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Why I Own So Many Movies. (1 Viewer)

The Drifter

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Not to de-rail this thread, but FEP is one of my all-time favorite films, and definitely one of Nicholson's best performances. I re-watched FEP last year, but for the first time on Blu-ray. Incredible film.

IMHO Nicholson's best films came out during the late '60's - mid '70's era, i.e.: Easy Rider; The Last Detail; The King of Marvin Gardens; Chinatown; Five Easy Pieces; The Passenger; One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (and maybe some I missed). He was really on a roll during this time!
 

Mike Frezon

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My collection isn't a patch on many other members of this forum. But I think I would be surprised if there is a member of the HTF (who has a substantial disc collection) who hasn't gotten some attitude from family or close friends about said collection--especially in this day and age of streaming.

I am currently going through a substantial purge of my own collection (mostly removing older discs which have been upgraded...but also films which Peg and I both knew immediately would never get watched again. Lots of outright stinkers.). This process, meanwhile, has really re-opened my thinking about my collection. I love looking at my shelves and seeing all these great films. I also see discs still wrapped in plastic that I really need to get to (some of which will be first-time views).

And when Peg and I decide to have a "movie night" its great that I can pull a dozen extremely diverse titles for us to choose from.
 

Blu Eye

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My collection isn't a patch on many other members of this forum. But I think I would be surprised if there is a member of the HTF (who has a substantial disc collection) who hasn't gotten some attitude from family or close friends about said collection--especially in this day and age of streaming.

I am currently going through a substantial purge of my own collection (mostly removing older discs which have been upgraded...but also films which Peg and I both knew immediately would never get watched again. Lots of outright stinkers.). This process, meanwhile, has really re-opened my thinking about my collection. I love looking at my shelves and seeing all these great films. I also see discs still wrapped in plastic that I really need to get to (some of which will be first-time views).

And when Peg and I decide to have a "movie night" its great that I can pull a dozen extremely diverse titles for us to choose from.

I too take pleasure in knowing I have shelves of films that can be watched at a whim.

I also recently culled some discs that I know I won't watch again. Trying to get ruthless with what films I decide to let go as I only want films in my collection that I know I am going to watch again and enjoy. Most of my recent cull were generally blind purchases and predominantly modern films say post 2000 with a few exceptions.

It's not easy though. I don't want to let go of a film and then later in life to realize it was a very good film that needs a rewatch only to find that movie is expensive to repurchase. That would annoy me.

Perhaps irrational I know. I have watched many films that are artistically brilliant and profound but I have no desire to watch them again as they were just not entertaining enough or maybe too depressing a subject to look at again.

Those types of films get culled but there are grey areas.

Once I have in my collection all the films I wish to have I am hoping it will be a lean choice of films without any that will never be watched again.

It is an ongoing process and always a complex one as my tastes in some types of movies change over time.

Paradoxically it does annoy me when I am looking through my collection and unsure what I want to watch due to way too much choice. That's why I think it is important to remove films from my collection that won't get a rewatch. I can imagine many on here with the same problem and probably to an extreme degree too.

When my collection gets close to fulfilment I will probably get a monthly streaming deal with Amazon or something and use it to watch new films and others that perhaps I was not sure about or not too enthusiastic about to purchase on disc.

I generally don't go out of my comfort zone when purchasing discs and buy films that I obviously think are going to be good and worth keeping. Genres I don't like I won't buy etc.

However, with streaming I would probably broaden my horizons.
 

Alan Tully

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I too take pleasure in knowing I have shelves of films that can be watched at a whim.

Paradoxically it does annoy me when I am looking through my collection and unsure what I want to watch due to way too much choice. That's why I think it is important to remove films from my collection that won't get a rewatch. I can imagine many on here with the same problem and probably to an extreme degree too.

That's the problem I had last night: too much choice. I find it's best to decide on what film I want to watch, & then find it, otherwise there's just so many goodies, that I can't decide (I settled on Martin Scorsese's The Departed in the end).
 

BobO'Link

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Too much choice absolutely makes for difficult viewing choices. I've often spend a half hour or more selecting what I want to watch, especially if its in the unopened section. But there are also those times where I know *exactly* what I want and being able to pull it off the shelf to watch is very satisfying.

