Why does a TV need to be "burned in"?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Rick Hunter, Jun 19, 2001.

  1. Rick Hunter

    Rick Hunter Auditioning

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    I just bought a Wega 27FV16 and I'm thinking of making it into a little home theater for the bedroom. I'm really new to the audiophile hobby and appreciate everyone's two cents. I started playing around w/ the service menu and also used the Avia disk. When talking to a buddy of mine he mentioned that it's crucial to allow the set a "burn in" period before making any changes. I was always under the impression that this was completed by the manufacturer before the set was even boxed up. Also, if that's not the case then how long does a set need to be burned in?
    Thanks,
    Rick
     
  2. Allan Jayne

    Allan Jayne Cinematographer

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    Burn in at the factory is a several hour to a couple-of-days session where the TV is left turned on. The purpose is to catch defective parts under the generally true assumption that if a part is going to fail early, it will most likely do so within the first few hours of operation.
    I do not think a TV needs to be burned in at home but it should be on for at least a half hour before you try to calibrate it. It takes the half hour for the components inside to reach a stable operating temperature and convergence could drift during this warmup time and then settle down.
    Another form of burn-in, which you don't want, is the etching of indelible shadows on the picture tube because bright lines or lettering, etc. was stationary for long periods of time. To prevent this, turn the contrast down to well under halfway as soon as you turn on the set for the first time, preferably before connecting teh antenna and DVD player. Keep the contrast down there and work all of your other calibrations around that.
    Other video hints:http://members.aol.com/ajaynejr/video.htm
     
  3. VicRuiz

    VicRuiz Second Unit

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    Actually, the proper term is "break in", not "burn in". It is recommended to allow the TV at least 100 hours of break in time before making any advanced adjustments (like an ISF calibration). Calibration with AVIA or Video Essentials only is recommended during this time.
    Burn-in is the uneven wear of the CRT phosphor due to displaying stationary images at a high contrast level. Keeping the contrast and brightness at reasonable levels will prevent this from happening.
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    Vic Ruiz
    STOP HDCP/DFAST/5C
     
  4. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

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    That is correct.
    Further, you don't need to leave the display on for days at a time to break it in--phosphors start degrading from the moment the thing is switched on.
    Before making adjustments to the picture, do, as stated, let the set run for a minimum of thirty minutes to let it reach thermal stability. Any electronic device that needs more than an hour to reach thermal stability is probably defective (which puts the kibosh on what so many "high-end audio" pundits say about leaving an amplifier on for a day or two before doing any "critical listening").
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