why do different reciever makers use different volume scales?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by David_Stein, Mar 11, 2002.

  1. David_Stein

    David_Stein Second Unit

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    wouldnt it be easier if all manufacturers used a similar scale for their receivers' volumes?

    i hear people having their volume knobs at -20, or 00, or whatever. my receiver goes from 0 to 70. and then most are linear, right? yet my onkyo is logarithmic. what is the deal with all these different ways of doing things? it makes reading explainations written to other people so much harder to understand...

    i guess i just wish everyone's reciever went from 0 to 100 and that the number refered to the percent of max amplification of that particular reciever. things would be so much easier, but there has to be some reason, even if it is just makers trying to differentiate themselves...
     
  2. Vince Maskeeper

    Vince Maskeeper Producer

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    David,

    You'll find a lack of standardization dominates the HT world. Every manufacturer seeks to have their products be unique- and they all have their own logic in the way they do things.

    You'll find that receiver volume is certainly not the only confusing difference, heck it's not even the only confusing varation when it comes to receivers. When you start getting into display devices and even with speakers- specification and terminology gets criss crossed to the point of absolute nonsense. Add to this potent mix poorly trained and ignorant sales people- and it's no wonder people find home electronics confusing.

    But, I don't think there is an concrete answer to your question of "why". I guess it's one of those questions you can add to the various other questions of the ages...

    -Vince
     
  3. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

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    Some receivers that go from -xx to 0 tell you how close you are to the maximum rated power. (You can go beyond this, but with increased distortion and risk of over-heating).
    Some receivers show db numbers that tell you what the volume WOULD be with a "reference" speaker, measured 1 foot away directly in front. They cannot tell you what volume YOU get because you have different speakers & distance, but it's a good aproximation.
    Some receivers set 0 db to be "reference" level - the setting that would match a THX movie theater.
    All are valid. You just have to read your manual and learn what your equipment is trying to say.
    And when you think about it: there is NO reason they should be consistant.
    Suppose I told you my LFE output was set to -4 on my Yamaha receiver. What possible use is that information to you/anyone? This setting reflects my make/model of subwoofer, my room size, my seating distance, etc.
    This is why a SPL meter is critical to adjust your system - it takes into account all the variables for YOUR system.
    Does this help?
     
  4. Garrett Lundy

    Garrett Lundy Producer

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    Don't be fooled kids. Home Theater make look and sound impressive, But the seventy-quadbillion differant ways there are to take the movie from the shiny disk and get it into your head simply boggle the (at least my) mind.
    I almost look fondly back upon the time when to make something loud, you just turned it up to 11.[​IMG]
     

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