In the past month I've had 3 of the grandkids come in and ask for specific movies and TV shows because they'd been pulled from the streaming services their mom subscribes to. On every occasion I've been able to say "Yes, I have that." and pull it out for them to watch.

For those very reasons I love having a large collection - even if I do get occasional snide comments as to its size from my wife and some relatives (almost all of whom spend far more on hunting/fishing/sports than I do on movies).
 

Blu Eye

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Too much choice absolutely makes for difficult viewing choices. I've often spend a half hour or more selecting what I want to watch, especially if its in the unopened section. But there are also those times where I know *exactly* what I want and being able to pull it off the shelf to watch is very satisfying.

In the past month I've had 3 of the grandkids come in and ask for specific movies and TV shows because they'd been pulled from the streaming services their mom subscribes to. On every occasion I've been able to say "Yes, I have that." and pull it out for them to watch.

For those very reasons I love having a large collection - even if I do get occasional snide comments as to its size from my wife and some relatives (almost all of whom spend far more on hunting/fishing/sports than I do on movies).

It could be important to keep some films when it comes to the streaming companies.

We recently had that Die Hard fiasco where I think Netflix pulled it because of being "politically incorrect" or something. Can't remember the exact reason now.

There will be more of that virtue signalling going foward by streaming businesses. I am also concerned about streaming companies editing the movies and removing key scenes that they might deem too racist or whatever. It's coming down the pike I have no doubt about it.

At least in your collection you know the audio and video quality is guaranteed and the film is shown as the creators intended.

Once the physical media business becomes a very niche market due to streaming I believe a lot of films will become very expensive to buy on disc. I think the market will get new demand at some point in the future when a lot of people realize they can't watch the films they want to watch on the streaming services and so decide to buy them on disc. This will push up demand and with what I believe a limited supply of certain films available the prices will go a lot higher.

The films that are very popular such as The Godfather, Marvel superhero films, Indiana Jones, The Lord Of The Rings and Harry Potter and many others will be widely available on the streaming companies but films that are much lesser known will be removed from the services.

I don't see how a business is going to have thousands upon thousands of movies available to stream at a whim when it will be too expensive to have them all stored on servers. If they have a movie that has been watched 5 times in a year or something they will just remove it as there will be not enough demand to justify keeping it.

There is a possibility they could continue to make it available but at a cost. Maybe a one off fee of $40 to watch it despite the fact you pay a monthly subscription.

We are already starting to see this with Mulan recently costing $30 or more to watch.

Obviously that is a new film and a totally different dynamic but we will start to see more of it. It's basic supply and demand.

I have always known this was going to happen from the beginning but many still don't see it coming.

This is why I am trying to get my collection finished in the next few years of the movies I want to buy because it will get more harder and expensive going forward.

Blu Ray films are so cheap I can't believe it. 4k are fairly cheap too and prices are coming down for older releases. It's definitely a golden age not only for choice of films on physical media but also for price and quality.

Take advantage of it now while you still can.

You might regret it like not buying Bitcoin at $30.:)
 
Last edited:

rich_d

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It could be important to keep some films when it comes to the streaming companies.

We recently had that Die Hard fiasco where I think Netflix pulled it because of being "politically incorrect" or something. Can't remember the exact reason now.

There will be more of that virtue signalling going foward by streaming businesses. I am also concerned about streaming companies editing the movies and removing key scenes that they might deem too racist or whatever. It's coming down the pike I have no doubt about it.

At least in your collection you know the audio and video quality is guaranteed and the film is shown as the creators intended.

Once the physical media business becomes a very niche market due to streaming I believe a lot of films will become very expensive to buy on disc. I think the market will get new demand at some point in the future when a lot of people realize they can't watch the films they want to watch on the streaming services and so decide to buy them on disc. This will push up demand and with what I believe a limited supply of certain films available the prices will go a lot higher.

The films that are very popular such as The Godfather, Marvel superhero films, Indiana Jones, The Lord Of The Rings and Harry Potter and many others will be widely available on the streaming companies but films that are much lesser known will be removed from the services.

