name shows (Star Trek, CSI, etc) are rarely in prime time slots over here (e.g. Star Trek went out at 6.00 in the evening - prime time for us is circa 9.00 in the evening). However, they do attract strong followings amongst relatively small groups of the TV audience.

    I think the reason why America hasn't got Ally McBeal yet has very little to do with relative popularity and rather more to do with licensing agreements. Generally speaking, Brit programmes go to DVD faster than American ones. Because you guys have much greater emphasis on syndication rights, etc, I think this holds things up for you.

    However, if it's any consolation, you're likely to get better editions if the experience of Friends is anything to go by (we got the whole back catalogue years before you guys did, but in a lot of instances we got the cut for syndication and adverts versions [​IMG] ).
     
  3. Justin_Waine

    Justin_Waine Extra

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    Actually I heard the reason holding Ally up in the US is the music liceansing.
     
  4. John McM

    John McM Second Unit

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    well, Ally McBeal is currently nowhere to be shown on American screens, FX phased it out and it left their schedule early lst year.

    If the licensing rights are such a pain for the US, why did things come out spotlessly in England?

    But sorry, better Friends DVD's is no consolation prize to me over not getting Ally McBeal... Friends is on three different channels every night, Ally McBeal is in rerun limbo.
     
  5. John McM

    John McM Second Unit

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    but what's with that? why was it cleared overseas and not here?
     
  6. James Reader

    James Reader Screenwriter

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    to quote from my blog:


    It just about sums it up. TV on home video has been much more popular over here than in America before the TVonDVD boom. After all, when you only have 4 channels, as we did then, there's every chance you'll be waiting for a long time, if not forever, until a rerun. Subsequently UK and European rights were aquired with the broadcast rights for most American series.
     
  7. Justin_Waine

    Justin_Waine Extra

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    All I know is, in England it is easier to get music clearance than here in the US.. I'm sorry I can't be specific thats all I know.
     
  8. andrew markworthy

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    I know this is a forlorn hope (and I'm not picking on you specifically, Justin) but could you guys please call it the UK and not England? It's like Brits deciding to call the USA 'California' and wondering why this annoyed Americans.
     
  9. John McM

    John McM Second Unit

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    well, I used to be blonde when I was a kid, so I know this might come off as a stupid question. But if something comes out in England... is it an "import" in Ireland? or would it be the same as something that was pressed in California, yet in NY or Florida you can get it too?
     
  10. andrew markworthy

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    If it's Eire (i.e. the Republic of Ireland) then yes. But to Northern Ireland, Scotland or Wales, then no. There are no customs barriers between the countries. The only key difference is that Scotland has a slightly different legal system. Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales also have their own governments for some issues and can choose whether or not to enact some pieces of legislation (e.g. Wales won't implement tuition fees in universities when they come into force in England next year). However, in the main the countries work as one.

    What really drives anyone in the UK but not living in England up the wall is the assumption that 'English' is a direct synonym of 'British'. I'm not personally offended (although I now live in Wales, I was born English), but if you want to get on the wrong side of a lot of people in the UK, then keep using 'English' as shorthand for all UK citizens.

    Just to confuse matters, it's perfectly okay to use 'English' when very specifically referring to someone from England, in the same way as one might say 'Welsh' or'Scottish' (please, never 'Scotch'), buit just don't use it as a general term.
     
  11. PhilipG

    PhilipG Cinematographer

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    Oh, don't be so silly, Andrew!! [​IMG] It's endearing. Like when those lovely Americans think Scotland is in England.

    And, er, "forlorn"? Are you using that word because we're on an American forum? Reminds me of when I was working in North America briefly (or should I say "the USA"?) - I suddenly became much more "English", and would subconsciously be using language not heard since pre-WW times. [​IMG]
     

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