1. Sign-up to become a member, and most of the ads you see will disappear. It only takes 30 seconds to sign up, so join the discussion today!
    Dismiss Notice

Why I Own So Many Movies.

Discussion in 'Blu-ray and UHD' started by Mike Frezon, Sep 18, 2018.

Tags:
  1. Adam Lenhardt

    Adam Lenhardt Director

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2001
    Messages:
    20,388
    Likes Received:
    5,081
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Location:
    Albany, NY
    Now that a bunch of us have had a chance to weigh in, if you don't mind me asking, what's YOUR answer? :)
     
    PMF likes this.
  2. English Invader

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2018
    Messages:
    19
    Likes Received:
    20
    Trophy Points:
    10
    Real Name:
    Simon
    I loved the essay. A written testament for a lot of my feelings over the years.

    My passion for films began in the early 90s when I was 13 and my opportunities to buy video tapes were few and far between but I treasured the ones I got. A couple of years later and I had a little bit more money and some of the tapes came down a little bit in price but I still had to be selective with the ones I bought. I followed my nose and was rarely disappointed.

    My first opportunity to fully indulge myself was around 2006 when there was a big boom of people dumping their VHS tapes in charity shops as they upgraded to DVD. My only income was £60 a week unemployment benefit but films were available for as little as 20p a time and I lived like a king.

    Fast forward to 2018 and I'm about 4 months into my Blu-Ray collection and have hundreds of DVDs and VHS tapes that I should downsize but for some reason I just can't do it.

    That's as close an answer to the question as I can manage.
     
    SAhmed and Sam Posten like this.
  3. Message #63 of 79 Sep 24, 2018
    Last edited: Sep 25, 2018
    PMF

    PMF Producer

    Joined:
    May 6, 2015
    Messages:
    3,235
    Likes Received:
    3,117
    Trophy Points:
    4,110
    Real Name:
    Philip
    I'm now inspired to run a BD and Breakfast.
    Maybe I'll name it The 4Korners Inn.
    One guest room w/ one custom selected viewing upon a projected 120" screen.
    All proceeds shall go to every licensee towards future restorations.
    Ah, yes, another collection of day-dreams; ongoing and never ending;
    but still a collection, just the same.:)
     
    MarkA likes this.
  4. Dick

    Dick Lead Actor
    Supporter

    Joined:
    May 22, 1999
    Messages:
    7,512
    Likes Received:
    3,820
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Location:
    Maine
    Real Name:
    Rick
    It says you're like me and many others here. I have amassed about 4500 movies on disc (1500 DVD's, 3000 on Blu-ray) and just keep on plugging, except when times are hard, at which time I have to sell off a chunk of stuff (one of those times is happening now). Truth is, I haven't ever watched about 300-400 of these films even once yet, most of them foreign language films, which I generally love but have to be in a certain mood for.

    When 8mm and Super 8mm were the only means a fan had of collecting (albeit mostly severely truncated editions), I owned hundreds of those. I can't even remember where the money came from! -- those little reels weren't cheap, especially the color/sound ones.

    When VHS came around, I built up a very space-hogging collection of some 500 of these. Damn! To be able to own feature-length films and watch them anytime...it was alchemy! By then I was working and I can remember spending almost every penny of "disposable" income on this hobby. And t.v. screens were still small enough that even VHS looked passable.

    But laser disc came along and I began to sell off my cassettes. I bought a 27" set and VHS was beginning to seem a little crappy, but those lasers were awesome. Freeze-frames. Incredible definition (425 lines!!), special bonus materials, commentaries and, soon enough, letterboxing! A film collector's friggin' paradise.

    By the time DVD surfaced, I'd pretty much dumped all of my VHS tapes, even ones that hadn't yet been released on this better format (almost all of the ones I discarded are now available, I am relieved to say).

    DVD was an exponential jump in PQ and led me to purchase a 46" display. Wow! A real theater-like experience in my own living space!

    And, of course, Blu-ray followed, and I now watch my movies on a 65" 4K, 3D OLED. That is almost certainly as far as I'll ever get, but I am totally satisfied with it. In my small apartment, it is a completely immersive experience to watch movies on this with a 5.1 sound system.