I don't see how a business is going to have thousands upon thousands of movies available to stream at a whim when it will be too expensive to have them all stored on servers. If they have a movie that has been watched 5 times in a year or something they will just remove it as there will be not enough demand to justify keeping it.

There is a possibility they could continue to make it available but at a cost. Maybe a one off fee of $40 to watch it despite the fact you pay a monthly subscription.

We are already starting to see this with Mulan recently costing $30 or more to watch.

Obviously that is a new film and a totally different dynamic but we will start to see more of it. It's basic supply and demand.

I have always known this was going to happen from the beginning but many still don't see it coming.

This is why I am trying to get my collection finished in the next few years of the movies I want to buy because it will get more harder and expensive going forward.

Blu Ray films are so cheap I can't believe it. 4k are fairly cheap too and prices are coming down for older releases. It's definitely a golden age not only for choice of films on physical media but also for price and quality.

Take advantage of it now while you still can.

You might regret it like not buying Bitcoin at $30.:)
Probably 25 years ago now, I started a thread entitled ... "You know you have a DVD problem when ..."

If I were to add to that, it would be ... you know you have a DVD problem when you think the prices are going to go up.

You also have a movie problem when you spend the majority of your time discussing the video rather than the movie itself.

I'm not sure what Mulan (as it premieres at the theatre) costing $30 to see it on your home theatre setup has to do with "why you own too many movies." Two parents could host a birthday party at home rather than seeing Mulan at the theatre for their two kids and 6 friends and be in it for $3 dollars apiece plus homemade popcorn and drinks and candy they bought at Costco ... rather than paying for $8 tickets plus overpriced drinks, popcorn and candy at the movie house. Not to mention missing the opportunity of walking on sticky floors, enduring the cellphone usage of others and the possible smell of throw-up. They could also miss out on the thrill of waiting in the parking lot for late parents to show up for their little darlings.

Bottom line, the more frictionless the activity the more likely it will be embraced.

Now, if you still want to own some videos ... well we all do. But I believe in the 80/20 rule ... where 80 percent of true benefit comes from 20 percent of all titles in your collection (or less). Face it, if we all had to go to the desert island and we could only bring 30 titles, most of us would be bringing the same titles to the island. The remainder would then get down to our own individual tastes or those titles that resonated more with us than the average film lover.

Anyway, First World Problems ...
 

jcroy

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Now, if you still want to own some videos ... well we all do. But I believe in the 80/20 rule ... where 80 percent of true benefit comes from 20 percent of all titles in your collection (or less). Face it, if we all had to go to the desert island and we could only bring 30 titles, most of us would be bringing the same titles to the island. The remainder would then get down to our own individual tastes or those titles that resonated more with us than the average film lover.

Anyway, First World Problems ...

For the hardcore ocd collector types, that ratio is probably more like 95:5 or 99:1

:)
 

Blu Eye

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Probably 25 years ago now, I started a thread entitled ... "You know you have a DVD problem when ..."

If I were to add to that, it would be ... you know you have a DVD problem when you think the prices are going to go up.

You also have a movie problem when you spend the majority of your time discussing the video rather than the movie itself.

I'm not sure what Mulan (as it premieres at the theatre) costing $30 to see it on your home theatre setup has to do with "why you own too many movies." Two parents could host a birthday party at home rather than seeing Mulan at the theatre for their two kids and 6 friends and be in it for $3 dollars apiece plus homemade popcorn and drinks and candy they bought at Costco ... rather than paying for $8 tickets plus overpriced drinks, popcorn and candy at the movie house. Not to mention missing the opportunity of walking on sticky floors, enduring the cellphone usage of others and the possible smell of throw-up. They could also miss out on the thrill of waiting in the parking lot for late parents to show up for their little darlings.

Bottom line, the more frictionless the activity the more likely it will be embraced.

Now, if you still want to own some videos ... well we all do. But I believe in the 80/20 rule ... where 80 percent of true benefit comes from 20 percent of all titles in your collection (or less). Face it, if we all had to go to the desert island and we could only bring 30 titles, most of us would be bringing the same titles to the island. The remainder would then get down to our own individual tastes or those titles that resonated more with us than the average film lover.

Anyway, First World Problems ...

