Which amp for 4 sets of 2 in-ceiling speakers?

Discussion in 'AV Receivers' started by Alec M, Jul 4, 2002.

  1. Alec M

    Alec M Agent

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    I'm in the planning stages of building a house, and am putting 2 speakers in the living room, dining room, kitchen/nook and patio. Can I get one amp to run from the pre-amp outs of my Denon 3300 to run all this ok?

    Any suggestions for in-ceiling speakers to match?
     
  2. Bob Wilson

    Bob Wilson Agent

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    Why not buy a Niles multichannel amp that is designed for teh purpose. You would connect it to the tape out jacks not the pre out jacks and use volume controls wired into each room to control the volume or to turn off the sound in a room.I am using a Niles for 6 pairs of in wall or ceiling speakers. There are a number of good in wall or ceiling speakers depending on one's budget and taste. I am using B&W inside and mirage outside.
     
  3. Alec M

    Alec M Agent

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    That is a good suggestion, but needing an amp in addition to the switcher is out of my budget.

    The Russound CA 6.4 seems like a good fit however. Does anyone have any experience with these?

    If so, do you know if you can bridge 2 channels for 40 W to one speaker? (ie zone 5 L with zone 6 L, and 5R & 6R)
     
  4. Todd Hochard

    Todd Hochard Cinematographer

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    Alec,
    I use the multi-outs of my AVR-3300 to an AudioSource Amp Two (80w/Channel, stable to 2 ohms, $249 from www.jandr.com). I have the output of the amp wired to the input of a 4 channel speaker selector box (Niles, $69 from jandr.com, also), and from there out to 3 sets of in-walls (soon to be 4 sets, when I install my porch speakers next week).
    The multi-out jacks of the Denon are controlled by an internal volume, so that solves that issue. Additionally, this allows me to watch DVD in the living room, while watching/listening to VHS/ReplayTV in the bedroom, at the same time, or vice versa. The speaker selector box allows me to turn on only the rooms I want (I have the speakers in all bedrooms, so this is important), AND it has overload protection, so that the amp doesn't "see" too low impedance. Lastly, the Amp Two has an auto-on feature, such that it will turn on automatically, when an input becomes present. It turns off automatically after 10 minutes of silence- you don't need to mess with it.
    That's probably the cheapest, flexible solution you'll find, IMO. The Amp Two is a real workhorse of an amp.
    Todd
     
  5. Mike Marino

    Mike Marino Auditioning

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    Todd, your solution sounds like exactly what i'm looking for as well. One question - what do you mean by "multi-out jacks of the Denon are controlled by an internal volume, so that solves that issue" - do you use the master volume on the receiver to control the volume on the remote speakers? I assume this solution means one volume level for all switched-on pairs of speakers, no?

    I'm looking to put 4 pairs of in-ceiling speakers in a large kitchen/LR area, and all would be using the same source (CD/Tuner) at all times, so a single volume control would be ok. I could switch off a pair of speakers if that area waranted (say over the table during dinner). Do I have this right?

    Thanks, Mike
     
  6. skip marr

    skip marr Stunt Coordinator

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    I built our home 2 years ago and we did whole house audio - speakers in the ceiling in the kitchen, family room, and outside. We hid the receiver and CD player in the pantry. It is an entry level HK. The format is laid out as one feed to each set, with a managing volume control for each set in each room. That way, you simply turn on the receiver, put the volume at about 11 o'clock, then manage the sound level with each set of volume controls. It works great and will blow you out of the room if you turn up the independent controls past 2 o'clock. Configuring the system this way saves you a lot of $$. You do not need the independent amps and controls from Niles. Just use a good receiver and you will be fine.

    Good luck!!
     
  7. Brian Corr

    Brian Corr Supporting Actor

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    I'd recommend putting in volume controls in each room where you are going to have in-ceiling speakers, just so you aren't limited to the same volume in all of those rooms. Then you could set the 2nd zone volume on the Denon to the max you would ever want, and adjust each pair individually from their respective volume control. Patio speakers will usually need a little more volume anyway than a pair that is inside.

    Then add something like the audiosource amp and a switcher and you are set. You could skip the switcher if you use impedance matched volume controls, but the switcher's are nice because you can turn off pairs of speakers without having to run to that room and turn the volume control all the way down.
     

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