Why don't more manufacturers add a "squeeze" mode on analog sets?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by TimG, Aug 21, 2002.

  1. TimG

    TimG Second Unit

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    Just curious as to why more analog sets don't have a "squeeze mode"? As mentioned in another thread, everyone I have talked to that bought Sony sets, did so because of the "squeeze" option on them. It just seems like the others are missing out on a lot of sales to Sony because of this. Does it add that much to the cost? Or do they just figure most of the buying public don't care and watch pan-n-scan anyway so why bother? Just interested in some opinions.

    TimG
     
  2. Brent Hutto

    Brent Hutto Supporting Actor

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    A couple of reasons come to mind. First of all, the majority of people who you've talked to who bought Sony sets probably would have bought Sony anyway, for one reason or another. Secondly, the people you talk to are a highly selected subset of the people who buy TV sets. Keep in mind that 32" TV's are very, very high volume items.

    That leaves a lot of folks who wouldn't even think to set their DVD player to "16:9" when they don't have a putatively widescreen TV. In my experience, that includes most Circuit City or Best Buy sales people.

    Finally, I suspect that adding the squeeze in a reliable, user-friendly fashion isn't as easy as it looks. If it was something they could do for just the price of engineering a firmware revision, more manufacturers would do it notwithstanding any rationalizations. There must be more to it, especially using the Sony model of reformatting the whole raster area into a vertically narrower space. I rather suspect it's not just a coincidence that Sony does the squeeze on most sets and that Sony doesn't use a conventional aperture mask.

    Oh, and one other thing. They perceive themselves as having no particular interest in letting people buy a plain old 32" TV when they "ought" to be buying an expensive widescreen one.
     
  3. NickSo

    NickSo Producer

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    And frankly, most people dont care, as sad as that is [​IMG]
    They dont really need the 33% extra resolution they get with a squeezed anamorphic image rather than a downconverted one.
     
  4. jeff lam

    jeff lam Screenwriter

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    True, I would assume that most of the consumers that have bought sony wega TV's don't even use their squeeze mode because they don't understand it and they are too lazy to figure it out. Also, they love the letterbox picture so why change things? If only they knew what they were missing.
     
  5. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

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    In three separate cases involving co-workers who purchased 36-inch FV-series WEGAs, they did so simply because they wanted a "big-screen TV." These people had absolutely no idea what the 16:9 mode is nor why they would want or use it--and all three owned DVD players.

    Upon having the function explained to them--quite clearly--they were under the impression that the letterboxing would be even "more severe."
     
  6. TimG

    TimG Second Unit

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    Well, I kind of figured the responses would be along the lines they are, and unfortunately I agree. But the sets that do have the squeeze seem to be about the same price as the ones that don't, and it would be one more feature too tout about. I am in the market for one at the moment and it seems the only choices are Sony or one JVC model. We have a projector for movies and have one station that broadcasts High-Def. So it seemed like a good choice now to get an analog to watch normal tv on until a few yrs when HDTV gets going.

    TimG
     

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