Not sure your opinions offer much thought on my observations.

Firstly, I only used Mulan as an argument for demanding a high fee to watch a movie "on demand" as it was the most recent and notable at the time I posted it. There are many other movies you could use as an example where this business model has been used.

Although I am not aware of any data published on cinema ticket sales I don't think a vast majority are families taking many for a birthday party. I would presume many are sold in pairs or maybe perhaps in single form so arguing that many are watching streamed films on demand to save money or the hassle of travelling to the cinema seems fairly weak as I see it. With a film like Mulan perhaps but not films in general.

It would also depend on location dynamics as some areas it is convenient to visit the cinema and others inconvenient depending on distance from the home and lack of public transport etc. Many variables to consider.

The reason I mentioned Mulan was to highlight the trend of streaming businesses raising their prices for their services and that is why it is important to "why I own so many movies" because in time it will prove to be a cheaper and more convenient hobby as opposed to streaming.

Have not most of the streaming businesses raised their prices lately? Disney + and Netflix being two examples. Not by much I know but gradualism is always an efficient mechanism to get people to accept any changes without much opposition. The streaming companies have been losing a lot of money since their inception and it is always a useful tool to get mass adoption by offering a "cheaper than it actually costs to provide the service" type of model to begin with.

You also have the problem of when the industry or "if" the industry starts making high net profits of the content owners providing their own service.

Not sure of the licensing deals companies like Netflix have with the other studios for streaming their movies but I am almost certain the length of the contracts will not be long or will have clauses that will allow the original owners of the films to remove the right of companies like Netflix to stream their owned content.

If the industry gets that lucrative you will start to see the owners of the content streaming the movies themselves and not allowing any competition to have licensing rights to do the same.

It is my opinion that the major studios have allowed all these streaming businesses to come to fruition as they are building a potential lucrative future business model with no actual costs to the major studios.

Disney + is the only major studio I know of that is streaming their own content at the moment but expect more to follow. If Disney + manage to get a big subscriber base they will not permit any other company to show their owned content.

You may have an argument in relation to the desert island scenario. Not so sure all the lists by people will be similar.
Perhaps many will have maybe around a third or so of the same classic or masterpiece movie but I suspect many will be subjective especially with regards to the persons age.

I personally find that many cinema lovers seem to have a strong preference of movies they grew up on in their era over many more modern movies.

For example, I have noticed that many people who are now in their late 60's and into their 70's seem to favour movies from the 40's and 50's.

If you look at famous directors such as Spielberg, Lucas and Scorsese they seem to think that movies form the 50's are the best of any era. Maybe they are correct and maybe they are not but I am sure many younger cinema lovers will disagree and have their own opinions.

Although I do think some people give far too much importance to video quality it is an important aspect nevertheless.

I think I commented somewhere that the streaming businesses will continue to lower the quality of the streams until enough people notice it and decide to make their feelings known on the issue.

It seems as though the physical media v streaming outlook will continue to get people very emotional and will be a constant debate going forward.

I still collect physical media and will continue to do so and still will not adopt to streaming movies.

It is still my conviction that physical media will become more expensive going forward. They do not have much room to go any lower in my opinion and demand is obviously reducing at an accelerated rate.

I am still amazed at how many labels are out there producing discs of such a high quality. My original thoughts on a lot of companies going bankrupt have not changed and I think we will see a few go under in the next couple of years or so.
 
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TJPC

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To me, streaming is only for something I want to watch once and probably never look at again. The idea of “owning” a movie that you can watch on line is totally unreal to me. I need the physical disc. I have many free movies I have on line that I received when I bought the Blu ray. I have never watched any. To buy a movie on line reminds me of the star we bought for my father years ago. The company gave co-ordinates etc. and he supposedly owned it!
 

rich_d

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Not sure your opinions offer much thought on my observations.

Firstly, I only used Mulan as an argument for demanding a high fee to watch a movie "on demand" as it was the most recent and notable at the time I posted it. There are many other movies you could use as an example where this business model has been used.

Although I am not aware of any data published on cinema ticket sales I don't think a vast majority are families taking many for a birthday party. I would presume many are sold in pairs or maybe perhaps in single form so arguing that many are watching streamed films on demand to save money or the hassle of travelling to the cinema seems fairly weak as I see it. With a film like Mulan perhaps but not films in general.