    I will cherish my DVD's and Blu-rays, even the unwatched titles, because I have always been devoted to film, and having such a great way to watch them in my apartment makes it worth it to me to have accrued what many would think was a ridiculously self-indulgent collection. I never used to understand why people collected stamps or coins that are hidden away inside books, but I think I get it now.
     
  5. Mike Frezon

    Mike Frezon Moderator
    Moderator

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2001
    Messages:
    47,838
    Likes Received:
    11,919
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Location:
    Rensselaer, NY
    I don't think I have much new to add on the subject, really.

    I get the question a lot. I used to get it more when I had most of my movie collection on shelves in our living room (where our HT is located). After we became empty-nesters, Peg convinced me to relocate my discs (both music and film) into one of our newly-emptied bedrooms. Where the door is usually closed. And hidden away from visitors. :D

    Many of those who know I purchase movies-on-disc--especially in this day-and-age of downloading and streaming and digital files--often give me a raised eyebrow. And both of my own children--who are now adults and finding their own way through the world (and the world of movie and TV entertainment) consider me a dinosaur. (Some earlier posts in this thread about what happens to our collections after our death gave me great pause. My dad, who died five years ago had built up a collected of dozens upon dozens of old, tube table-top radios. Buying old radios at auction, flea markets and garage sales and then putting them to working order was one of his joys in retirement. He was smart enough to know (and accept) that his end was coming and so figured out a way to suitably dispose of his collection--just so that his heirs would not have to--a pretty generous thing.)

    I'm not the cinephile that many here on this forum are. There are HTF members who have very specific ties to various genres--Westerns, Noir, SciFi, etc. Some are dedicated to certain directors--Bergman, Kurosawa, Spielberg, etc. I like a lot of different things. Amongst my very favorite films (off the top of my head) are: Doubt, Groundhog Day. The Seventh Seal, That Thing You Do!, A Christmas Carol (1951), the Toy Story films and, most recently, La La Land. These are films I have watched countless times. And like others here, there are films in my collection I've only watched once and others I have yet to even open.

    Full disclosure, I am thinking of paring discs from my collection (as I reorganize it). In particular, ones that Peg and I watched and hated and won't ever watch again. Also some contemporary films which I doubt we will ever watch again. This is for all the usual reasons: space is limited, life is short. And I've had the realization that it's not the sheer size of the collection that makes it impressive, it is the impact of that collection on the collection-holder. I'm the first to admit there are some films in my collection that can go and won't be missed. Yet there are others I go looking for, and when I can't find them, I get agita!

    We all know that movie-making is a collaborative experience. Just look at the people listed in the closing credits of any contemporary film! Films result from the work of the writers and their story, the director and his vision, the actors and their abilities, the DP and their unique visual perspective and on and on. Well, I think the process continues after the films hit the theaters or our shelves in our homes as we, the viewers, then watch the film in our unique settings, on our own unique gear and with our own unique sensibilities and often our fleeting moods (which can enhance or detract from our enjoyment of what we watch). Hence, one man's treasure can be another man's trash...and why all our collections are different.

    So, for me, being able to watch what I want, when I want, (usually factoring in my fairly constant viewing companion, Peg) is not an insignificant thing. Movies are a great entertainment and a great enjoyment. I am blessed to have my collection, the amazing gear on which I watch it and the roof over my head that houses it all.
     
  6. Message #66 of 79 Sep 24, 2018
    Last edited: Sep 25, 2018
    Billy Batson

    Billy Batson Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2008
    Messages:
    2,893
    Likes Received:
    1,544
    Trophy Points:
    4,110
    Location:
    London
    Real Name:
    Alan
    A comment by BarryR on the other thread interested me.

    "I now have "The Sacred 300" as an estimate, followed by the "Nice to Have Around" 100, followed by recent movies or new acquisitions I may or may not keep in the long run. I'm always weeding out new and old that I doubt I'll ever view again."

    I don't have that many "sacred" films, but thinking about the films I really love, they're nearly all films I saw in the late fifties & sixties, both on TV & at the cinema. A few seventies & not that much past 1980, & of course there's been lots of great films in the last forty years, films I've loved & am very happy to own on DVD & Blu-ray, but my theory is, films, albums, books that I loved before I was thirty (1980), are really part of my DNA now, there's a sort of magic to them for me. These days it's very rare that I listen to a pop/rock album that wasn't released in the seventies.
     
