Which causes more/faster hearing loss

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Andrus_R, Mar 10, 2003.

  1. Andrus_R

    Andrus_R Stunt Coordinator

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    High or Low frequency sounds? Errr that didn't come out well... I mean to say people are more tolerant to HIGH spl bass vs high spl high pitched sounds.

    So natually sub causes more hearing loss eh?

    ...
     
  2. TimForman

    TimForman Supporting Actor

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    I don't believe that frequency has much to do with damage to your hearing as does the decibel level and the length of time you're exposed. As a point of reference, if you're at work and constantly exposed to db levels above 85 your employer has to inform you of the dangers. If the db level is above 90 your employer must provide ear protection. I suppose since subs are generally built to create some pretty high db levels they might be considered more "hazardous". One rule of thumb is; If it hurts, turn it down.
     
  3. Mark Fitzsimmons

    Mark Fitzsimmons Supporting Actor

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    Anyone know what an average rock concert would be?

    I think I am going to be deaf. I saw Mudvayne live this weekend, and it was at least 120db. 4 bands, like 5 hours total, about 20 minutes between bands. It was the loudest concert I have ever been to.
     
  4. Brian Bunge

    Brian Bunge Producer

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    I'll let you know after the Summer Sanitarium tour hits Atlanta in July! [​IMG]
     
  5. Mark Fitzsimmons

    Mark Fitzsimmons Supporting Actor

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    Hehe, Sanitarium hits the stadium at The Ohio State University in July. I'll be there [​IMG]

    9 rows back [​IMG]
     
  6. Christopher M

    Christopher M Stunt Coordinator

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    After my first concert, and not being able to hear properly for the next day from one ear, I'm more cautious. I always take, or buy ear plugs at concerts. I just don't want to do any more damage. Plus, I still have no problems hearing/feeling the music, or talking to anyone. It definitly cuts down the sound though.

    Murdock
     
  7. ThomasW

    ThomasW Cinematographer

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    Hearing damage is cumulative.

    'Threshold shift' is actually what causes permanent damage. This is where the cell walls of the tympanic membrane change shape after exposure to high SPLS. Over a period of time (usually 6-8hrs) they return to 'approximately' the same shape prior to exposure. But each time they 'shift' they become more and more permanently misshaped. The end result is tinnitus and permanent hearing loss.
     
  8. ThomasW

    ThomasW Cinematographer

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  9. Joel X

    Joel X Stunt Coordinator

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    For concerts earplugs are the best! I personally like the reusable type that are made from rubber because they can be easily adjusted to very deep for the bad songs and then pulled out more for the good ones. When I leave I like my ears to be just beginning to ring. One other side effect of this type is that you can basically use them as an EQ. since they do a very good job of knocking down the higher pitches that are usually where most of the dB's are, probably due to the fact bass is more expensive...
     
  10. Bryan Michael

    Bryan Michael Supporting Actor

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    is that a osha thing the 85/90 db i have mesured 85 dm levels at my work. and it gets much louder too.
     
  11. BruceD

    BruceD Screenwriter

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    Remember, the OSHA rules are based on specific SPL dB levels in a specific frequency range (the "A" weighting scale) over time that does not include bass frequencies.


    So, measuring with an "A" scale and a "C" scale will likely give quite different results when measuring dB SPL levels of music.

    I find my "C" scale measurements (which include bass frequencies) to frequently have a 10dB higher SPL measurement than the "A" scale when measuring music.
     
  12. TimForman

    TimForman Supporting Actor

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  13. Brian Knauss

    Brian Knauss Stunt Coordinator

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    Mudvayne? Summer Sanitarium? Puh-lease... go to a Slayer concert!

    I know from personal experience that my ears ring after prolonged exposure to high frequencies. I was about 15 feet from a stack at a Dream Theater concert once where the guitar was blaring out of... my ears rang well into the next day. Didn't help with the lead singer's high pitched vocals either.
     
  14. Wes Nance

    Wes Nance Stunt Coordinator

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    You guys really need to be careful. I think if you were all gradually going blind you'd be more concerned, wouldn't you? Wow, I make my living playing in an orchestra, and if my hearing is permantly damaged, that's it.

    I have some high frequency hearing loss in one hear from ear infections as a child, so I'm quite protective of the other. That said, I've had ringing after playing in front of a monitor for a pops show, so there are times that I should have been wearing plugs.

    For plugs, I would recommend "musician" type plugs, which are more expensive, but knock the db levels down over the whole audio spectrum more or less evenly, depending on the quality of the plug. So you don't have that stuffy, no top end sound- the music sounds normal, just 20 db or so softer. You can get some that run around $20, or pay closer to $150 to $200 for custom fit plugs.

    Just my two cents. . .

    Wes
     
  15. Chris Tsutsui

    Chris Tsutsui Screenwriter

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    I think I know what causes the most hearing damage.

    It would be the fairly high pitched 2,500hz sine wave. The reasoning is because it is the natural resonance frequency of our ear canal which would cause an increase in SPL.

    You also figure that higher frequencies involves more rapid percussions on our ear drum than lows.

    Don't quote me on the 2,500hz as I'm trying to remember what was on the physics test. I know it's greater than 500hz.
     
  16. TimForman

    TimForman Supporting Actor

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    It could be whatever the frequency of a screaming child is. I've come across parents that clearly can't hear that one. [​IMG]
     
  17. Wes Nance

    Wes Nance Stunt Coordinator

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    I've measured my kids at around 115 to 120db when they're really screaming close to you!!

    Wes
     
  18. Allen Ross

    Allen Ross Supporting Actor

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    my first concert was a Red Hot Chili Peppers and The Foo Fighters opened for them, i was down on the floor for the Foo Fighters but i couldn't take the pit for the Peppers, so i enhjoyed the show from the stands

    I have to say Tools show is by far the most enjoyable show i have seen i have seen them 3 times and each time in a different listening place, the first was down on the floor almost at the gates, at the end i was 3rd back, really sweet.

    the second show i was up in the seats and had a good view but not great acousitics, i heard the rattleing of the walls more then then band

    and the last time i was down on the floor and i was dead center about 30 feet back right inbetween the stacks. i have to say i never smiles so much, my goal in my audio experance is to get the bass a such levels so my pants and my shirt is visably shaking. my tempest can get that way on the low end but it can't really handle the bass drum like i would like it too, be it another sub, this time sealed. or two mains with 15" sound reinforcement drivers, i am going to get these levels, just to feel my clothes move
     

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