Why are "spaghetti westerns" called as such?

Patrick Sun

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This has always bothered me in that I don't know where the term "spaghetti western" came to describe that genre of film. Does anyone know?
 

RobertR

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Simple. "Spaghetti westerns" were made by Italian directors. Spaghetti is an Italian dish. Hence the term.
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[Edited last by RobertR on September 16, 2001 at 06:30 PM]
 

alan halvorson

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Well, they're made mainly by Italian directors and, you know, pasta is rather popular in Italy and so .....
I really don't know if this is it but it seems like a good guess.
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[Edited last by alan halvorson on September 16, 2001 at 06:30 PM]
 

Robert Crawford

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Below is a pretty good definition of "spaghetti western":
A dimissive name for the blood-spattered Italian imitations of American westerns which became popular in the 60's, using such actors as Lee Van Cleef and Clint Eastwood. They gained in international reputation and incidentally made Eastwood into a star through the work of Sergio Leone in the mid-60's, beginning with his "A Fistfull of Dollars". Leone orchestrated the action around dramatic close-ups, with a slow build to moments of extreme action, to the accompaniment of Ennio Morricone's plangent, percussive music. Eastwood set the pattern for the protagonist: a taciturn, laconic wanderer who was deadly with a gun. While he was "the man with no name", other recurring heroes of the genre were Santana, Django and Ringo.
Crawdaddy
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Edwin Pereyra

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Spaghetti westerns took off in the 1960’s. Europe had a hard time getting American western films, so they decided to make their own. These films were usually more violent than their American counterpart. Sergio Leone was best known for the creation of these films (i.e. A Fistful Of Dollars, Once Upon A Time In The West, The Good The Bad and The Ugly, etc.).
~Edwin
Oops, Crawdaddy beat me to it.
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http://www.hometheaterforum.com/uub/Forum9/HTML/005780.html#8
[Edited last by Edwin Pereyra on September 16, 2001 at 06:59 PM]
 

James D S

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And ironically, the 'spaghetti westerns' that created the term, FAFDM, FFOD, and GB&U, were shot in Spain.
 

Peter Kline

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They were filmed in Italy, which substituted for the American west. I suppose if they were made in China they'd be called "Noodle" Westerns.

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