    PMF likes this.
  7. Keith Cobby

    Keith Cobby Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2013
    Messages:
    2,124
    Likes Received:
    1,253
    Trophy Points:
    1,610
    Location:
    Kent "The Garden of England", UK
    Real Name:
    Keith Cobby
    I used to collect DVDs but when blu rays came out decided to only buy favourites and large format films. Having disposed of the others I am now down to about 500 blu ray and 200 DVDs. Will upgrade the blu rays to 4k when possible and have 4 so far (including the wonderful La La Land).
     
    PMF likes this.
  8. Bert Greene

    Bert Greene Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2004
    Messages:
    602
    Likes Received:
    433
    Trophy Points:
    610
    It's no mystery to me why I collect film/tv. When I was a kid, I had access to three tv-channels, and they were actually quite obliging when it came to airing old movies. Lots of afternoon theaters and late-shows. I developed a real love for vintage film fare. Then, my family moved to a different locality, where there were also three tv-channels available. But these three local stations were very, very weak on airing old films. No option of cable-tv, no option of VCR's yet. Several years I endured this dreary situation, and it was such an intense ache to again view the type of old films I loved, from Universal horrors to B-westerns to slapstick comedies to detective film series. Losing access to such things for several years was almost viscerally painful to me. That feeling of 'loss,' and my genuine questioning of whether I'd ever again get to see some of my favored films, really seared into me. When VHS became available, cable-tv had already arrived, and I became a tape-recording madman, trying to capture copies of anything and everything that might even marginally appeal to my tastes.

    During that fallow period, however, there WAS one distant independent station that did air rare old films almost all night long. But the station was so weak and so far away, I could never get a signal during the daylight hours, and only about once-a-week during nighttime hours. I'd attempt to watch so many films through a thick curtain of snow. Very often I'd get an acceptable picture when a movie started, but then totally lose it into complete snow thirty minutes later. I'd see so many 'bits and pieces' of old movies. But it was all I had at the time. The only way to quench my thirst for vintage film, for several years. I suppose it seems rather pathetic in retrospect, but in those pre-cable, pre-vcr days, I had to grasp at straws.

    Undoubtedly due to all these experiences, I don't really trust streaming, the cloud, even the internet as a whole. In the back of my mind, it's all a rug that can pulled away from me at a moment's notice. I have to have a disc, and hold it in my hands.
     
  9. BarryR

    BarryR Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2000
    Messages:
    693
    Likes Received:
    106
    Trophy Points:
    610
    Location:
    Earth
    Real Name:
    BARRY RIVADUE

    Thank you for reprinting part of my post from the other thread! It was the essential message I wanted to say.

    To me the Sacred 300 are the movies that have become part of my DNA, to borrow your term. I find myself especially revisiting the '60s/'70s, my most impressionable years growing up. No surprise they make up the bulk of my collection. New movies have to prove themselves more, particularly in an age so overwrought with CGI spectacle I get bored to tears with.

    I do though have quite a generous amount of movies from all other decades, but the '60s/'70s are the most "autobiographical," as it were. They have a special resonance since I saw so many in a theater back then, an experience so rare nowadays for a lot of reasons. One reason is "going to the movies" is not the event it used to be. But at least with my collection I have such a wonderous array of movies at the ready.
     
    Vic Pardo, atfree and PMF like this.
  10. CarlosMeat

    CarlosMeat Second Unit
    Supporter

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2018
    Messages:
    266
    Likes Received:
    161
    Trophy Points:
    111
    Real Name:
    Carlos
    Nice post very very similar to my take although often 30's to early 60's have a special place for me. I can't say why except perhaps this was my fathers time and he spoke of those days many many books around our home from that period etc.. not sure why.
     
  11. BarryR

    BarryR Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2000
    Messages:
    693
    Likes Received:
    106
    Trophy Points:
    610
    Location:
    Earth
    Real Name:
    BARRY RIVADUE
    Growing up in the '60s, my watching movies from the '30s and '40s was not a big deal because those decades were still rather "recent." My parents's generation too. Second nature for them to refer to the '40s and earlier. The '50s seemed like yesterday, historically, though I was too young to remember.

    I'm glad Buster Keaton has admirers under the age of 30.