It would also depend on location dynamics as some areas it is convenient to visit the cinema and others inconvenient depending on distance from the home and lack of public transport etc. Many variables to consider.

The reason I mentioned Mulan was to highlight the trend of streaming businesses raising their prices for their services and that is why it is important to "why I own so many movies" because in time it will prove to be a cheaper and more convenient hobby as opposed to streaming.

Have not most of the streaming businesses raised their prices lately? Disney + and Netflix being two examples. Not by much I know but gradualism is always an efficient mechanism to get people to accept any changes without much opposition. The streaming companies have been losing a lot of money since their inception and it is always a useful tool to get mass adoption by offering a "cheaper than it actually costs to provide the service" type of model to begin with.

You also have the problem of when the industry or "if" the industry starts making high net profits of the content owners providing their own service.

Not sure of the licensing deals companies like Netflix have with the other studios for streaming their movies but I am almost certain the length of the contracts will not be long or will have clauses that will allow the original owners of the films to remove the right of companies like Netflix to stream their owned content.

If the industry gets that lucrative you will start to see the owners of the content streaming the movies themselves and not allowing any competition to have licensing rights to do the same.

It is my opinion that the major studios have allowed all these streaming businesses to come to fruition as they are building a potential lucrative future business model with no actual costs to the major studios.

Disney + is the only major studio I know of that is streaming their own content at the moment but expect more to follow. If Disney + manage to get a big subscriber base they will not permit any other company to show their owned content.

You may have an argument in relation to the desert island scenario. Not so sure all the lists by people will be similar.
Perhaps many will have maybe around a third or so of the same classic or masterpiece movie but I suspect many will be subjective especially with regards to the persons age.

I personally find that many cinema lovers seem to have a strong preference of movies they grew up on in their era over many more modern movies.

For example, I have noticed that many people who are now in their late 60's and into their 70's seem to favour movies from the 40's and 50's.

If you look at famous directors such as Spielberg, Lucas and Scorsese they seem to think that movies form the 50's are the best of any era. Maybe they are correct and maybe they are not but I am sure many younger cinema lovers will disagree and have their own opinions.

Although I do think some people give far too much importance to video quality it is an important aspect nevertheless.

I think I commented somewhere that the streaming businesses will continue to lower the quality of the streams until enough people notice it and decide to make their feelings known on the issue.

It seems as though the physical media v streaming outlook will continue to get people very emotional and will be a constant debate going forward.

I still collect physical media and will continue to do so and still will not adopt to streaming movies.

It is still my conviction that physical media will become more expensive going forward. They do not have much room to go any lower in my opinion and demand is obviously reducing at an accelerated rate.

I am still amazed at how many labels are out there producing discs of such a high quality. My original thoughts on a lot of companies going bankrupt have not changed and I think we will see a few go under in the next couple of years or so.

You wrote:

Disney + is the only major studio I know of that is streaming their own content at the moment but expect more to follow. If Disney + manage to get a big subscriber base they will not permit any other company to show their owned content.

Hopefully, you meant to write something else as obviously Disney + has already surpassed 100 million subscribers. Industry analysts were debating how many years it would take Disney to reach 30 million subscribers just a year ago. Additionally, WarnerMedia is streaming brand new content on the same day they are released in theaters. Paramount + is streaming their content as well. You may not consider Netflix or Amazon to be major studios, but in this period of major studio consolidation, that's a difference without a distinction.

You wrote: I personally find that many cinema lovers seem to have a strong preference of movies they grew up on in their era over many more modern movies.

For example, I have noticed that many people who are now in their late 60's and into their 70's seem to favour movies from the 40's and 50's.

If you look at famous directors such as Spielberg, Lucas and Scorsese they seem to think that movies form the 50's are the best of any era. Maybe they are correct and maybe they are not but I am sure many younger cinema lovers will disagree and have their own opinions.

