Where do you buy poster frames?

Discussion in 'After Hours Lounge (Off Topic)' started by John_Berger, Aug 18, 2003.

  1. John_Berger

    John_Berger Cinematographer

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    I'm redoing the one room in my house and I want to put up some of my movie posters and other movie memorabilia such as that. The cheapest that I've seen movie poster frames is around $20 each or more. I've seen poster frames on-line for less than $15 each, some even less than $10; but sometimes you get what you pay for.

    Where would you recommend that I buy poster frames for standard-sized movie one-sheets?
     
  2. Chuck C

    Chuck C Cinematographer

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    John, I bought those cheapo one sheet frames, and to be honest, they looked like puke. Most posters aren't exactly 27x40. My Gladiator poster is 39x28. Another is 26x39. They look awful when they don't fit right, so that's one prob. The other prob is the durability of the frames. They'll get scratched and bend. The poster will start to sag inside the frame and look crumpled.

    Instead of spending $80-120 on a nice framing job per poster or $15 per crappy frame, I found something better and cheaper. I bought 30x40" foamcore, 3M Super 77 spray glue, and an exacto blade. Lay newspaper, turn the posters over, spray with the glue evenly, and carefully roll the poster onto the foamcore (I used a brayer/ink roller for the rolling). Get a meter stick and cut away the excess and bingo, beautifully mounted posters. I think spray mounts look better than pro framing sometimes. Anyway, cost of materials given 3 posters:

    $6-12 for glue can
    $18-22 for boards (3)
    $2-5 for knife

    That's $26-39. The only complaint towards this approach is that the poster loses all value. The same is true with professional framing which is basically what I described plus putting a frame around the poster. So it's up to you: saggy posters that don't quite fit in the arched frame or gorgeous spray mounts at the lowest price possible.

    Let me know what you think.
     
  3. John_Berger

    John_Berger Cinematographer

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    Interesting. So, you're in effect talking about using mattes? That certainly would be good for preventing stretching and so forth, but how do you actually mount it and support the rest? Do you put anything in the back to support the entire poster? Or am I misunderstanding what you're talking about?

    I'm not intersted in retaining value. If I'm concerned about the value of any poster, I buy more than one.
     
  4. Chuck C

    Chuck C Cinematographer

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    Matte is another term, and yes, I forgot to mention how to mount them to the wall. Since they are so lightweight, all you need is some heavy duty double sided foam tape. 3M makes some..it's green and white plad. If you're worried that the tape might damage the wall when you go to remove it (like paint chiping off or wallpaper tearing off), I'd suggest looking around for something that's easy to remove like those 3M hooks with the pull tab.
     

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