Where to get original Harry Potter novels?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by cafink, Jul 6, 2002.

  1. cafink

    cafink Producer

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    Carl Fink
    I'm something of a fan of J.K. Rowling's popular Harry Potter novels. I'm also something of a purist, and the small changes made to the American versions of these fine books has always bothered me.

    I'd like to order the original versions. Can anyone recommend a good place to order from?

    Also, what exactly is an "adult edition"? I've seen it mentioned on a few Harry Potter websites but I'm not sure what it is.
     
  2. Jeff Kleist

    Jeff Kleist Executive Producer

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    amazon.co.uk will ship them to you, you can even use your existing amazon account
     
  3. Thik Nongyow

    Thik Nongyow Stunt Coordinator

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    I do not see the changes as "a little," I see numerous changes in the Harry Potter books. British terms and phrases are changed to American equivalents and to purists that is unacceptable. The changes are misleading as most of the characters are from the U.K., and altering some of their dialog would make some people think they came from the United States. I wonder how people will react if they found out that publishers are changing the dialog in the works of Charles Dickens, William Shakespeare, James Joyce, Jonathan Swift, and others so their works would be readable for an American audience.

    It would be nice if there are footnotes for British terms and phrases in the American versions, instead of replacing terms and phrases that American readers are unfamiliar with and substituting them with American equivalents.
     
  4. BrianB

    BrianB Producer

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    I thought it was just the first book that was 'altered'?
     
  5. Chris Bardon

    Chris Bardon Cinematographer

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    Nope, all of them had changes made to them. There is a website that summarizes them, but I can't seem to find the URL. It had things broken down by book (and the first one had the most changes by far), and most of the changes were simply changing british terms to american ones. There were a few strange ones such as the adding of token minorities in the sorting scene and word reorderings that really seemed pointless.

    Actually, one of the things I've said since the beginning on this is that the books should have just included a glossary of terms that might be unfamiliar to US readers. I don't think it would have made the books any less popular, and who knows, you might have learned a new word or two from them.

    As for getting the originals, you could also consider chapters.ca-the Canadian editions are identical to the british ones.
     
  6. Kenny Goldin

    Kenny Goldin Second Unit

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    Geez, and I thought it was just the title..."Sorcerer's Stone" vs. "Philosopher's Stone."
    THis is really dissapointing if true. Why do people always think they have to dumb down things for Americans? If anything it would give readers (and a lot of kids) just a little bit of education by having to understand several new terms/phrases/what not?
    Stupid.[​IMG]
     
  7. Thik Nongyow

    Thik Nongyow Stunt Coordinator

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    Chris, here is the web site you may be talking about:
    The Harry Potter Lexicon:
    http://www.i2k.com/~svderark/lexicon/
    Here are the differences between the U.K. and the U.S. versions of the Harry Potter books:
    The Philosopher's Stone:
    http://www.i2k.com/~svderark/lexicon...rences-ss.html
    The Chambers of Secrets:
    http://www.i2k.com/~svderark/lexicon...rences-cs.html
    The Prisoner of Azkaban
    http://www.i2k.com/~svderark/lexicon...rences-pa.html
    The Goblets of Fire
    http://www.i2k.com/~svderark/lexicon...rences-gf.html
    It is very interesting enough, that after "The Philosopher's Stone," there are less differences between the two versions. Can it be that J.K. Rowling is using less British English so to appeal to an international English-reading audience?
    Below is the token minority reference I found in the first book. Notice the adding of a sentence to mention Dean Thomas, a black boy:
    Philosopher's Stone (U.K. edition):
    "...three people left to be sorted. 'Turpin, Lisa' became..."
    Sorcerer's Stone (U.S. edition):
    "...three people left to be sorted. 'Thomas, Dean,' a Black boy even taller than Ron, joined Harry at the Gryffindor table. 'Turpin, Lisa' became..."
    Why or why, does Scholastic want to be "political correct" by inserting a token minority into the story?
     

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