Why are we supposed to buy DLP and LCD TVs instead of CRT ones?!!!

Discussion in 'Displays' started by james e m, Jan 2, 2004.

  1. james e m

    james e m Second Unit

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    I've waited and waited for the new technologies to come out and I always leave the store unimpressed. Why are these technologies better than CRT? They look the same in the stores, so it's hard to justify spending the extra amount of money to my wife. I would at least settle for a noticbly wider viewing angle! Why does cable reception suck for these tvs? I feel like i'm ranting. Sorry, somebody set me straight.
    James
     
  2. Cees Alons

    Cees Alons Moderator
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    They are not "better". They are "different". And one of those differences is: when you try to make them really large, a CRT will become terribly heavy, with all the glass needed. So above a certain limit, you will no longer have CRT direct-view TVs.
    Another difference is: in practice those LCD-, DLP- and plasma-screens can be made flat more readily.

    Cees
     
  3. DennisK

    DennisK Agent

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    The other difference is LCD and Plasma do not suffer from burn in. This helps protect your investment if you plan to do things like gaming, watch 4:3 tv with black bars on either side on a 16:9 TV, or watch the same channel with a stationary logo for hours on end. While burn in risk is minimal on a properly calibrated tv, its still nice not to have to worry about it.
     
  4. Steve Schaffer

    Steve Schaffer Producer

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    Actually Plasma will suffer burn-in, DLP and LCD won't.

    Having had crt based rptv since '99 with no burn in (properly calibrated) it's a non-issue if you don't leave video games paused for hours on end.

    None of the new technologies can produce blacks as well as crt, all are much more expensive.

    All the buzz is about the DLP, LCD, and Plasma sets, but none can perform as well as a crt model as far as actual picture quality goes.

    If you must leave stationary images on your set for extended periods of time at maximum white level settings, then go for the new technology. If you want the best pq at a bargain price get a crt based set.
     
  5. ChrisWiggles

    ChrisWiggles Producer

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    They aren't. CRT still remains the picture-quality reference.

    For ease of use, big bright pictures, and light weight/smaller dimensions, then digitals are better for usability. But you sacrifice picture quality for that.
     
  6. Joseph Shaw

    Joseph Shaw Stunt Coordinator

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    DLP, LCD and Plasma are nice becuase with a VESA or DVI connector you can use them as computer monitors. Pixel based technologies like DLP and LCD will also have perfect geometry during their lifetime, unlike CRT.

    Plasma can burn in just like CRT. Plasma also uses an exceptional amount of power to run compared to the other technologies.

    DLP has a really hard time producing adequate black levels and the colors seem really washed out or unnaturally bright. It also suffers from aliasing in some instances. But I've seen the difference between successive chipsets, and it seems to get better with every generation, though I'd still pick CRT over it any day.

    I'm really looking forward to what LCOS will bring to the table. The 82" Mitsubishi set is LCOS, and had the salesman not told me I would have assumed it was CRT because the picture looks that good. It's a behemoth though. Intel is looking to take a piece out of TI with their new LCOS chipset set to be announced in January, as well as other segments of the display markets. Analysts expect Intel's entry to drop current average prices for big screen HD capable displays by 1/3 over the next year. Something tells me that 3rd-4th quarter next year will be a great time to buy a display if you're looking to upgrade.
     
  7. james e m

    james e m Second Unit

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    Thanks guys for all the input, I appreciate it. Besides plasma, will the viewing angle get any bigger with the new technologies?

    James
     
  8. Dan McKevitt

    Dan McKevitt Auditioning

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    James - the horizontal viewing angle for the LCD and DLP RPTVs will be much better than standard RPTVs. However, the vertical viewing angle remains terrible - not a big deal when it's in your home properly mounted. If you're walking through one of the big box stores, the sets are typically mounted at a seated viewing height, and many of the passers-by seem unimpressed from a standing position...
     
  9. Jeff W.

    Jeff W. Stunt Coordinator

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    I have to agree. None of these new technologies are yet ready for prime time.

    Plasma - nice viewing angles, bright, but no 1080i and too expensive.

    LCD - dark, crappy viewing angles, no 1080 and expensive.

    DLP - no 1080 and expensive. also people with sensitive eyesight can not look at them? They make me nauseous.
     
  10. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

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    The standard television signal was adopted in the 1940's and has not changed much since.

    You are taking a 1940's technology, running through a cable system that compresses/un-compresses the signal and you are displaying the results on a television that is fairly state-of-the-art in 2000.

    This is like taking a mono 45 rpm that you used to listen to on the "Close and Play" when you were a kid, and playing it on a modern 5 channel stereo system - lots of hiss/crackle/noise.

    It's not the equipment, it's the material you are feeding it.

    Note: One of the features of the Samsung DLP televisions is a circuit made by Faroudja. This circuit actually does a decent job with ordinary 480 video (standard television) and upconverting it to progressive. It's so good, that people with Progressive Scan DVD players have learned to NOT feed the television the progressive feed. Giving the Interlace video to the television produces a better picture because of the Faroudja circuit.

    So if you watch a lot of standard television, look at the Samsung DLP units.

    Note 2: televisions on the display floor are set at the factory to 'Torch' mode to produce a brighter/high contrast picture to catch your eye. This can wash out parts of the picture and remove detail.

    Try this: find the higher-end stores and ask them to show you the televisions that have been calibrated. These are usually in a demo room with low-light similar to your room in the evening. This will show you the potential of HDTV properly setup. Most of the other HDTV's will look as good once you get it home and properly adjusted. Check out the "Display Devices" for advice on calibration.
     
  11. Carlo Medina

    Carlo Medina Executive Producer

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    Count me in as another who is excited about LCoS. Multiple companies (Philips and Intel being the biggest I've heard) have developed a low-cost 1980-1080 single LCoS chip--that's 1080p from what I'm reading, not 1080i! They're calling E-HD (don't know what "E" stands for - enhanced?) resolution.

    These are designed for 40" and larger RPTVs. Philips had a 60+" prototype that I saw [and no, it's not the one that's on sale right now, it is using the new 1920x1080p prototype chip] and believe me, it matches or surpasses every CRT RPTVs I've seen.

    Analysts are predicting that within a year of mass-market launch (late 2004 launch, so late 2005) the prices for large LCoS RPTVs should fall below the "magic" $2000 mark. That is the point at which I will be upgrading my set (starting to save up already, will be ready come '06!). Definitely plan on staying away from early-adopting LCoS as, with any new technology, there will be growing pains and a learning curve. But in a couple of years, I will be primed to buy one.
     

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