Why are most "special edition" CD's released outside the U.S.?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Clint B, Jan 19, 2003.

  1. Clint B

    Clint B Second Unit

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    I'm certainly not ragging on anyone or their country here, but I have never seen a CD that was a "special edition" of some kind (usually meaning that it has extra tracks, an additional live CD, etc.) that originated from the U.S. Citing two examples, I have the European edition of Pearl Jam's "Ten" album, which has two or three extra tracks that aren't on the U.S. album; I also have the Australian edition of Sheryl Crow's second (self-titled) album, which has two extra tracks AND a live E.P. Are there any CD's that have a similar setup that originate form the U.S.? It would be nice not to have to pay "import" prices for CD's like this! Thanks for your help.
     
  2. Yee-Ming

    Yee-Ming Producer

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    my guess is either the local licensees are trying to distinguish their product to discourage parallel imports of cheaper US discs, or they feel the need to give us foreigners something special in marketing the product, whereas they feel US customers are willing to buy on the merits themselves.

    I sometimes wish R3 DVD makers would do the same thing, if anything it's the other way around, R1 discs are both cheaper (online) AND have more features. big minus both ways, in my book.
     
  3. Paul D Young

    Paul D Young Second Unit

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    Those editions are "special" to us, but I believe most of them are normal editions in their respective countries.
    Why do they get it and we don't though? That is my question. Yee-Ming's theory sounds pretty good though.

    Once in a while we do get versions of albums with extra tracks of bands that are popular in the UK and not so much here. Snow Patrol comes to mind (I told you they weren't popular). They had about 4 or 5 UK b-sides at the end of their US debut. And "The Wannadies" by The Wannadies (from Sweden) took off two old tracks and added three older ones.

    But my Baby Chaos "Love Your Self Abuse" took off 3 UK tracks and added a remix of an old song and two brand new songs forcing THEM to by the US import for a change. (But I still had to buy the import to get the original songs.)

    So I guess it works both ways.
     
  4. Scott Ware

    Scott Ware Stunt Coordinator

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    Yee-Ming is correct. Different countries will get more tracks because usually, it is cheaper to import a US disk than it is to buy their version. Extra tracks is the label's way of discouraging importing. The extra tracks are usually just remixes/ B-sides/ songs from a soundtrack, so it's usually cheaper to simply buy the US version, along with a single/ soundtrack that contains what the Japanese/ European version has than it is to import.
     
  5. Seth_L

    Seth_L Screenwriter

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  6. Yee-Ming

    Yee-Ming Producer

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    hmmm, I hadn't thought about the pirate versions, probably because I don't buy many CDs anymore, and in any case have never bought a pirated CD (though I will confess to a few pirate VCDs...:b )

    as Seth points out, bonus tracks, or even bonus discs of remixes or videos (on VCD) are ways for original licensees to distinguish their product, especially if the pirate copied the "vanilla" US version.

    I've seen many CDs packaged with a VCD of a concert performance by the artiste here in Asia; e.g. Sheryl Crow's CD was sold with a VCD of her performance here at Hard Rock Cafe.
     
  7. Seth_L

    Seth_L Screenwriter

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  8. Anthony Hom

    Anthony Hom Supporting Actor

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    Aren't the way songs copyrighted different in the US than the rest of the world?
    For example, in UK, a single album has one copyright rate, while in the US, the copyright is based on per song, not per album. That would motivate US CD makers to put less songs per albums, so they would have to pay less royalties.
     
  9. Seth_L

    Seth_L Screenwriter

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    I don't think so Anthony. Besides, in most cases the label owns the copyright, not the artist anyhow. So I'm not sure how they would be saving money. I suspect it also might have something to do with foreign consumers not buying 38 minute CDs, whereas the American public will.

    Seth
     
  10. JimChan

    JimChan Stunt Coordinator

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