1. One of the perks of the Samsung DLP sets is that they have an RGB (VGA?) port for PC connections.

    I found this quote in a Samsung review:

    "Probably the best picture I get comes from DVDs from the HTPC. Oddly, even low-cost PC's can output a clearly superior picture from a DVD than can even the most expensive dedicated DVD player. Go figure."

    Can someone explain why HTPCs are better DVD players?

    The whole PC/TV thing smacks of the Gateway Destination thing from years gone by.

    Is anyone doing this now? How's it working for you?
     
  2. Matthew Todd

    Matthew Todd Second Unit

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2000
    Messages:
    338
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I'm using an HTPC, as I'm sure many others are too. I'm using it to feed RGBHV (VGA) to a CRT front projector.

    I think the big advantage of the HTPC is that it is a built in scalar. I output my DVDs at 1280x720, which gives a nice smooth picture when it's that big (84" wide).

    Someone could probably explain better, but I think using an HTPC takes advantage of the mass market of computers, and high quality, relatively inexpensive video cards (I'm using a Radeon 9000) to do the scaling.

    Matt
     
  3. Sami Kallio

    Sami Kallio Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2004
    Messages:
    1,035
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    What cables/connectors are you using? I'm currently connecting my computer through SVHS and I don't have DVI on the CRT projector. Video Card is Radeon 9800 Pro AIW.
     
  4. Sami Kallio

    Sami Kallio Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2004
    Messages:
    1,035
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Looks like the 9800AIW came with DVI-to-component adapter, I will have to check if it was there...

    I would think it converts to true component signal so the PQ would be a lot better than with SVHS.
     
  5. Matthew Todd

    Matthew Todd Second Unit

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2000
    Messages:
    338
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    If your connecting to the display with just s-video, you're limiting the resolution to 720x480i.

    My Radeon has a DVI out, but I haven't used it, as my CRT doesn't have a DVI input.

    If you have a digital projector with a DVI input, that is what I'd use. Depending on the display, either DVI or RGBHV is going to look best.

    I use a VGA cable out from the Radeon video card, and then into an Extron 202 Plus interface. Then I run RGBHV out from the Extron to the projector. The Extron gives me a little more control over the image. I plan to swap the Extron for a Mike Parker modded video card sometime down the road.

    You can run a simple cable with VGA on one end and 5 BNC (RGBHV) on the other end, right into the projector. As long as the cable run is short, that's not going to be a problem.

    Matt
     
  6. Sami Kallio

    Sami Kallio Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2004
    Messages:
    1,035
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Matthew, what is the resolution that your CRT supports? I have a Seleco SVP-350 with 7" tubes so I think I'm already limited to that resolution.
     
  7. Ralph B

    Ralph B Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2003
    Messages:
    584
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    would this hold true to the xbox as a dvd player? people say it stinks but hooked up to my Wega HDTV via component cables it looks great! i mean it is a computer and running through a video car....no ? just a thought. dont know why people say the xbox stinks as a dvd player. maybe my sony tv is helping the picture quality.

    I hooked my pc up to my projector and it kills my standalone!!!!!!! dont know why they cant do this with a standalone unit.?
     
  8. Matthew Todd

    Matthew Todd Second Unit

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2000
    Messages:
    338
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Sami, I'm using an Ampro 3600 8" EM focus CRT. I can still make out scan lines at 720p, but I haven't fiddled much with it to see how high I could take it. In any case, the picture at 720p is very nice.

    Do you know what the scan rate capability of the Seleco is? I bet that it would at least support 480p (32KHz).

    I've had an Ampro 2000D (7" ES focus CRT) that I fed 720p. It was maybe a bit soft, but not too bad. It probably would look best maybe just a little lower than that.

    I'm betting that you can probably feed your Seleco some resolutions that are at least a little higher. Do you have any specifications on it?

    Matt
     
  9. Have to say, I'm a little put off regarding the whole HTPC thing after reading this quote...that and a HTPC is bound to cost more than a decent DVD player:

    "Connecting an HDTV with a DVI input to a PC with a DVI output is not as easy as you may think. HDTV manufacturers don't exactly encourage this generally and don't always publish enough information to determine before buying (or after buying for that matter) what video resolutions and what horizontal and vertical frequency specifications they require. This is a shame since video card manufacturers are very good about this. There's not a lot of support from the manufacturing community at this point and plenty of HDCP and sync issues to muck things up even more."
     
  10. ChrisWiggles

    ChrisWiggles Producer

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2002
    Messages:
    4,791
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    HTPC can be complicated, but the goal is not so much beating entry level DVD players (they do that easily) but replacing the need for high-end video processors which can cost upwards of $20,000. this they do as well, for far far less. And now there's all sorts of crazy integration and automation things you can do with a PC. If you take the time to learn how to do it right, it is superior.
     
  11. ChrisWiggles

    ChrisWiggles Producer

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2002
    Messages:
    4,791
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Because many video sources, including DVD, have limited resolution, blowing it up really big, say for front projection, looks like crap on CRT devices, because the resolution is too low and you get horribly scan line visibility. On digital devices, there has to be scaling going on to hit the native pixel count of the projector, and usually this processing is relatively basic. To do it well takes a lot of computing power, hence the use for computers. basically, when you select video resolutions on your video card, you are changing the output resolution. Get a solid computer and video card, and you can play DVDs directly, or use a capture card to input video from other sources, then the computer scales the video to a resolution you select, and outputs it to your display. This is the same function performed by outboard processors. The benefit is twofold:

    1) On CRT devices, they just display what they are given. (some have built-in scalers, but usually not as good). So you can tailor the output resolution to hit the sweetspot of your projector and setup, which will vary, even among identical projectors.

    2) On digital projectors, if you use outboard, high quality scaling/processing, and input *exactly* the native panel resolution, it will bypass the internal scaling, and you will get higher video quality by using a higher quality external scaler.
     

Share This Page