    <_<:D
     
    PMF and Suzanne.S like this.
  12. stevenHa

    stevenHa Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2005
    Messages:
    232
    Likes Received:
    22
    Trophy Points:
    110
    I don't know if anyone else has the same basis for collecting dvds, but I am interested in visual effects including stop motion animation and matte paintings so I wanted to collect as many examples of films that showcase them. I also have a small number of just great or favorite films and comedies. When I moved I was forced to get rid of about 1/4 of my belongings so I had to go from collecting every example of movies with matte paintings to deciding which movies had the best examples. I had to decide to keep Laurel and Hardy but get rid of The Three Stooges since the former isn't on tv too often but the later is on everyday. I would keep Ben Hur, Spartacus, and The Robe but get rid of King of Kings (both versions) and Helen of Troy. Keep the 3 Willis O'Brien ape films but get rid of The Lost World and Black Scorpion. I had all the Sean Connery Bond films but only kept Russia and Diamonds (also have the flawed blu of Goldeneye). I tried to pick the best examples of matte paintings from each studio which also showed different types of scene extensions (grand ceilings, cliffs, trees, buildings, etc.)
     
  13. Peter M Fitzgerald

    Peter M Fitzgerald Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 1999
    Messages:
    1,972
    Likes Received:
    784
    Trophy Points:
    1,610
    Real Name:
    Peter Fitzgerald
    I blame this guy. Admittedly, his collection is pretty damned impressive.

     
    PMF, Suzanne.S, TravisR and 1 other person like this.
  14. BobO'Link

    BobO'Link Producer

    Joined:
    May 3, 2008
    Messages:
    4,263
    Likes Received:
    4,136
    Trophy Points:
    4,110
    Location:
    Mid-South
    Real Name:
    Howie
    It's really pretty simple for me: I love movies. The reason I own so many is so that I can watch what *I* want to watch *when* I want to watch it. At my house there's *always* something "good" on...
     
    Doug Wallen, PMF, Thomas T and 6 others like this.
  15. Sam Posten

    Sam Posten Moderator
    Moderator

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 1997
    Messages:
    24,928
    Likes Received:
    3,577
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Location:
    Aberdeen, MD & Navesink, NJ
    Real Name:
    Sam Posten
    RAF's widow marked that it has been 7 years since his passing this week. Still sorely missed!
     
    Scott Merryfield, PMF and SAhmed like this.
  16. Message #76 of 79 Oct 1, 2018
    Last edited: Oct 1, 2018
    Steven Simon

    Steven Simon Producer

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 1998
    Messages:
    3,279
    Likes Received:
    12
    Trophy Points:
    110
    Real Name:
    Steven Simon
    Raf was truly an awesome guy! I recall so many great HTF Events we went on over the years. He made many of the Los Angeles Meets. I miss him too, and think of him often. It was an honor being a Moderator along side him for many years. He taught me much of what I know today as far as Home Theater expertise, computers, and even about life... He always had this strange ability to calm me down, when I was a young pup years ago......

    Bada Bing RAF!!!!
     
    Sam Posten, PMF, SAhmed and 2 others like this.
  17. Message #77 of 79 Oct 1, 2018
    Last edited: Oct 2, 2018
    PMF

    PMF Producer

    Joined:
    May 6, 2015
    Messages:
    3,235
    Likes Received:
    3,117
    Trophy Points:
    4,110
    Real Name:
    Philip
    Positive contributions made by those now gone becomes all the more meaningful when continued on;
    by those still present.
     
  18. Scott Merryfield

    Scott Merryfield Executive Producer

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 1998
    Messages:
    13,907
    Likes Received:
    2,130
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Location:
    Michigan
    I have been doing that for a few years now, Mike. I only have so much storage space, so I'll look at a title critically and decide if I'll ever want to watch it again. If I cannot say "yes", then it usually goes on the "sell" list. Sometimes I convert a DVD to digital copy if I'm on the fence. If I upgrade a favorite title to a new format or newer transfer, the old one always goes up for sale. I don't keep duplicates, as the extras on the discs are not a big deal to me -- I am mainly interested in the film itself. I'll watch some of the extras, but I never keep an older disc because the new version is lacking a feature from the old release.
     
  19. ABaglivi

    ABaglivi Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2012
    Messages:
    225
    Likes Received:
    122
    Trophy Points:
    110
    Real Name:
    Anthony
    Why I own so many movies? TCM again ran The Thing cropped, and cut off the ending of The Mummy's Hand mid-scene.
     
    Maxman43 and Rodney like this.

Share This Page