If you truly meant "cinema lovers" versus 'film lovers,' someone that just turned 70 was born in 1951. Their "era" was hardly the 40s (which pre-dates them) or the 50s which they left when they were nine years old. Consider how many polls have Hitchcock's Rear Window (1954) or Vertigo (1958) as all-time favorites. Yet, someone who is 70 didn't see Vertigo when they were seven. And because of contractual issues, never saw either of these films in re-release (or on TV) until 1983. Yet, they are still beloved.

Sure, someone is going to have a special place in their heart for that film, actor or actress that they loved as a teen. But, in my view, films resonate regardless of era. It might be Nick Charles explaining to some bartenders how to make a martini in The Thin Man, or a certain bowler hat in the film Goldfinger, a large boulder starting to move in Raiders of the Lost Ark, or it might be the tunnel scene in 8 1/2 (which I only saw as an adult) or a Blue Lady whispering "Silencio" in Mulholland Dr.

Enjoy what you want to enjoy without apology. Videos (a.k.a.. inventory) sitting on a shelf are cash in the wrong form. That's just me stating the obvious. However, as long as your collection isn't forcing you to live in a van, down by the river, it's all good.
 

Mysto

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You wrote:

Disney + is the only major studio I know of that is streaming their own content at the moment but expect more to follow. If Disney + manage to get a big subscriber base they will not permit any other company to show their owned content.

Hopefully, you meant to write something else as obviously Disney + has already surpassed 100 million subscribers. Industry analysts were debating how many years it would take Disney to reach 30 million subscribers just a year ago. Additionally, WarnerMedia is streaming brand new content on the same day they are released in theaters. Paramount + is streaming their content as well. You may not consider Netflix or Amazon to be major studios, but in this period of major studio consolidation, that's a difference without a distinction.

You wrote: I personally find that many cinema lovers seem to have a strong preference of movies they grew up on in their era over many more modern movies.

For example, I have noticed that many people who are now in their late 60's and into their 70's seem to favour movies from the 40's and 50's.


If you look at famous directors such as Spielberg, Lucas and Scorsese they seem to think that movies form the 50's are the best of any era. Maybe they are correct and maybe they are not but I am sure many younger cinema lovers will disagree and have their own opinions.

If you truly meant "cinema lovers" versus 'film lovers,' someone that just turned 70 was born in 1951. Their "era" was hardly the 40s (which pre-dates them) or the 50s which they left when they were nine years old. Consider how many polls have Hitchcock's Rear Window (1954) or Vertigo (1958) as all-time favorites. Yet, someone who is 70 didn't see Vertigo when they were seven. And because of contractual issues, never saw either of these films in re-release (or on TV) until 1983. Yet, they are still beloved.

Sure, someone is going to have a special place in their heart for that film, actor or actress that they loved as a teen. But, in my view, films resonate regardless of era. It might be Nick Charles explaining to some bartenders how to make a martini in The Thin Man, or a certain bowler hat in the film Goldfinger, a large boulder starting to move in Raiders of the Lost Ark, or it might be the tunnel scene in 8 1/2 (which I only saw as an adult) or a Blue Lady whispering "Silencio" in Mulholland Dr.

Enjoy what you want to enjoy without apology. Videos (a.k.a.. inventory) sitting on a shelf are cash in the wrong form. That's just me stating the obvious. However, as long as your collection isn't forcing you to live in a van, down by the river, it's all good.
I don't want to play in your guys argument (discussion) but I'm 76 and I saw Rear Window at the theater as a kid (still remember it). - You guys carry on.
Cheers
 

rich_d

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Not that anyone on this forum "needs" any kind of intervention,






there is nothing ever wrong in wanting a correct presentation

From the video ...

"I love owning all this stuff."

Yes, yes you do.

I wonder if any of these guys have had a recent interaction with a female that hasn't involved a credit card. ;)
 

Mysto

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From the video ...

"I love owning all this stuff."

Yes, yes you do.

I wonder if any of these guys have had a recent interaction with a female that hasn't involved a credit card. ;)
So many answers come to mind :rolling-smiley:
 

The Drifter

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Funny video. I can see owning a lot of DVD's & Blu-ray's. I do, but not nearly as many as these guys. And, most of mine are in plastic binders, which saves on space.

If I were these guys, I would be concerned about getting my collection ripped off. That's a lot to lose.
 

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